SUBSCRIBE to Capitol Fax      Advertise Here      Mobile Version     Exclusive Subscriber Content     Updated Posts    Contact
CapitolFax.com
To subscribe to Capitol Fax, click here.
Abolition thoughts

Thursday, Mar 10, 2011

* A very good point by the Tribune

If there was one moment when Illinois’ death penalty began to die, it was on Feb. 5, 1999, when a man named Anthony Porter walked out of jail a free man.

Sitting in the governor’s mansion, George Ryan watched Porter’s release on television and wondered how a man could come within 50 hours of being executed, only to be set free by the efforts of a journalism professor, his students and a private investigator.

“And so I turned to my wife, and I said, how the hell does that happen? How does an innocent man sit on death row for 15 years and gets no relief,” Ryan recalled last year. “And that piqued my interest, Anthony Porter.”

To be sure, by the time Porter was set free, the foundation of Illinois’ death penalty system already had begun to erode by the steady stream of inmates who had death sentences or murder convictions vacated: Rolando Cruz and Alejandro Hernandez in the Jeanine Nicarico case, the men known as the Ford Heights Four, Gary Gauger.

Ryan placed a moratorium on executions not long afterward. Prosecutors have had 12 years since Porter was released to find a real and lasting solution to the problem of wrongful convictions. They’ve mostly had to be dragged kicking and screaming the whole way. What we saw time and again was turf protection and denial, even though dozens of people condemned to die have been found to be innocent.

There’s a prevalent notion in our society that being “soft on crime” is a bad thing. Yet, to me, stopping the government from killing innocent people isn’t about “softness,” it’s about setting limits on authority. The government abused its authority (accidentally, in many cases) for far too many years. Prosecutors and death penalty proponents probably figured - as I did - that there was almost no way the General Assembly would ever enact a repeal, so they didn’t have to worry too much about real reform. And now that the repeal has been signed into law, reform or limitation proposals have cropped up which would have been immediately dismissed out of hand as wimpy liberal claptrap just a few months ago. Too late.

I’ve been fortunate enough never to have a friend or relative murdered. One of my cousins was busted for a double-murder several years back, but, frankly, I don’t care what happens to him. I hadn’t seen him in years, don’t know where he is now and his fate just doesn’t concern me. If the abolition bill had failed and he was eventually executed, I wouldn’t have shed a tear. I figure he’s guilty and he’ll get whatever’s coming to him.

The point is, I have no sympathy at all for murderers. Nobody does. But the system obviously broke down and reform was resisted at almost every, single turn.

Jim Thompson reinstituted the death penalty back in 1977. Fourteen years later, Thompson left office without a single having dealt with just a single death penalty case arriving on his desk (and only then because the convict didn’t want to stop his own execution and rejected offers of help). The system is exceedingly slow, cumbersome, horribly expensive and fatally flawed. From the Tribune’s editorial

Quinn’s critics will point to the 15 murderers he has let off death row.

One of those inmates is Brian Dugan, who confessed to killing 10-year-old Jeanine Nicarico of Naperville in 1983. We’ve talked to more than one person who said they supported banning the death penalty but wouldn’t mind if Dugan was executed first. That sums up the mixed feelings many people shared as Quinn mulled his decision.

This would be a good time to remind ourselves that two innocent men — Rolando Cruz and Alejandro Hernandez — spent years on death row after being wrongly convicted of Nicarico’s murder. That’s a powerful rebuttal to prosecutors’ argument that banning the death penalty robs them of the only appropriate punishment for the worst crimes. Justice isn’t served if the wrong person pays, especially with his or her life.

It’s also a good time to remind ourselves that, through all the twists and turns in that case, Brian Dugan remains alive 28 years after that terrible murder. If Quinn had vetoed this repeal, Dugan would still live many more years before he met the executioner–if he ever did. The death penalty has hardly been swift and sure punishment.

That’s exactly right.

* Roundup…

* Lawmakers proposing legislation to reinstate capital punishment

* Downstate lawmakers: Death penalty repeal was wrong

* Quinn’s death penalty ban outrages victims’ families

* Victim Of Former Death Row Inmate Not Happy With Repeal

* Politicians, prosecutors react to Quinn ending death penalty

* Prosecutors: We’ve lost leverage without threat of death penalty

* Local officials react to abolishment of death penalty

* T. Scott Webb disappointed by Quinn’s decision

* Prosecutors pan Quinn’s abolishing death penalty

* The 15 death row inmates and when they were sent there

* Death penalty ban could affect extradition

* Death penalty’s opponent almost killed

* Death penalty abolished in Illinois: Coleman attorney calls Quinn’s decision ‘historic’ and ‘appropriate’

* Editorial: Death penalty repeal a victory for justice

* Gov. Pat Quinn turned to Bible and writings of late Cardinal Joseph Bernardin for difficult death penalty decision

* State’s last execution: An unforgettable moment

- Posted by Rich Miller        


45 Comments
  1. - Downstate Illinois - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 10:14 am:

    Now we will have dangerous violent people who should have been executed back walking the streets. Life in prison has never meant life in prison, not even 80 years ago when it just meant 20 to 25 years. This administration has already shown us its willingness to let violent offenders go free early. This bill is all but an act of violence against prison guards, especially since liberals are already targeting the next extreme step in punishment, the Tamms supermax.


  2. - OneMan - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 10:21 am:

    I don’t have a problem with ending it. Our batting average was horrible and one innocent person put to death in my name by state would have been too many.


  3. - wordslinger - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 10:25 am:

    –Now we will have dangerous violent people who should have been executed back walking the streets–

    Everyone who was on Death Row got life without parole. They won’t be on the streets.


  4. - dave - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 10:35 am:

    Now we will have dangerous violent people who should have been executed back walking the streets.

    Do you know what “without parole” means?


  5. - Stones - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 10:36 am:

    Undoubtedly the system is broken but I am having trouble with the blanket communtation of all prisoners on death row. My understanding is that there are 15 persons who most recently were set for execution. My feeling is that these cases should have been reviewed on a case by case basis.


  6. - CircularFiringSquad - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 10:41 am:

    A. Apparently Downdtate Illinois is not big on reading.

    B. The comment about the Cruz prosecutors does not do credit to the really evil and malicious work of jimRYAN and BrickHeadJoe. Their reckless efforts should be reason enough to ban the death penalty in this and every other state.

    BTW it is worth noting that the dude recently convicted of various crimes and i.d’d as a Rezko crony was also a big time contributor to jR and The Brick.
    Funny coincidence …huh


  7. - question? - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 10:42 am:

    Stones

    If you believe that then you undercut the logic of abolishing the death penalty. No matter how many reviews that you do one of those 15 could be innocent. So, since we are human and make mistakes the logic follows that humans don’t have the ability to make those decisions.

    Now I am waiting for all these death penalty opponents to lead the charge on abortion. That humans don’t have that ability to make that CHOICE… but I doubt it!


  8. - Honest Abe - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 10:43 am:

    @Dave:

    For Nathan Leopold, a sentence of “Life plus 99 years” meant about thirty-five years for a murder/kidnapping. Nobody seemed to care that the sentencing judge did not want him to be paroled.


  9. - mokenavince - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 10:45 am:

    Bravo for a thoughtful article. It really makes you think, just how tough a decision this was. If they are all sent to Tamms, it won’t be a picnic
    for the lot of them. May God Bless the the people they killed.


  10. - Secret Square - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 10:47 am:

    “Thompson left office without a single death penalty case arriving on his desk”

    Not quite. If I remember correctly, the very first execution under the new law (Charles Walker) took place in 1990 while Thompson was still in office. Walker wanted to die and had refused all appeals, which speeded up the process in his case.


  11. - Stones - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 10:48 am:

    Question?

    It will never be a perfect system. That being said each one of these folks have been tried by a jury of their peers and found to be guilty. My statement only favors a review of those 15 cases. I don’t think that is an unreasonable position.

    As far as your abortion comment…..not relevant to the discussion.


  12. - Ghost - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 10:50 am:

    I was thinking about this whole deterrent idea the other day. it occurs to me that the overwhelming majority of murders appear to me to be committed by people who either have a mental imbalance or are under the influence. Do we think a sociopath is less likely to kill somon becuase of the penalty? often times killers are choosing to live outside our laws and social structure.

    Do we really think a killer is restrained over fear of a eath penalty, but unrestarianed over the prospect of life in prison without parol? Is a long slow agaonizing death by age in a prison a rosy picture compared to execution?


  13. - question? - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 10:59 am:

    I respect your position. As far as my comment being relevant; that would be up to the individual to decide.

    I support the DP on limited cases. It is an issue, as is abortion, when looked at from a moral perspective that poses a lot of paradoxes. There has been a lot of arrogance on this issue, A lot of victims have been personally affected. When people bring that up… some on here will google for insults and then direct it at them.
    I happen to be pro-choice on abortion. And pro- civil unions.


  14. - howie - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 11:01 am:

    My view of this issue is admittedly quite narrow. I’m a 22 yr. DOC employee. I’ve been amongst the worst for years. I believe there are certain crimes that deserve nothing short of death. All you have to do is look at the summary of the 15 who just had their death sentences commuted. DOC has stated they will be returned to general population. That’s not Tamms CC. The individuals who are now serving life in prison with no possibility of parole now have absolutely no deterrent to keep them from slitting mine, or any other DOC employee, or inmate’s throat. They’ve already been sentenced to the max.


  15. - Stones - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 11:04 am:

    No worries Question? I respect your opinion as well! I appreciate the good discussion and differing points of view.

    As I tell my friends - there is a reason that Baskin-Robbins has 31 flavors :)


  16. - amalia - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 11:06 am:

    Prosecutors like Anita Alvarez and James McKay deserve more credit than blanket statements that prosecutors fought against reforms. They remain in the thick of fighting for justice and know the consequences. In fact, McKay’s quote in today’s Tribune bears watching, “I do not believe for one second that taking the death penalty off the table will save the State of Illinois any money whatsoever.” Only time will tell if resources are spent trying to get the convicted off a sentence of life without parole.


  17. - question? - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 11:06 am:

    Howie..

    So will these inmates that are serving life be treated any different than other inmates. Also, I have read a lot on Tamms, is it true that they are softening the rules to make it easier on inmates.
    Finally, I appreciate you all of the staff working in prisons.


  18. - howie - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 11:12 am:

    question?….It’s too early to tell if they’ll be treated differently. I don’t see how DOC could keep them isolated, there just isn’t enough room. They’ve been talking about reforms at Tamms for a while now, and I’ve had dealings with several current Tamms inmates over the years, before they were sent there. They don’t get sent there for being nice guys.


  19. - question? - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 11:12 am:

    Howie

    One more question. Can these inmates be transferred to community centers?


  20. - Old Hand - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 11:12 am:

    Secret Square is correct, Gov. Thompson had at least one execution occur during his tenure.


  21. - howie - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 11:15 am:

    question?….I seriously doubt it.. There’s no way they could meet the security guidelines.


  22. - dave - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 11:15 am:

    @Honest Abe - let me ask you again:

    Do you know what “without parole” means? Leopold didn’t receive a “without parole” sentence.


  23. - piling on - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 11:27 am:

    Charles Walker was executed Sept. 12, 1990.
    Here’s the top of the AP story on the lead up …

    CHICAGO, Sept. 10 (AP) - Gov. James R. Thompson refused today to commute the death sentence of Charles Walker, a convicted murderer, removing one of the last barriers to Mr. Walker’s scheduled execution this week.

    ‘’The imposition of the death penalty in this case is appropriate,'’ the Governor said in a news conference here. ‘’I think Mr. Walker has put himself to death; I’m simply not standing in the way.'’

    Mr. Walker, 50, has repeatedly asked that no further steps be taken to prevent or delay his execution by injection on Wednesday. He was sentenced for the 1983 murder of a young couple in Mascoutah, Ill., in a $40 robbery.


  24. - Rich Miller - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 11:31 am:

    piling on, that’s why I said there was nothing on his desk.


  25. - Honest Abe - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 11:47 am:

    Actually, the terms of Leopold’s sentence were subsequently “modified” while he was serving his prison sentence, so he became eligible for parole board consideration. It would take too long to explain the details here, but a life sentence “without parole” in Illinois does not always mean that to future politicians with the power to modify sentences.


  26. - frustrated GOP - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 12:03 pm:

    What gets me is Ryan gave the GA a chance to fix the system and they did nothing, officers of the court elected to deal with justice, did nothing, they left him no choice to do what he did. We can’t fix our justice system to a point where we can institute such a punishment. Yes, some people are not worth the bullet,let along all the resources we would give them to make sure we got the right person. If this was a car it would have been recalled along time ago. If it was a manufacturing system it would have been adjusted or scrapped. Why do we allow for less in our justice system?


  27. - MrJM - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 12:07 pm:

    Now we will have dangerous violent people who should have been executed back walking the streets.

    Rubbish. (Please note that I supplied just as much support for my counter-argument as you supplied for your initial assertion)

    – MrJM


  28. - dave - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 12:07 pm:

    **It would take too long to explain the details here, but a life sentence “without parole” in Illinois does not always mean that to future politicians with the power to modify sentences. **

    I am aware of that, but that is true whether the state has the death penalty or not.


  29. - Dirty Red - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 12:15 pm:

    I know the author of this article very well. I made up my mind about capital punishment after watching him go through all of this:
    http://dailyherald.com/article/20110125/discuss/701259928/


  30. - jake - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 12:24 pm:

    I thought there was nothing new to say against the death penalty, until I saw that one prosecutor argued that the death penalty threat was necessary to force suspects to forego their right to a trial. By that logic one could justify torture too. But the logic is wrong. The right to a trial is as close to sacred as any secular consideration can be.


  31. - dupage dan - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 12:27 pm:

    I, too, worry about the maleable nature of long prison sentences. The capricious nature of parole boards should worry us as much as the over-zealous nature of some prosecutors. All it will take, frankly, is for a clemency petition being honored and the recently released person expressing their gratitude by commiting some other horrific crime to send the electorate on the warpath to have the DP re-instated. There is no perfect system. I wish there was.

    Frankly, looking at Dugan’s most recent mugshot gives me the whillies. I, too, wish that we had kept the DP until he had been dispatched. However, let’s remember our time line, shall we? If the overzealous prosecutor (Jim Ryan) had heeded the call for a review of the facts in the case and had prosecuted the real culprit, Dugan would have been convicted in plenty of time to have been executed before this most recent DP review. Ryan MAY be given a mulligan for the first trial vs Cruz, but the second one was a travesty of justice. Ryan just couldn’t let go of Cruz, for whatever reason, and this (IMO) had a major impact on his political career.

    Regarding the DP, however, that horrific mess caused me, and many others, to question the use of the DP in Illinois. Ryan, and others, were so much in the grip of some fixated tunnel vision that they pursued Cruz when ALL reason pointed to Dugan, and Dugan alone. The prosecutors were the makers of their own defeat.


  32. - Wilson Pickett - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 1:01 pm:

    Just out of curiousity, how much does it cost the Illinois taxpayers per year to keep a man with a “life sentence” in prison? I realize that there will be variances within the state prison system on the figure but even a “rough estimate” will do. Then, what if an individual readily acknowledges that he was responsible for multiple pre-planned murders and states that he will kill again (perhaps someone within the prison system) if he is able to do so? Should Illinois taxpayers be forced to accept the economic cost of “a blanket policy” where “one size fits all”? To me, the economic enormity of the issue would lead me to think that perhaps we should “temporarily postpone all executions” until further “thorough study” of the issue is made. Nobody wants to put an innocent man to death. Nor do I think that anyone wants to play the role of “Motel Eight” for a Richard Speck-type of monster.


  33. - Rich Miller - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 1:04 pm:

    WP, we have 15 people on death row and the state has spent well over $100 million during the past ten years on their defense. You do the math. Then add in incarceration charges, which are substantially higher for death row.


  34. - Top of State - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 1:07 pm:

    Did the Governor evoke Lincoln on this issue? If so, Abe approved the hanging of several Indians in Minnesota (for insurrection) during the Civil War. Effectively, we are removing the ultimate form of punishment with a “time out”. That is not justice for the victims.


  35. - Bungalow Billy - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 1:11 pm:

    The problem with the Death Penaly is elections. Elections of State’s Attorney’s and legislators. Even if we took the decision out of the hands of local prosecutors and had statewide panels to determine which cases should qualify, the legislators would overreact to a particular situation in response to headlines or whatever. Life or death is simply too important to leave in the hands of humans, especially elected ones.


  36. - VanillaMan - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 1:19 pm:

    I am pro-life on all issues.
    You do not allow your government to take away your most precious gift. I believe in redemption. Keep them locked up until He decides when they are to be brought to the ultimate justice.


  37. - piling on - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 1:37 pm:

    In some since, this is about as anti-MGT Push as you can get.
    See, Quinn’s learning.


  38. - D.P. Gumby - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 1:49 pm:

    top of state—Lincoln famously issued clemency throughout the war.
    http://ednet.rvc.cc.il.us/~PeterR/Papers/paper4.htm
    He allowed execution of 39 Sioux, but pardoned 260.


  39. - dupage dan - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 1:59 pm:

    Top of State,

    Yes, PQ did evoke AL when he signed the bill.

    Sigh…….

    Do not agree on the whole time out thing. I know people who have had short stints in prison. Not pleasant at all. If it were so much fun, why aren’t we all breaking the law just so we can have 3 hots and a cot free of charge? Sure beats foreclosure, eh?


  40. - Phineas J. Whoopee - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 3:47 pm:

    Jesus said it would be better to tie a millstone around your neck and drown yourself in the sea than to lead one of his little ones astray.

    The death penalty should be reserved for the most heinous of criminals. The Dahmers, Gacy’s and Dugans ect. They are worthless and should be put down.


  41. - Rich Miller - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 3:49 pm:

    ===The Dahmers, Gacy’s and Dugans ect. ===

    You do realize the supreme irony of including Dugan in that comment, don’t you?


  42. - Phineas J. Whoopee - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 4:02 pm:

    I guess my point is there are crimes so bad even Jesus thought society would be better off without the criminals alive.

    As far as irony, just because there were two wrongs doesn’t mean you shouldn’t get it right.


  43. - Secret Square - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 4:09 pm:

    Consider for a moment what might have occurred had there been no moratorium and death row inmates had been coming due for execution on a regular basis during the Blago administration. Considering how Blago handled (or more precisely, failed to handle) other types of clemency petitions, I shudder to think what he might have done when faced with an actual life or death decision.

    As much as many of these inmates deserve death, given our state’s track record of incompetent and corrupt executives, I’m kind of relieved they at least won’t have THAT power anymore.


  44. - 47th Ward - Thursday, Mar 10, 11 @ 5:02 pm:

    ===there are crimes so bad even Jesus thought society would be better off without the criminals alive===

    I’m no Biblical scholar, PJW, but I recall Jesus being a victim of capital punishment, not a proponent of it.


  45. - wordslinger - Friday, Mar 11, 11 @ 8:46 am:

    Scott Turow has an excellent column today that should give “conservatives” peace of mind on abolition.

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/ct-oped-0310-turow-20110310,0,7368692.story


Sorry, comments for this post are now closed.


* Reader comments closed for the weekend
* *** UPDATED *** THIS JUST IN... Judge orders permanent stay on pension law
* Today's number: 10 percent
* Unclear on the concept
* Could be a big day
* Question of the day
* Illinois leaders react to Obama's immigration order
* TrackBill – An Introduction
* Caption contest!
* SUBSCRIBERS ONLY - Today's edition of Capitol Fax (use all CAPS in password)
* Yesterday's blog posts

Support CapitolFax.com
Visit our advertisers...

...............

...............

...............

...............

...............

...............

...............


Search This Blog...

Search the 98th General Assembly By Bill Number
(example: HB0001)

Search the 98th General Assembly By Keyword

          
        * Our 5 favorite new Windows Phone apps of the week
        * Jolla’s Open Source iPad Alternative Raises More Than $1M In Two Days’ Crowdfunding
        * Apple Watch price, Lollipop updates, MS Office mobile comments & more – Pocketnow Daily Recap
        * Google’s Nexus 6 Might Be Too Big For Right Now, But Right-Sized For The Future
        * You Should Play: Monster Strike is a delightful mashup of monster battles and pinball
        * HTC Desire Eye Review: Welcome to the (selfie) machine
        * The Week in iPad Cases: Extra storage, ultra rugged, and everything in between

        * Pantelligent Is A Smart Frying Pan To Help You Cook Food Perfectly (Video)
        * Sony Xperia Z3 Tablet Compact Now Available for Sale in Canada for $529.99
        * Give Your Internet Service Provider Less Money, Get a SURFboard SB1683 Instead
        * Swiftkey for Android Updated With Performance Improvements and New Language Support
        * Sony Alpha 7 II Is Their First Handheld Camera With 5-Axis Stabilization
        * White Blackberry Passport Goes Up for Pre-order, Expected to Launch In The UK on December 8th
        * Luxurious Gifts for Hard-to-Impress People + Win the LG G3 Smartphone for AT&T

        * Terrerobytes: Waiting for Adam LaRoche
        * With LaRoche on board, Abreu will benefit
        * Sources: White Sox land LaRoche with two-year deal
        * Sources: White Sox land LaRoche with two-year deal
        * Sources: White Sox land LaRoche with two-year deal
        * Abreu will benefit from LaRoche's presence
        * White Sox sign Adam LaRoche to two-year, $25 million deal

        ...............


        Main Menu
        Home
        Illinois
        YouTube
        Pundit rankings
        Obama
        Subscriber Content
        Durbin
        Burris
        Blagojevich Trial
        Advertising
        Updated Posts
        Polls

        Archives
        November 2014
        October 2014
        September 2014
        August 2014
        July 2014
        June 2014
        May 2014
        April 2014
        March 2014
        February 2014
        January 2014
        December 2013
        November 2013
        October 2013
        September 2013
        August 2013
        July 2013
        June 2013
        May 2013
        April 2013
        March 2013
        February 2013
        January 2013
        December 2012
        November 2012
        October 2012
        September 2012
        August 2012
        July 2012
        June 2012
        May 2012
        April 2012
        March 2012
        February 2012
        January 2012
        December 2011
        November 2011
        October 2011
        September 2011
        August 2011
        July 2011
        June 2011
        May 2011
        April 2011
        March 2011
        February 2011
        January 2011
        December 2010
        November 2010
        October 2010
        September 2010
        August 2010
        July 2010
        June 2010
        May 2010
        April 2010
        March 2010
        February 2010
        January 2010
        December 2009
        November 2009
        October 2009
        September 2009
        August 2009
        July 2009
        June 2009
        May 2009
        April 2009
        March 2009
        February 2009
        January 2009
        December 2008
        November 2008
        October 2008
        September 2008
        August 2008
        July 2008
        June 2008
        May 2008
        April 2008
        March 2008
        February 2008
        January 2008
        December 2007
        November 2007
        October 2007
        September 2007
        August 2007
        July 2007
        June 2007
        May 2007
        April 2007
        March 2007
        February 2007
        January 2007
        December 2006
        November 2006
        October 2006
        September 2006
        August 2006
        July 2006
        June 2006
        May 2006
        April 2006
        March 2006
        February 2006
        January 2006
        December 2005
        April 2005
        March 2005
        February 2005
        January 2005
        December 2004
        November 2004
        October 2004

        Blog*Spot Archives
        November 2005
        October 2005
        September 2005
        August 2005
        July 2005
        June 2005
        May 2005

        Syndication

        RSS Feed 2.0
        Comments RSS 2.0
        WordPress

        Loading


        * Honors For Yonkers Resident Pat Quinn Tops News.....
        * Rauner Says Financial Condition "Horrible"..
        * 'Hoops for Peace' tournament aims to curb viole.....
        * Money cant buy Christie love - Politico..
        * Illinois' Rauner tackles full transition agenda.....
        * Finke: Let's hope Rauner has some good pension .....


        * Illinois' Rauner tackles full transition agenda
        * Immigrants urged to take advantage of Obama action
        * Door County fish business subject of federal probe
        * Springfield firefighter arrested for wielding gun
        * Pekin man sentenced for dealing deadly heroin
        * Attorney general warns of immigration scams
        * Suspect in 2011 slaying enters guilty plea
        * New study shows impact of military in Illinois
        * Congressman says he still deciding what to do next
        * Judge rules Illinois pension law unconstitutional

        * Rauner tackles transition agenda
        * Attorney general warns of immigration scams
        * State pension changes ruled unconstitutional; appeal to Illinois Supreme Court next
        * State to refund $60 million in retiree health care money
        * State pension changes ruled unconstitutional; appeal to Illinois Supreme Court likely
        * Illinois pension case likely headed to high court
        * Judge: Pension ruling to come Friday
        * Rauner mum on fixes for ‘dire’ state finances, wants Quinn to freeze hiring
        * Rauner mum on fixes for ‘dire’ state finances
        * Judge to hear pension law arguments today

        * AndroGel giving AbbVie performance anxiety
        * Turning the kitchen into a tech hot spot
        * What does Michael Madigan do next?
        * Are Chicago's manufacturing districts vulnerable?
        * United's Smisek back in analysts' good graces


        * University of Chicago’s Dr. Donald F. Steiner, pioneer in diabetes research, dead at 84
        * University of Chicago’s Dr. Donald F. Steiner, pioneer in diabetes research, dead at 84
        * Time for all-new plan on pensions
        * University of Chicago’s Dr. Donald F. Steiner, pioneer in diabetes research, dead at 84
        * University of Chicago’s Dr. Donald F. Steiner, pioneer in diabetes research, dead at 84
        * Police: Girl, 10, struck by drunk driver who fled scene
        * Business owners seeking pot shop licenses in Illinois faced lawsuits elsewhere
        * Illinois pension reform law is unconstitutional, judge rules
        * Dr. Lawrence Solomon: Renowned dermatologist, book collector loved a mystery
        * 3 Daley scandals cost Chicago taxpayers over $6 million


        * Blaze in Woodstock stable kills up to 32 horses
        * Police warn of robberies in Lake View neighborhood
        * 5 injured in shootings, including 2 teens, on South, West side
        * Mag Mile Lights Festival: 'Nice to start the holiday season'
        * Teens address top city issues at annual speech competition
        * Emanuel: 'What the president did was create an opportunity'
        * $900K bail for man accused in fatal East Hyde Park shooting
        * Impaired Divvy bicyclist hit by 2 cars on Lake Shore Drive
        * Tourist robbed at gunpoint near Buckingham Fountain
        * Slain woman was thoughtful colleague, co-workers say


        * Listen to State Week - November 21, 2014
        * State To Refund Retiree Health Care Money
        * Labor unions celebrate judge's ruling against Illinois pension law
        * Judge Finds Reductions In Pension Benefits Unconstitutional
        * Pension Ruling Imminent
        * Hoosiers divided over Obama’s executive action on immigration
        * Illinois Symphony Orchestra Joins The Circus For Holiday Pops
        * School Funding Testimony Taken At Capitol
        * Incoming U of I President Speaks To Springfield Audience
        * To Restore Executive Mansion, Rauner Plans Private Funds


        * Our Opinion: Illiana project too risky for tapped-out Illinois
        * Bernard Schoenburg: Sen. Manar backs aide Watson over Cahnman, Proctor in Ward 5
        * Karen Cox: Shop for a cause
        * Andy Shaw: Protect Illinois’ FOIA law from unnecessary tinkering
        * Quote of the Day: Sunday, Nov. 23, 2014
        * Rauner tackles transition agenda
        * Attorney general warns of immigration scams
        * Deckle McLean: Plagiarism comes with a price
        * Charles Krauthammer: The climate pact swindle
        * Quote of the Day: Nov. 22, 2014


        * Top of the Morning, Nov. 23, 2014
        * Enterprise zone could welcome new projects
        * Area Calendar 11/23/14
        * Civil War Timeline: The Story of Pvt. Henry Pickle
        * Common traits among kids who kill
        * 112314-dec-loc-dombatt
        * Youngster sets course for record books
        * Downtown Decatur events usher in holiday season
        * Rauner filling out administration
        * Plane prepped for final landing spot


        * Loud and proud, Cary-Grove's headed downstate
        * Families get coats, food from Lake Zurich church
        * Minnesota survives test from UMBC
        * Rhode Island upsets No. 21 Nebraska
        * Freshman leads Indiana past Lamar, 85-72

        * Patrick Cannon defense strategy rare but n...
        * Feds fine Jesse Jackson Jr.'s campaign com...
        * Ex-Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. faces sen...
        * Representative Jan Schakowsky Sends Letter...
        * Rep. candidate pushes to uphold marriage b...
        * Reps. Schakowsky and Waxman Introduce Bill...
        * Statement by Representative Jan Schakowsky...
        * U.S. House Passes Resolution Condemning An...
        * FAA Rejects Call For New O'Hare Noise Stud...
        * Representatives Quigley, Duckworth, Schako...

        * Durbin, Corker Introduce Water for The Wor......
        * Durbin, Corker Introduce Water for The Wor......
        * Durbin, Corker Introduce Water for The Wor......
        * Durbin, Corker Introduce Water for The Wor......
        * Durbin, Corker Introduce Water for The Wor......

        * Algonquin chief recommended to be next U.S......

        * Tower of Power
        * Tribune: 'Vulnerable' cafe makes a stand in a tough part of town
        * Duckworth-Bowlsbey welcome new baby girl
        * WWI-themed Christmas ad goes viral
        * State Rep. Andre Thapedi HR1348 Press ReleaseClir
        * State Rep. Andre Thapedi HR1348 Press Release
        * Going to GRI in Peoria? Find session schedules #ILGRIturns50
        * IAR Government Affairs monitors veto session
        * Coming Thursday: Illinois October Home Sales Report
        * Infographic: October Illinois Housing Snapshot #IARMarketStats


        * Illinois Residents Asked to Put the Tobacco Down - Support the Great American Smokeout – November 20
        * Governor Quinn Statement on President Obama’s Executive Action
        * Governor Quinn Statement on Selection of New University of Illinois President
        * Governor Quinn Statement on Senate Committee Passage of Minimum Wage Legislation
        * Governor Quinn Statement on the Installation of Archbishop Blase Cupich




            Hosted by MCS SUBSCRIBE to Capitol Fax Advertise Here Mobile Version Contact Rich Miller