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No Blagojevich trial delay

Friday, May 28, 2010

* 5:24 pm - The show will go on as planned

U.S. Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens denied a request by former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich to delay his June 3 corruption trial.

Blagojevich had sought a delay until the high court ruled on unrelated cases challenging the federal honest-services fraud law. The justice’s ruling was announced by the court’s public information office. No written decision was issued.

- Posted by Rich Miller   Comments Off      


Reader comments closed for the holiday weekend

Friday, May 28, 2010

* Feeling a bit better, but I need to take it easy for a while. Here’s your Moment of Zen from Tawl Paul via my brother Devin


In time, you’re gonna pay

- Posted by Rich Miller   Comments Off      


Behind the headlines

Friday, May 28, 2010

* The Senate gave final approval to a tax amnesty plan yesterday, with one member voting against it

The “tax-amnesty” bill (SB377) is expected to raise $250 million from tax scofflaws who might otherwise never pay. The deal is that, as long as they pay before Nov. 8, they get out of the usual fines.

The bill now goes to Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn — who, of course, is looking for every dime these days.

The bill passed almost unanimously, with just one “no” vote: Sen. Bill Brady, R-Bloomington, the Republican nominee for governor and Quinn’s election opponent in November.

We haven’t yet been able to ask Brady about his opposition. Other opponents have generally complained that the measure rewards people who have failed to pay their taxes, letting them off the hook for fines they should pay, while not offering anything to taxpayers who’ve paid on time.

There may be at least two reasons besides the gubernatorial candidate’s issue stance and the political season for that “No” vote. The first, of course, is the fact that Brady didn’t pay state income taxes in 2008, as well as asking for and receiving a $1,616 refund.

The second is that Brady’s tax returns showed he underpaid his federal income taxes by $137,800 and paid a $4,388 penalty in 2004.

* Speaking of taxes

The Illinois Senate on Thursday endorsed a taxpayer-backed retail development that supporters say will bring thousands of jobs to Southern Illinois.

The proposal, approved on a 34-17 vote, would use sales tax receipts to subsidize Swansea developer Bruce Holland’s plans for a “destination development” on 400-acres in Marion.

Senate approval came after a failed bid by officials in Mount Vernon to expand the project to their community. Mount Vernon Mayor Mary Jane Chesley told senators that the proposal will put her community at a competitive disadvantage when it comes to drawing retailers and consumers. […]

“This bill will take away from the City of Mount Vernon,” said state Sen. John Jones, R-Mount Vernon. “I cannot stand by and let the city of Mount Vernon be destroyed.”

Sen. Brady voted for the bill and Gov. Quinn is expected to sign it, which will make this the “Worst Law Ever.”

* The Tribune editorial board is either without a clue or deliberately not telling the truth

The bill on Quinn’s desk was written by the coin machine industry’s lobbyists and hustled through the legislature with no input from state regulators or the public. Nothing good ever comes of that.

The Gaming Board’s staff long ago signed off on the bill when approached by gaming lobbyists. The proposal had public hearings in both chambers, which the Gaming Board and gaming opponents attended and testified to.

* And, of course, the governor’s McPier AV was overridden. But all this talk by the naysayers that Chicago is just not up to competing against Las Vegas and Orlando is hooey

The National Restaurant Assn., which wrapped up its annual show Tuesday with more than 58,000 attending, is among those that have considered leaving.

The NRA, which had the fourth-largest show in Chicago last year, saw a 6% increase in attendance this year.

* Related and a roundup…

* Lawmakers punt unbalanced state budget back to Quinn

* Madigan: Lawmakers Won’t Return to Springfield Yet

* Sweeny: Borrowing out; $6.6 billion deficit still in for Illinois budget

* Martire: Objective look at our state isn’t pretty

* Illinois Lawmakers Override Governor’s Veto on McPier Bill

* Senate, House override Quinn’s McPier veto

* Lawmakers reject Quinn’s veto of convention bill

* McPier overhaul is law as lawmakers reject Quinn’s veto

* Lawmakers reject Quinn’s veto of convention bill

* Senate Passes STAR Bonds Bill

* STAR bonds pass Senate

* State Senate OKs STAR bonds bill

* Bill with special tax breaks for developer goes to Ill. governor

* STAR Bond bill passes State Senate

* Daily Herald: Quinn must veto looser poker rules

* Ill. Bill Seeks to Protect Juvenile Prostitutes

* Environmentalists Praise IL Solar Energy Bill

* Legislators, about to get raises, pass Boland bill opposing R.I. County raises

* Quinn can keep transparency door open

- Posted by Rich Miller   14 Comments      


Question of the day

Friday, May 28, 2010

* As you know, I vowed not to cut my hair or trim my beard until the General Assembly adjourned for the summer. Since the session doesn’t appear to be over, do you think I should ignore my wife, loved ones and friends and keep the promise? Or should I go ahead and cut and trim?

As always, explain your answer, please.

- Posted by Rich Miller   69 Comments      


About that unemployment rate

Friday, May 28, 2010

* Voices for Illinois Children has published a graph which shows unemployment rates for Illinois (in blue) and the US (in red) during the deep recession of the early 1980s. Click on the pic for a larger image…

This shows two things:

1) Illinois’ unemployment rate has tracked closely with, but has always hovered above the national rate for decades. Most of us who watch this stuff already know that, but too many people don’t. This has always been a problem here and it’s mainly because we’ve relied so much on manufacturing. During the 1980s, many of those jobs moved to the non-union South. In the 1990s, they went to Mexico. Now, they’re going to China, although a friend of mine is losing his factory job soon because the plant is moving to Mexico.

Here’s a more up-to-date graph of Illinois and US unemployment since January of 2008

Closely tracked, but always above. This is the way it’s always been here.

2) I’ll let Voices for Illinois Children’s Larry Joseph explain this one

In January 1983, Illinois was in the depths of a severe recession. Unemployment in the state had reached 12.9 percent, substantially higher than the current rate of 11.5 percent.

Nonetheless, the General Assembly and the Governor instituted a temporary 18-month income tax increase to bolster state revenues. The individual income tax was raised from 2.5 percent to 3 percent and the corporate income tax from 4 percent to 4.8 percent.

During the first quarter of 1983, the state’s unemployment rate was 12.9 percent, up from 8.3 percent in mid-1981. By the third quarter of 1984, after the income tax surcharge had expired, unemployment had fallen to 8.7 percent — a drop of more than 4 percentage points. Over the same period of time, nation-wide unemployment declined from 10.4 percent to 7.4 percent.

There is no indication that the tax increase had an adverse impact on the state’s economy. The recovery in Illinois was shaped primarily by macroeconomic conditions, not by changes in state tax policy. [Emphasis added.]

We need to be far less concerned with our income tax rates and far more concerned with doing things that create jobs. With corporations and individuals spending money on debt reduction rather than expansion or purchasing, the government needs to step in and fill the void. [Hat tip: Progress Illinois]

* Related

The unemployment rate in the Chicago metropolitan area continued to improve in April, falling to 10.7 percent from 11.2 percent in March, the Illinois Department of Employment Security reported today.

The rate was up from 9.8 percent in April 2009 and was above year-ago levels in all 12 metropolitan areas for the 35th straight month, but the increases have been consistently smaller in each of the four most recent months, IDES said. The rate was 11.3 percent in February.

The Chicago metropolitan area lost 84,500 jobs last month from a year earlier.

“Four consecutive months of smaller increases in (the unemployment) rate is encouraging because it offers another measure that indicates this national recession might be nearing an end,” IDES Director Maureen O’Donnell said in a statement. “Knowing that unemployment rates look to the past, and knowing that Illinois has added more than 51,000 jobs so far this year, suggests that we are closer to escaping the pressure that the Great Recession has exerted on our local job markets.”

- Posted by Rich Miller   66 Comments      


*** UPDATED x2 *** Blackhawks open thread

Friday, May 28, 2010

* On a lighter note, here’s Gov. Quinn dancing in support of the Chicago Blackhawks

Are they gonna win it all or what?

…Adding… The full video is here.

*** UPDATE *** This should kick your day up a notch


We found your weakness
And it’s right outside your door

*** UPDATE 2 *** Congressman Mike Quigley, the co-chairman of the Congressional Hockey Caucus, faced off with Rep. Patrick Murphy this morning. Rep. Bob Brady of Philadelphia then playfully attacked Quigley and pulled Quigley’s Hawks jersey over his head. Watch


- Posted by Rich Miller   20 Comments      


A look at the pension borrowing debate and what’s ahead

Friday, May 28, 2010

* Budgetary cluelessness

On what could be the final legislative day until November, Gov. Quinn’s bid to borrow $3.7 billion to pay for state pensions stalled in the Senate, where GOP gubernatorial nominee Bill Brady and fellow Republicans withheld support.

“We’ve been able to stave off more pension borrowing on the backs of our children and grandchildren,” said Brady, of Bloomington.

The governor proposed borrowing for the pension payment over 8 years. That’s hardly an intergenerational debt. However, skipping the pension payment will cost tens of billions of dollars due to lost interest on investments over the next few decades. That truly is intergenerational, and that’s what Brady and his fellows just caused, unless the Senate can find the votes for the borrowing plan. From Kate Grossman, a Sun-Times editorial page editor…

Skipping a pension payment costs much more than borrowing. If the state skips, it could lose at least $20 billion in investment income over 20 years. Borrowing $3.7 billion now would cost about $1 billion.

We urge the Republicans and the two wayward Democrats who don’t support pension borrowing to mull over this simple math for the next two weeks.

* Political cluelessness

[Democratic Sen. Heather Steans] said she may be able to support a smaller borrowing effort if it was part of a budget package that also included more spending cuts and a way to raise revenue, such as an income tax increase.

Yeah. An income tax hike in a year like this. That’ll happen.

* Logrolling isn’t illegal, but it doesn’t appear to have happened on the pension borrowing proposal in the Senate

[Senate Republican Leader Christine Radogno] also said the Quinn administration approached Republicans with “promises of facilities or perks or money for their districts in exchange for votes. It’s unsavory at best or illegal.”

Sen. Larry Bomke, R-Springfield, said previously he had been contacted by Quinn about supporting the borrowing plan. He said nothing was offered.

“No, and I didn’t ask for anything,” Bomke said. “He just asked if I would vote for it. I said, `Governor, why do you need me? You’ve got 37 (Democratic senate) votes.”’

Notice that Bomke didn’t say he was opposed to borrowing, just that the Democrats should do it on their own. The State Journal-Register is fed up with this attitude

Their political party before their state. Their Republican colleagues before their constituents. The leader of their caucus before the taxpayers.

Those were the choices state Reps. Raymond Poe, R-Springfield, and Rich Brauer, R-Petersburg, made on Tuesday night. Poe and Brauer voted against a plan to borrow $3.7 billion to make the state’s full payment, on time, to the pension systems.

And the Pantagraph makes a good point

Consider Tuesday’s vote on a borrowing plan.

Two Republicans were said to have “broken ranks” because they voted with the Democratic majority to approve the proposal.

Republican state party chairman Pat Brady almost seemed more concerned that Rep. Bob Biggins, R-Elmhurst, missed a Republican caucus meeting than the fact that Biggins was one of only two Republicans who voted for the borrowing plan. State Rep. Bill Black, R-Danville, was the other.

Does anyone think it was a coincidence that the two Republicans who voted in favor of the plan aren’t up for re-election?

* This is what will happen now

“Without the borrowing to make the pension payment, the pension payments get in line with everybody else,” Madigan said. “They become a matter for the governor and the comptroller in terms of managing the cash-flow.”

Also, the governor received some extraordinary powers from the General Assembly this week…

But other options may exist. Part of the emergency budget powers granted to Quinn allow him to tap surpluses in special state accounts to cover state spending, though the money must be paid back within 18 months with 1 percent interest.

Quinn already proposed borrowing $1 billion from those accounts, but lawmakers didn’t limit how much he could take so long as it doesn’t impede the cause or effort for which the account was created. The Senate’s budget pointman said upward of $3 billion might be available for the governor’s use.

A few budget highlights

*Borrow $1.2 billion against future tobacco settlement proceeds.

*Allow Gov. Pat Quinn to hold up to $2 billion of state spending in reserve.

*Allow Quinn to borrow money from restricted state funds.

*Give state until Dec. 31, instead of Aug. 31, to pay bills left over from this year.

*Eliminate cost-of-living pay increases for state lawmakers next year.

*Cut daily expense money for lawmakers from $139 to $111 next year.

*Cut mileage rate paid to lawmakers from 50 cents to 39 cents.

* Related…

* Borrowing out; $6.6 billion deficit still in for Illinois budget

* Madigan: Lawmakers Won’t Return to Springfield Yet: The House approved — but the Senate would not consider — a bill to borrow the money to make pension payments. Madigan says an “emergency budget act” gives Gov. Pat Quinn enough latitude to try to make things work. “We acknowledge that we’re running a deficit, like 47 other states,” says Madigan. “Gov. Quinn is entitled to extraordinary budget powers, the ability to borrow from other funds.”

* Kadner: Miller says his vote just the ‘Right Thing’

- Posted by Rich Miller   18 Comments      


*** UPDATED x1 *** Brady wants Attorney General probe of Quinn checks

Friday, May 28, 2010

*** UPDATE - 1:48 pm *** Quinn’s campaign finally whacks back at Brady on his votes…

A far more serious breach that deserves immediate investigation is Brady’s repeated votes on legislation that served to financially benefit himself and his business interests. Senator Brady can’t possibly claim he didn’t know there was a conflict of interest.

The people of Illinois who pay his salary need to know why Senator Brady repeatedly voted on bills that he knew would promote development projects in which he plainly had a substantial and personal financial interest.”

They couldn’t have done that on Sunday or Monday? Sheesh.

[ *** End of Update *** ]

* As we’ll see in a bit, this isn’t the first time that Bill Brady has demanded that Lisa Madigan investigate Pat Quinn’s fundraising. From a press release…

Gubernatorial candidate Bill Brady is calling for an investigation into Governor Pat Quinn’s acceptance of $75,000 in campaign cash from the Teamsters Union just before his amendatory veto on McCormick Place that would have benefitted the union.

“It’s appears to be another shameful example of pay-to-play politics,” Brady said. “The people of Illinois deserve a thorough investigation.” Brady will ask Attorney General Lisa Madigan to begin the investigation.

* My Sun-Times column today is about how both of these candidates are under a cloud

I’ve been wondering all week why Gov. Quinn’s campaign has all but ignored an explosive but little-noticed story.

Quinn has been silent about the revelation that his Republican opponent Bill Brady had voted for three different bills that directly helped his struggling real estate company develop a project in Champaign.

The area that Brady was developing had no sewer system, and Champaign was having trouble buying the property easements to lay pipe, so the town asked the General Assembly to give it “quick take” powers that would allow them to seize the land for a fair price.

A very high-level Democrat who is often the target of media investigations told me the other day that he would be sent to prison if he voted to directly benefit his own business.

It’s one thing if, say, a farmer votes for a bill backed by the Illinois Farm Bureau that would help lots of farmers throughout the state.

It’s quite another thing if that same farmer voted for a bill which helped only himself.

This ought to be big news, and it’s full of rich targets for campaign press releases.

“Brady voted to pad his own pockets,” is one hit that springs to mind. The “sewer” stuff writes itself.

The same guy who didn’t pay federal income taxes for two straight years was involved in a project subsidized in part by federal funds. But Quinn’s campaign didn’t take the bait.

He should’ve done something, because now the governor has found himself on the defensive.

Last year right about this time, Quinn got into trouble when it was revealed that a campaign staffer was asking lobbyists to set up fund-raisers. This happened near the scheduled end of the spring legislative session, so all of those lobbyists had bills awaiting the governor’s signature or veto.

The lobbyists leaked the story, and Quinn was forced to apologize. He vowed not to do any more fund-raising until after the session was over.

Apparently, that promise didn’t apply to this year’s spring session.

On Thursday, my buddy Greg Hinz at Crain’s Chicago Business broke the story that the governor had received some very large campaign checks — totaling $75,000 — from the Teamsters Union in late April. At the time, the Teamsters were fighting legislative attempts to change McCormick Place’s union work rules. The work-rule changes remained in the McPier reform bill that passed both chambers, and the Teamsters were furious. They threatened to sue to block the changes.

Not coincidentally, Quinn has been saying that he was worried that the bill would prompt lawsuits.

Quinn eventually decided to slap the bill with an amendatory veto. Buried within the text was a provision that killed off a small McPier union and handed its members to the Teamsters.

Think of it as a consolation prize.

The Legislature voted to override Quinn’s veto Thursday.

Quinn alienated every public employee union in the state last month when he signed a pension reform bill into law. Those unions contribute millions of dollars to campaigns, and they’re not giving him any money now. He couldn’t afford to also alienate the big unions at McPier.

So, it was pretty much a given that his amendatory veto was pure politics. What we didn’t know at the time, however, was that Quinn had already taken a large pile of cash from the Teamsters.

When Quinn got into that fund-raising trouble last year, Brady almost immediately called on Attorney General Lisa Madigan to investigate.

Maybe she ought to take a look at both of them.

And call me paranoid, but I can’t help but wonder if that’s why Quinn has been so strangely silent about his opponent’s serious ethical lapse.

* By the way, the Tribune followed up on Greg Hinz’s piece without any attribution. And notice the lede

Only a month before Gov. Pat Quinn rewrote legislation to help the Teamsters at the McCormick Place convention center, the labor group gave the Democratic governor $75,000 in political donations, his campaign acknowledged Thursday.

That’s a crisp, concise AP Style lede with everything you really need to know up front. Now, contrast that with the lede on the story about how Brady voted three times on bills that directly benefited his real estate company

On the southwest fringe of Champaign along Interstate Highway 57 stands the Curtis Road interchange, its ornate limestone overpass and decorative red-brick towers surrounded by acres of open farmland.

You have to read 25 grafs into the piece before you find the Brady bills stuff.

Sure makes you wonder why the two stories are so different.

- Posted by Rich Miller   37 Comments      


The end(?) videos

Friday, May 28, 2010

[Posted by Barton Lorimor]

* Contrast to the last couple of days, the Capitol is quiet today after the Senate adjourned without voting on the pension bonding bill. President Cullerton restated last night that the votes to pass the bill were just not there…


* Leader Cross said he does not consider this session a victory for Republicans given that the pension bonding bill is struggling in the Senate. Have a look…


* Speaker Madigan spoke to reporters after the House adjourned Wednesday. Here are those videos in case they were missed…

Part 1

Part 2

* Sen. Brady held his own presser last night and went to work on Gov. Quinn for the McPier amendatory veto and the Democrats for trying to borrow the $3.7 billion pension payment. Reporters also tried to get the Bloomington Republican to reveal more details of where he would cut from the budget. Brady again stressed his belief the state could save a good chunk of change by auditing the Medicaid system. The presser is below in three parts.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

* Leader Radogno joined Brady in calling for a Medicaid audit…


- Posted by Barton Lorimor   10 Comments      


Morning Shorts

Friday, May 28, 2010

* Employment signs pointing up in Illinois, officials say

The department called the trend toward month-to-month declines a significant sign of an improving job market. Through the first four months of the year, the state has added 51,000 jobs compared to the same period of 2009.

* Chicago’s unemployment rate fell to 10.7 percent in April

* Metro-east jobless rate falls by more than 2 percent

* 13 local counties see unemployment rates dip in April

* Decatur April unemployment at 12.8 percent

* Flags at half-staff to honor slain Chicago cop

* Illinois lags some states in combating hospital-acquired infections

* Ameren to seek rate rehearing Friday

Ameren Corp. plans to ask state regulators Friday for another hearing on its request for higher electric and natural-gas delivery rates after the original $130 million proposal was cut to $10 million.

At the same time, the company announced Thursday that it will pass cheaper wholesale electric costs on to Illinois customers June 1.

* Ameren dropping rates by 6 percent

A typical residential customer who uses 10,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity a year will save approximately $68, or about 6 percent on their total annual bill for electricity, said Johnson.

* No. 1 in felony drug cases

In Cook County, drug crimes represented a bigger share of felony cases than any other major county in the United States, according to a federal study released Thursday.

The Justice Department study — a snapshot of 39 counties in May 2006 — found that drug crimes were the most serious charge filed against 57 percent of felony defendants in Cook County.

Also in Cook County, only 9 percent of the felony cases involved violent crimes, the lowest percentage in the United States, according to the study. The percentage of property crimes and public crimes, such as driving under the influence, were in the average range among the 39 counties.

* Daley: ‘Understands’ what prompted home intruder shooting

* Daley blames beach arrests on drinking, texting high schoolers

* Daley blames suburbanites for city beach unrest

* Curfew breakers to be sent to parks

* New CTA L cars temporarily pulled out of service

Bombardier, the Pennsylvania manufacturer of the L cars, has been working on a modification tol improve the brakes, according to the CTA, which said the trains haven’t experienced any brake failures but that, under certain conditions a component was found to be affected by vibrations, whch the transit agency said could, over time result in a loss of braking friction.

* New CTA rail cars temporarily sidelined

* Chicago Teachers Union Election Gets Tougher for Incumbent

Just 500 votes separated CTU President Marilyn Stewart from her toughest challenger in last Friday’s election. More than 19,000 teachers cast ballots. Stewart didn’t get enough votes to avoid a runoff.

Last night, third place finisher Deborah Lynch announced she’s throwing her support behind challenger Karen Lewis. The fourth place finisher has also endorsed Lewis.

* Navistar critics say company wasn’t listening to them

* Southtown Star: No hiding the report, Oak Lawn

* Kane coroner makes first court appearance on misconduct charges

* Winnebago County Board freezes 3 salaries, some bonuses cut

* [Quad Cities] businesses prepare to bid for Thomson contracts

* Video: Inside [Normal’s] new baseball stadium

* Blagojevich judge says he won’t start over with jury screening

* American Blagojevich Idol: The Awesome Reality Show That Could Be

- Posted by Barton Lorimor   7 Comments      


Energize Illinois’ Economy: Say YES to Tenaska’s Taylorville Energy Center

Friday, May 28, 2010

[The following is a paid advertisement.]

Taylorville means jobs

• Nearly 10 million labor hours needed to build plant - resulting in almost 2,500 construction jobs at peak
• Hundreds of permanent plant and mining jobs
• Billions of private dollars injected into Illinois economy

Taylorville protects ratepayers

• Residential and small business customer rate impact capped at 2.015%
• No cost to ratepayers before 2015, when TEC comes online
• Increasing supply of “base load” power will hold down future prices


Taylorville safeguards the environment

• Emissions comparable to natural gas generation
• Net reduction of nearly 2 million tons of CO2 annually
• Dry cooling design cuts water needed by 70% - no fresh water used for cooling

U of I / Illinois Chamber of Commerce study shows clean coal economic “Ripple Effect”

• “Clean coal development produces significant energy, jobs, economic development and significant, long-term positive economic impact on the state”
• Taylorville and similar projects can boost central and southern Illinois economy


Taylorville supported by broad coalition including

• AFL-CIO
• American Lung Association of Illinois
• Citizens Utility Board (CUB)
• Clean Air Task Force
• Illinois Coal Association

For more information, visit cleancoalillinois.com

- Posted by Capitol Fax Blog Advertising Department   Comments Off      


*** UPDATED x1 *** Delay in posting today

Friday, May 28, 2010

* I went to bed last night with a toothache and woke up with half my face swollen up. Not good. So, I’m gonna get me some medical attention. Barton will put up Morning Shorts and some videos. I’ll be back later.

*** UPDATE *** Strong antibiotics and pain killers were prescribed and now I’m back to work. Sorry for the delay, and particular apologies to subscribers for not publishing something today. I was a little freaked out when I woke up and saw my face was all swollen, and I’m usually not easily freaked.

- Posted by Rich Miller   Comments Off      


Cullerton won’t call pension bonding bill

Thursday, May 27, 2010

* The Senate might return this summer, apparently, but they are adjourning today without taking up the pension borrowing bill. From the Senate Democrats…

The Senate is returning to the floor to vote on the Emergency Budget Act, the McPier Trailer Bill and a list of other measures. The pension borrowing bill is not on that list.

President Cullerton supports the bill, but it is clear that there are not enough votes to pass it today.

Like last year’s pension borrowing solution, the Governor will need Republican support before the bill passes the Senate. A few House Republicans took responsible action on the borrowing bill, and we will need a similar number of Senate Republicans to support the measure here.

If there is evidence of Republican support in the next few weeks, President Cullerton is will reconvene the Senate this summer to pass the bill.

Senate President John Cullerton talked to reporters much earlier today about his problems passing the bill


* Speaking of pension bonds, Greg Blankenship sent me a couple of links today. First, this Illinois Policy Institute pension borrowing plan from January

Ask yourself this: If you were in charge of Illinois, would you take out a 10-year, $12 billion loan with strong provisions for quick payback in return for two things:

* tax rebates for Illinois families totaling $690 billion from 2021 to 2045; and

* a constitutionally-protected spending growth limit that reins in spending to the rate of inflation plus population and cannot be changed without voter approval?

This is the choice offered by implementing our Pension Funding and Fairness Act, in combination with the modest pension benefit reforms proposed by Governor Pat Quinn in 2009.

We think the choice is obvious. Do we stick with “business as usual” in Illinois and continue to bankrupt our state, or choose long-term, fiscally responsible programs that address the harsh realities facing our state? […]

True, our proposal reluctantly endorses borrowing. But it does so to address the real political and policy challenges facing Illinois in a proactive and practical way.

And the Illinois Policy Institute’s press release today on pension borrowing

The lack of leadership from elected officials in our state reared its ugly head again this week. Illinois will likely be stuck with another unbalanced budget this year, thanks in large part to two retiring Republican legislators.

Rep. Bill Black and Rep. Bob Biggins joined House Democrats in voting for a $3.7 billion borrowing plan to make the state’s annual pension payment. Instead of putting the pension contribution at the front of the payment line—where it belongs after years of neglect—and then allocating remaining resources to various programs, this plan takes the pressure off the General Assembly to balance the budget without gimmicks. This irresponsible borrowing package was such a bad idea that leaders had to bring it up for a vote twice in order to pass it.

Then again, maybe it is easier to stick the next generation with a bigger bill when you’re retiring from office and won’t have to deal with the consequences next year and thereafter. Unfortunately, taxpayers continue to pay the salaries of elected officials who choose punting the hard decisions until next year instead of rolling up their sleeves to do the job they were elected to do – even the ones retiring.

A loan to make pension payments and fund tax rebates is sound policy but a loan to make pension payments and avoid a tax increase while still making budget cuts is not?

* Meanwhile, Attorney General Lisa Madigan showed her tax returns to Greg Hinz

There wasn’t much in the reports — she and her husband have survived exclusively on her state pay and her husband’s sporadic income as an artist, paid their taxes and given a bit to charity — so there’s not much the public needs to know.

But that’s not the case all time, so the pressure will continue on, say, wealthy GOP gubernatorial candidate Jason Plummer to tell us how much he paid in taxes.

- Posted by Rich Miller   19 Comments      


Madigan talks about the budget, Blagojevich, Brady

Thursday, May 27, 2010

* House Speaker Michael Madigan spent about 15 minutes with reporters today after he adjourned the chamber to the call of the chair.

Part 2 is the more interesting video. Right off the bat, he bluntly admits that the budget he passed is not balanced, which is a blatant admission that it’s unconstitutional.

Madigan also talks about the impact the Rod Blagojevich trial will have on the election, and particularly on his own House members. He cracked how the Bill Brady campaign is the “best thing for the Quinn campaign.” It’s well worth a watch


Part 1


* I tried to post this video earlier, but it didn’t process right, so let’s do it again. Bill Brady talks about the governor’s AV of the McPier bill


* Senate GOP Leader Christine Radogno on the session


* Back to Speaker Madigan, who in this video announces the adjournment


- Posted by Rich Miller   16 Comments      


Quinn got big bucks before his McPier AV

Thursday, May 27, 2010

* Gov. Pat Quinn’s campaign just admitted to some suspect contributions

Quinn campaign aides confirm that the Teamsters on April 23 sent him checks for $50,000 and $25,000. And buzz is that local Teamsters chief John Coli has sent or is about to send another $100,000.

As I’ve already told you, the Teamsters want to take over the Riggers union at McCormick Place and Quinn included that very provision in his amendatory veto of the McPier reform bill.

Yikes.

Sen. Bill Brady issued a statement claiming that Quinn was “working to cut a deal to support the same insiders who led us into this mess in the first place and who he is courting to help his own political career.”

Brady didn’t mention the issue while talking to reporters today about the governor’s AV.

The House and Senate both voted to override the governor’s veto today.

* Speaking of quid pro quo, there is lots of chatter about some major logrolling going on during the Senate’s attempt to pass the pension borrowing bill. And Sen. Rickey Hendon probably didn’t help matters much during committee today when he asked the budget director to remember the Democrats when it comes time to divvy up the state cash.

Watch Hendon’s comments and Senate GOP Leader Christine Radogno talking about the logrolling reports and connecting them to Hendon’s comments


- Posted by Rich Miller   37 Comments      


*** UPDATED x2 *** That’s politics, baby

Thursday, May 27, 2010

* After zooming through the House, “The Worst Bill Ever” failed to get out of a committee this morning

Sales tax and revenue (STAR) bonds legislation failed to get enough support to move out of a state senate committee today, according to State Sen. Kyle McCarter (R-Lebanon). […]

“They didn’t call it because there weren’t enough votes to get it out of State Government (Committee),” McCarter said Thursday.

Ah, but have no fear, the bill was sent back to the Committee on Assignments, which reassigned the measure to the Senate Labor Committee. The chairman of Labor is Sen. Gary Forby, who is sponsoring the bill.

*** UPDATE *** It’s about to be called the “Worst Law Ever.” The bill passed 34-17-3 and is heading to the governor.

[ *** End of Update *** ]

* A few days ago, a House Republican campaign operative pointed out a story I had missed. The Rock Island County Board had voted for 12.7 percent pay raises over four years, with no pay raises the first two. Three days later, the county asked its union employees to take voluntary furloughs.

It’s relevant to me because Republican county board member Rich Morthland is running for an open House seat against Democrat Dennis Ahern. The Republicans think they have a shot there, and were thrilled to be handed the issue. Morthland is milking it for all it’s worth

County Board Member, Rich Morthland, calls this action “Immoral and unjust”. This is the time for the people of Rock island County to tell their elected officials that enough is enough. This is the time for us to take back our government and bring these people to account.

And they’ve completely integrated the local repeal effort into Morthland’s campaign

At the news conference [to kick off a repeal the raises petition drive], Morthland referred to a website asking for donations of $500 to $2,500 for the repeal effort.

Visitors who click on the site’s donation button are taken to a separate page, where they’re told the money is for the repeal effort but that it will go to Morthland’s campaign committee.

“In the event that all such contributions are not necessary to support the (repeal), remaining contributions may be used to directly support the Committee to Elect Rich Morthland,” the website says. […]

“I can’t have a separate campaign that also might benefit me not go through my campaign fund,” [Morthland] said.

Somebody else could’ve set up the campaign fund, but since Morthland’s campaign is running the whole show, he’s probably right.

Yesterday, the House Democrats stepped in. Rep. Mike Boland, who represents the county, filed a bill to freeze county officials’ pay at their current levels.

So, what happened? Well, the Republicans tried to nitpick the bill to death during debate. They pointed out that Boland had voted for or gainst this or that bill in the past to say he was a hypocrite, etc. Here’s one example


In the end, the bill passed with 70 votes. Republicans made up most of the “No” votes.

To sum up: The Republicans found a great campaign issue. The Democrats realized they had a campaign problem and moved quickly to address it via legislation. The Republicans pitched a fit because they’ve now lost a campaign issue. The Democrats, on the other hand, have set a pretty dangerous precedent by bigfooting the locals on what ought to be a county matter.

*** UPDATE *** Sen. Mike Boland, who also represents Rock Island County, took over sponsorship of the Boland bill today and apparently will sit on it

Sen. Mike Jacobs, D-East Moline, suggested the measure may have a tough time getting a hearing in the chamber before lawmakers adjourn for the summer.

“I don’t know what business it is of the state to tell local governments how to balance their checkbooks when the state can’t balance its own,” Jacobs said.

[ *** End of Update *** ]

* The Democrats have pushed a bill this year that has the Republicans a bit freaked out

It includes several provisions, but the most controversial deals with its requirement that 12 separate counties, including Champaign, Coles and McLean counties in East Central Illinois, establish separate early voting and grace period registration sites on [college] campuses for the Nov. 2 general election only.

The GOP response is all about self-preservation, since college-aged people trend Democratic and several universities are represented by Republican legislators, not to mention the statewide race this fall…

Among those voting no was Sen. Dale Righter, R-Charleston, whose district includes the Eastern Illinois University campus.

“I think it’s inappropriate for Springfield to say we’re more worried about registration and early voting for college students than we are for seniors, individuals with disabilities, or racial minorities or whoever else may be served by that county clerk at all,” said Righter. “That’s what this bill does by saying you’re going to put an office on the college campus as opposed to anywhere else.”

The Democrat-controlled Senate is expected to pass the bill today.

* The House passed a bill not long ago taking away free rides for seniors. The bill ran into opposition in the Senate, which then sent the House a bill that reformed the free rides program by putting an income limit on it. The House adjourned today without taking action, so the matter is dead for now. But one Republican gave the Democrats some cover on the issue

A suburban lawmaker who pushed legislation to eliminate the controversial free rides for seniors program said she isn’t interested in supporting changes the Senate made.

State Rep. Suzie Bassi, a Palatine Republican, said the Senate version that would limit free public transit rides for single seniors making more than $41,515 wouldn’t save enough money over the long term.

- Posted by Rich Miller   18 Comments      


Question of the day

Thursday, May 27, 2010

* The setup

A Chicago-area atheist activist isn’t happy that $20,000 in state money is going to an 11-story cross on southern Illinois’ highest point, and he wants the landmark’s overseers to give the money back or be sued.

Atheist Rob Sherman has told the group Friends of Bald of Knob Cross that a religious symbol getting taxpayer money is inappropriate. […]

The 47-year-old cross near Alto Pass is undergoing a renovation expected to be completed this summer.

* The Question: Is this an appropriate use of state money? Explain.

- Posted by Rich Miller   70 Comments      


Cohen allegedly using “junkies” to pass petitions

Thursday, May 27, 2010

* Not unexpected

They say they don’t know who Scott Lee Cohen is, why he’s running for governor or who his opponents are.

They don’t know who can legally sign a petition.

But that’s not stopping people hired off the street on behalf of the Cohen campaign from collecting petition signatures for a dollar each.

You should really read the whole story. It’s unintentionally hilarious. Allegations of “junkies” being recruited to circulate petition sheets, a base of operations at a Cohen pawn shop and the flop-house upstairs, and then there’s this fantastic quote from Cohen’s spokesperson…

“There are thousands upon thousands of people collecting signatures for Scott around the state.”

Yeah. Right. I totally believe that “thousands upon thousands” of people are passing sheets for Cohen. Ridiculous.

* In other unusual campaign news, Green Party gubernatorial nominee Rich Whitney is getting quite a bit of local coverage of his statewide tour

The Green Party candidate for governor is using the state’s public transit systems to push a green agenda.

Rich Whitney is in the midst of a nearly 700-mile tour of the state, which he is traveling exclusively by rail and bicycle. He hopes the journey will draw attention to the need to upgrade the state’s public transit infrastructure, and lessen Illinoisan’s dependence on cars.

And, unlike a certain lt. governor nominee I can think of, he’s promised to release his tax returns…

When asked about releasing his tax return, Whitney said he would likely get around to doing so after redacting some of his wife’s information. He characterized the joint return as reflecting “lower-middle class” incomes of a “people’s attorney” and a nurse.

He hemmed and hawed a little bit in Springfield this week, however. Watch


- Posted by Rich Miller   30 Comments      


McPier veto react harsh, swift

Thursday, May 27, 2010

* Yesterday, the governor’s staff told Crain’s that the trade shows supported his amendatory veto of the McPier reform bill…

The trade show people are OK with the gov’s action.

I followed up and asked the governor’s spokesman to provide some names of trade show folks who backed the AV. Here’s his response…

We’ve met with and been in communication with several of the major trade shows, including Housewares and the Restaurant show. The governor promised them swift action and to not weaken the reforms in the bill. We’ve responded by strengthening the reforms based on their demands for more efficient and streamlined operations at McPier. They have been supportive of stregthening the bill and want certainty by Friday, which will happen.

But the person who runs the National Restaurant Association’s annual show doesn’t sound so pleased in this Tribune quote

“I’m desperately concerned, when you start with different amendatory pieces, that you could unintentionally dilute what you’re trying to do and what you can deliver to the customer,” said Mary Pat Heftman, who runs the National Restaurant Association’s annual show here. The show is waiting for a final outcome in Springfield before deciding whether to remain in Chicago beyond 2011.

* The mayor’s not happy either

The mayor voiced support for an override of Quinn’s amendatory veto, saying a failure to do so could lead to the exit of a number of trade shows.

“It would put a lot of people in jeopardy, because a lot of these conventions sign five years or 10 years out. Will they not sign a five-year contract? That is the problem, and uncertainty,” he said. “When you have uncertainty, when you lose some of them, we’re afraid to start losing more and more.”

Daley spoke against the $2 increase in taxicab rides from the city’s two airports the other day, but he’s now changed his tune

Daley lobbied against increasing the tax on taxi and limousine rides to and from the airport for fear that it would hurt struggling cabbies and single out Chicago airports. But he said the money was needed to boost Chicago’s meager tourism budget against rival cities that have “unlimited” marketing budgets.

* The Tribune was predictably harsh

The governor also rejected a $2 tax increase on taxi and limo rides at the city’s airports, to pay for convention marketing. That higher tax would be “counterproductive” to efforts to boost the convention industry, Quinn said.

Hey, we’re glad to see the governor acknowledge that tax increases have economic consequences.

But, really. He’s taking a stand against $8 million in taxi fees while he pushes a $2.8 billion income tax increase? Come on.

The biggest howler of all in Quinn’s veto message was this quote: “As long as I have been governor, my message has been clear: When it comes to reform, half measures do not suffice. The only real reform is comprehensive reform.”

Oh my goodness, Governor! Can you really say that with a straight face to Patrick Collins and the other members of the ethics commission you appointed last year? You set them up and promptly abandoned them and their comprehensive ideas. You signed half-measure after half-measure that you called ethics “reform.”

- Posted by Rich Miller   6 Comments      


It’s not just the politicians screwing up this state

Thursday, May 27, 2010

* Since last year, a small group of local citizens has been fighting Navistar’s plans to build a corporate headquarters in Lisle and bring 4,000 jobs to the site. They’ve forced the town to hold large numbers of hours-long zoning hearings on the matter, they forced subpoenas to be issued and depositions to be taken, threatened lawsuits and recently filed suit to restart the excruciating hearing process all over again. Lisle has spent $200,000 on the process.

Navistar scaled back its plans in March, but that didn’t satisfy the opponents and now the company has thrown in the towel

Navistar officials said Wednesday the company is no longer interested in moving its international headquarters to Lisle.

The announcement took many by surprise, and prompted a flurry of activity, including an attempt by Gov. Pat Quinn to step in. Business leaders and county policymakers were quick to condemn a vocal few for thwarting the plan.

Stung by what they called unfair criticism that was sullying the engine-building giant’s reputation, Navistar will begin looking for other sites, possibly but not necessarily in Illinois, said Don Sharp, Navistar’s vice president of communications.

“We certainly never signed up for our company to be put on trial by a small group of people opposing economic development,” Sharp said. “In our view, we are being put on trial for things simply beyond zoning issues.”

* But the opponents are still unmoved…

Rich Wilkie, another neighbor who spoke against the proposed plans repeatedly, is skeptical that the company is really walking away.

“All Navistar has said is that they will be stepping back from the zoning hearings and revisiting other locations that they previously considered,” he said. “It could very well be a strong-arm tactic to cause backlash to those who oppose elements of their proposal.”

He reiterated his wish to have Navistar put in writing the assurances it has made in public meetings.

“Many public officials were subpoenaed for these hearings, in an effort to get at the truth and determine what has gone on in the back rooms,” Wilkie said. “There is no question that Navistar has the zoning board and village board votes to get the deal done, so there are other forces at work here. The public should not be so quick to play into their hands and condemn this as a bad thing. There is a lot more to this story.”

* Indiana is now working hard to woo the company to Fort Wayne

The cost of running a combined operation in Fort Wayne would be about $33 million less annually than the cost of doing it in Lisle, according to an Ernst & Young 2009 comparison study commissioned by Navistar. The economics are in Fort Wayne’s favor, Udris said.

* This all started because parents of children attending a nearby school for autistic children were worried about about the company’s plans to build a diesel engine testing facility on-site. It snowballed into something bigger and Navistar couldn’t stop the opposition even after addressing the parents’ concerns.

What a mess this is.

- Posted by Rich Miller   53 Comments      


Analysis: Budget hole tops $7 billion

Thursday, May 27, 2010

* As I told subscribers this morning, the Center for Tax and Budget Accountability has a new report out analyzing next fiscal year’s state budget. Here’s the meat…

That means the state will have to come up with at least $3.1 billion again next year just to keep the deficit at $7 billion. And that doesn’t include the pension payments. Oy.

More from the CTBA…

After all revenue sources, recurring and non-recurring are included, Illinois’s 2011 budget deficit is 26.7% of its General Revenue Fund. Consider that over 90% of General Funds are spent on four areas: Education; Healthcare; Human Services; and Public Safety.

The General Fund is the area of the budget that elected officials have the ability to manipulate. So, if the budget is to be balanced by cutting 26.7% of spending, these four areas, all of which provide critical services to Illinoisans, will be first on the chopping block.

Under the Emergency Budget Act the Governor has been given the authority to make additional cuts in two areas: “discretionary human services” up to $ 2.2 B, and “discretionary operational and state government” up to $ 1.2 B.

In the [current] FY 2010 budget, human services (including the Departments of Aging, Children and Family Services, and Human Services) were cut by $ 2.1 B (38%) from FY 2009.

* Speaker Madigan says he’s confident that Quinn can manage the budget situation

“We overspent,” Madigan said. “We took on too much and it’s legitimate to say we’ve got to reduce thresholds. Not nickel and dime stuff, but threshold questions: Can we afford this?”

Madigan acknowledged the budget passed by the House Tuesday evening “isn’t pretty” but said borrowing and giving Quinn the responsibility to allocate next year’s funds was the legislature’s best option facing a $13 billion budget deficit.

“There’s a built-in reason why (Quinn) will do a good job managing, because if he doesn’t it will reflect poorly on his performance and he’s a candidate in a few months for election,” Madigan said.

* The AP obtained a House GOP analysis which looks at the upcoming cuts

State support for education would drop about $585 million, or nearly 8 percent, according to a House Republican analysis. Higher education would see a 4.5 percent cut. The agency that provides medical care for the poor would be cut 10.7 percent. The Department of Children and Family Services would see a 28.7 percent reduction.

The education cuts will likely be less, however

Suburban school districts already strapped for cash are bracing for major state funding cuts unless lawmakers raise the cigarette tax or Gov. Pat Quinn can find money elsewhere.

An estimated $327 million would be cut from programs under a budget plan sent to Quinn this week. Special-education funding would be cut by about $246 million and transportation by about $81 million.

Quinn has vowed to use his budget cutting powers to preserve education funding, but that’s a tall order. And the cigarette tax hike is going nowhere fast in the House right now

State Rep. John Bradley, D-Marion, said he doesn’t like the idea of higher cigarette taxes, but remains open to the concept. With the legislative session winding down, however, and a handful of lawmakers already leaving Springfield, a vote doesn’t appear imminent.

“I don’t think there’s sufficient support for that,” Bradley said.

* And Rep. Karen May tried to walk back an inflammatory comment about state retiree health insurance premiums…

Proposing that state retirees not yet old enough for Medicare should pay a portion of their own health-care premiums, May said, “They need to feel the pain.”

“I would have, could have, should have, said, ‘We must all share the pain,’” May clarified Wednesday. “If it came out differently, I apologize.”

- Posted by Rich Miller   38 Comments      


Senate not ready to vote on pension borrowing bill

Thursday, May 27, 2010

* From an e-mail sent by the Senate Democrats at around 10 this morning…

The [$3.8 billion pension payment] borrowing bill will not be called in executive committee this morning. There is still work to do.

The “work” involves rounding up the super-majority to pass it

“There are members of the Senate Democratic caucus that don’t support borrowing for the pension, so we will definitely need Republican votes,” said Rikeesha Phelon, spokeswoman for Senate President John Cullerton, D-Chicago.

That could be a major problem.

“I have been told there are no votes in the Republican caucus for borrowing,” said Sen. John Sullivan, D-Rushville, one of the Democrats’ budget negotiators. […]

Sen. Larry Bomke, R-Springfield, said Republicans have not yet taken a position on the pension borrowing bill.

“The governor called me (Tuesday). I said I will consider it. Right now, I haven’t ruled it out or decided to support it,” Bomke said.

* Meanwhile, Illinois Republican Party Chairman Pat Brady raised questions yesterday about what GOP Rep. Bob Biggins was offered in exchange for switching from “No” to “Yes” on the pension borrowing bill

Brady, the state GOP chairman, said [Republican Rep. Bill Black] was not singled out for criticism because he attended the House GOP caucus while Biggins skipped it for a meeting in Quinn’s office.

“That’s what raises questions,” Brady said. “I think questions have been raised. We just want to know.”

Biggins said Brady should call him for his reasons for voting instead of issuing critical news releases.

“When the GOP has the guts to call me and ask me why I voted for it, I’ll provide them with the answer for this fiscally responsible vote,” Biggins said. “The Republican position was fiscally unsound.”

From Brady’s press release…

“On the eve of the Blagojevich trial, Pat Quinn seems content to use the same pay-to-play politics of his former running mate. Whether secret meetings behind closed doors were held with a Democrat or Republican doesn’t matter. Governor Quinn, Rep. (David) Miller and Rep. (Bob) Biggins have some explaining to do. Just what did Quinn offer in exchange for their votes for his irresponsible borrowing plan?”

* Quinn denied there was any deal…

On Wednesday, Quinn said rumors that Biggins had been guaranteed a job in his administration were “completely ridiculous.” Asked if that meant he’d never hire Biggins even if re-elected, Quinn launched into a story.

“Bob Biggins, I’ve known him for a long, long time,” the governor said. He then related how one day years ago while attending to business at Chicago’s City Hall, he came across Biggins, who’d had a stroke. Quinn called for emergency assistance. […]

Biggins attributed his recovery to the immediate medical assistance he received.

Biggins said the story did not come up Tuesday night when he met with one of Quinn’s top aides and ultimately chose to switch his vote and support the borrowing plan.

* Gov. Quinn is also holding out on signing a bill to allow universities to borrow money while awaiting late state payments until after the pension bond bill is passed. Several Republicans represent university towns

At a press conference Wednesday, the governor was asked whether he will sign the university borrowing bill that legislators approved more than two weeks ago. Quinn said he first wants the Illinois Senate to vote on the $4 billion pension bill narrowly approved by the House on Tuesday.

“I’ll look at other borrowing after that,” Quinn said.

Quinn sent out a news release Tuesday morning saying he wanted to include the university borrowing bill in the pension legislation. He argued the comprehensive borrowing plan would bring more competitive interest rates on state bonds, lowering costs for taxpayers. The university measure was temporarily combined with the pension bill, but that amendment was later dropped.

“We’re going to address that one, and we’ll address it properly,” Quinn said Wednesday. “But front and center is the borrowing for the pensions.”

The Southern Illinoisan is not amused

Meanwhile, the one decent piece of budgetary legislation in this whole mess sits unsigned. In Carbondale, Edwardsville, Champaign, Charleston and throughout the state, state university officials wonder how they’ll pay their people this summer and fund next semester’s operations.

As SIU President Glenn Poshard has noted, the university will need about 30 days before it can get commercial paper on the market. Naturally, SIU would like to meet its July and August payroll.

Governor, we’d really appreciate if you would put the politics aside, pick up your pen and sign the university borrowing bill. The university communities do not deserve to be held hostage. And, by the way, we vote.

* Mayor Daley doesn’t like the pension borrowing plan

One day after the House approved Gov. Quinn’s $3.7 billion pension borrowing plan with help from two outgoing Republicans, Daley accused lawmakers of mortgaging Illinois’ future.

“Just like the federal government, they borrow and print money. . . . Find out how it’s gonna affect every taxpayer here. Is it gonna affect you next year, the following year, the following year? That is the big problem,” Daley said.

“If you keep borrowing money — just like foreclosure — someone has to pay it back eventually. Who’s gonna pay it back? Is it gonna be my child, my grandchild or great grandchild? That’s the big question everybody has to ask.”

* But the Sun-Times is in favor

Borrowing money to pay bills is usually a really dumb idea. But when you arrive at a place where not paying those bills is an even worse idea — and that’s the reality for the State of Illinois now — there is no other choice. […]

Though hard to fathom, borrowing is actually much cheaper for a pension system that is already one of the most underfunded in the nation.

Getting a loan to pay the $3.7 billion bill will cost the state about $1 billion over the next eight years. In contrast, skipping the payment would cost at least $20 billion in lost investment income over the next 20 years, the governor’s office estimates.

This is not how we hoped the spring legislative session would end. But we’re done dreaming. It’s time for the state Legislature to do the same and make at least one responsible choice.

- Posted by Rich Miller   6 Comments      


Morning Shorts

Thursday, May 27, 2010

* VIDEO: Storms, flooding swamp Capitol

* State’s oldest school to close to teaching

* Stroger aide Mullins denies brother got firms ‘24-9′ contracts

* College presidents urge Cook County to fix Stroger job training program

* Metra picks ex-top cop’s firm to run fraud probe

Metra appointed a firm headed by former Chicago Police Supt. Terry Hillard to run a new inspector general’s office in the wake of the discovery that its former executive director took hundreds of thousands of dollars in unauthorized pay.

The Metra board approved the interim appointment of Hillard Heintze on Wednesday to investigate fraud and abuse at the agency after Metra determined that the late Phil Pagano took $475,000 in unauthorized payments. The new office will take tips from any source, including anonymous sources, Metra said.

* RTA Breaks Silence, Says it did Conduct Metra Audit

* Top Metra official says she knows of no other illegalities

Doris also disclosed during a meeting with the Tribune’s editorial board that she rejected a suggestion that she quietly resolve the Pagano scandal rather than go public with the disclosure that he improperly took money and forged her signature to get it.

* Metra board takes steps to avoid financial scandals

* Huberman’s Update on Anti-Violence Efforts

Chicago Public Schools says fewer students have fallen victim to gun violence this school year. CEO Ron Huberman says his high-profile safety plan is beginning to work.

But that plan is barely in place.

* Beach violence alarms alderman

“We just don’t want any gang problems at the beach,” said Ald. Vi Daley (43rd), whose lakefront ward includes North Avenue beach. “Beaches are there for people to enjoy, to play volleyball, swim and walk along the beach. We want to make sure it’s a safe place for people to go.'’

Several incidents Monday have focused attention on the beach.

* Daley concerned about spate of North Avenue beach arrests

* Mayor Says Parks and Beaches are Safe After 8 Arrested In Attacks Near North Avenue Beach

* Daley: Investigation into illegal cabs ‘by no means complete’

* DuPage Water Commission changes slow in coming

First it was state Sen. Dan Cronin, R-Elmhurst, who failed in his attempt to consolidate the troubled commission under the County Board.

Now his opponent in the upcoming race for DuPage County Board chairman, Aurora Democrat Carole Cheney, is taking aim with a different tactic. Early this week, Cheney called for “more equitable representation” for municipalities on the commission. She’s referring to the seven of 12 commissioners appointed by the County Board and its chair, that is, whomever wins the November election.

* Sauk Village trustees fire police chief

* Yorkville hikes water rates over next 5 years

* Rockford leads state in DUI arrests outside Chicago

* [Naperville] near top in DUI arrests for 20th year

* Coalition taking on issues of older [Springfield] neighborhoods

* Jackson board approves raises

* First in Print program starts Sunday

Beginning Sunday, The State Journal-Register will publish some articles in the print edition first instead of publishing simultaneously in print and online.

* Congratulations to AP’s O’Connor

Covering the Capitol for The Associated Press, O’Connor’s dogged pursuit of stories and meticulous research of state records has resulted in stories of waste and mismanagement in state government that are far too numerous to list here. (For one random example, O’Connor’s comparison of travel and campaign records in January 2009 showed that former Gov. Rod Blagojevich had raised $42,000 in campaign funds the previous November during an official visit to southern Illinois, where he had traveled on a state plane.)

The AP recognized O’Connor’s work this week by awarding him its 2010 Oliver S. Gramling Journalism Award.

- Posted by Barton Lorimor   2 Comments      


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        * Illinois’ jobless rate continues 6-month decline
        * GOP’s Rauner no fan of gambling, airport slots
        * GOP’s Rauner no fan of gambling, airport slots
        * Jeb Bush headlining Chicago fundraiser for Rauner
        * Rochester resident to lead State Board of Elections

        * Scramble is on for tenants to anchor a third office tower
        * A grandmother can be CEO — or president
        * Which Chicago startup will be next with an IPO?
        * When $400 million can't buy love
        * The bleeding has stopped, but Navistar is still struggling


        * Chicago’s next archbishop Blase Cupich calls for immigration reform, shows off his humor
        * Editorial: Bishop a good fit for Chicago
        * Chicago Scots gather to await results of independence vote
        * Convicted rapist charged in 2004 murder, rape on South Side
        * Gas, electric price hike estimates lowered by northern Indiana utility
        * Hey, Mayor Rahm Emanuel, lend us your ear
        * Why Chicago excites Jimmy Fallon
        * Convicted rapist charged in 2004 murder, rape
        * Chicago’s next archbishop Blase Cupich addresses Chicago press
        * Harvey to vote on police department audit by Cook County Sheriff


        * Man dies after driving a mile following West Side shooting
        * Police: 2 arrested in city tow truck scam
        * 2 wounded in city shootings
        * Prosecutors: Gunman told fellow gang member 'I just hit a shorty'
        * Extra-alarm fire at West Side church
        * Chicago-area storm watches canceled
        * Man fatally stabbed in Gresham neighborhoood
        * Man dies after being hit by motorcycle in Romeoville
        * Spokane bishop introduced as Chicago's next archbishop
        * Missing McHenry man found dead in Kenosha lake


        * Cupich to be next Chicago archbishop
        * Treasurer Candidate Tom Cross Says He Would Sue The Legislature To Force A Balanced Budget
        * Listen to State Week - September 19, 2014
        * Quinn Defends Public Education, Though He's A Product of Private Schools
        * Chris Mooney: More Evidence-Based Policymaking Needed
        * African Drumming At Southwind Park On Saturday
        * Investors gather in Chicago seeking cannabis businesses
        * Climate, Space Create Challenges For Local Food
        * Can A Governor Really Create Jobs?
        * How do you find high school dropouts?


        * Statehouse Insider: Rauner hit with double whammy
        * Statehouse Insider: Rauner hit with double whammy
        * Bernard Schoenburg: Bull flies in 13th Congressional race
        * More than $59M collected from state retirees; refunds coming eventually
        * Jan Gambach: Recovery is possible
        * Maurine Magliocco: Education Task Force at work
        * Lawmaker wants pumpkin to be official Illinois pie
        * Deborah Davis: NFL sends mixed messages over Ray Rice case
        * Charles Krauthammer: The jihadi logic
        * Quinn: No pension ‘Plan B’ before court ruling


        * Man rescued by a Good Samaritan
        * Mixed bag of secondary matters
        * Woman makes Teddy Bears for the poor
        * Illini weather storm for win
        * Second half comeback sparks another Illini win
        * Legislation would boost apprenticeships
        * Our view
        * Graduates meet again, perhaps for the last time
        * In the grand scheme of things ... Illinois can't keep playing catchup
        * Illini grade vs. Texas State: C


        * Glenbard West overcomes challenge from Lyons Township
        * Benet waits it out, wins Dundee-Crown title
        * Day game just fine for Neuqua Valley
        * NIU loses 1st road game in 3 years to Arkansas
        * Live video: St. Edward vs. IC Catholic Prep

        * Rep. candidate pushes to uphold marriage b...
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        * Statement by Representative Jan Schakowsky...
        * FAA Rejects Call For New O'Hare Noise Stud...
        * Representatives Quigley, Duckworth, Schako...
        * Representative Jan Schakowsky Statement on...
        * Representative Jan Schakowsky Statement in...
        * Representative Jan Schakowsky Statement on...
        * Rep. Jan Schakowsky discounts threat from ...
        * Representative Jan Schakowsky Statement on...

        * NBA players attend 'Peace League' on South......
        * NBA players attend 'Peace League' on South......
        * NBA players attend 'Peace League' on South......
        * NBA players attend 'Peace League' on South......
        * NBA players attend 'Peace League' on South......

        * Diplomats: Iran receptive to softened nuke......
        * Diplomats: Iran receptive to new nuke prop......
        * Organovo Holdings, Inc. Message Board...

        * The [Tuesday] Papers
        * The Beachwood Radio Hour #24: Pussy Riot, Rahm & Rauner
        * Principal Troy LaRaviere on Chicago school policy. The public loses out and private corporations profit.
        * Solidarity with the thousands of people in NY September 21st.
        * Charon Bryson switches parties to become new 7th Ward GOP committeeman
        * Shimkus: Keeping the Internet Open and Free
        * Illinois Dems shed "little guy" persona with pricey reception for Mike Madigan
        * Rauner endorsed by the Illinois Chamber of Commerce
        * Quinn hits the airwaves as blacks consider Rauner
        * UPDATE x1: Court rules Illinois Libertarian's to remain on the ballot


        * Quinn still refusing to fire 20 political cronies
        * Illinois Chamber of Commerce Endorses Rauner for Governor
        * Rauner Web Ad: “Cut from the Same Cloth”
        * Illinois Department of Human Rights Commemorates International Day of Peace
        * Quinn Misleads Public on IDOT Again




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