SUBSCRIBE to Capitol Fax      Advertise Here      Mobile Version     Exclusive Subscriber Content     Updated Posts    Contact
CapitolFax.com
To subscribe to Capitol Fax, click here.
Today’s numbers: 4 million and 20,000

Friday, May 16, 2014

* If true, that’s almost a third of the state’s population

Approximately 4 million people in Illinois currently have some type of arrest or conviction record that would show up on a routine background check, said Anthony Lowery, director of policy and advocacy with the Chicago-based Safer Foundation, an organization focused on reducing recidivism rates.

“You may find a few employers who may understand the need for providing second chances, but the majority of employers don’t,” he stressed. “This has been a long-standing battle over the years to just level the playing field [and] provide people who show that they’ve rehabilitated their lives the opportunity to just work. I think the simplicity of work is the most direct link to reduce recidivism, saving taxpayers in this state millions of dollars in the associated costs of incarceration.”

Illinois already prohibits state agencies from asking about criminal history on initial government job applications. Job applicants no longer have to check a box on state employment applications indicating whether they have pled guilty to or been convicted of any criminal offense other than a minor traffic violation.

* On to our second number

Under the Juvenile Court Act, both arrest and court records for juveniles in Illinois are confidential and sealed. That sounds pretty off-limits. So why should people have to spend time and money to expunge juvenile records, if they’re already protected? […]

These are jobs in which the application form will typically include a request for authorization to run a background check. Once a prospective employer sees that, “even while you may figure that these records are sealed and you don’t have to worry about them,” Hamann said, “there’s a whole number of exceptions where it’s within their right and it’s commonplace for them to consider juvenile arrest records.”

He says that includes the Chicago Park District and many government jobs. […]

In 2013 there were about 26,000 juvenile arrests in Cook County. A little over 20,000 of those were arrests that never led to formal criminal charges. Now, bear in mind that juvenile records can’t be expunged until a person turns 18. So each year you have people in the pipeline, coming of age, who are eligible for those expungements. But as you see in the chart above, in 2013, there were only 660 juvenile records expunged in all of Cook County.

- Posted by Rich Miller        


38 Comments
  1. - fed up - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 11:52 am:

    Illinois already prohibits state agencies from asking about criminal history on initial government job applications. Job applicants no longer have to check a box on state employment applications indicating whether they have pled guilty to or been convicted of any criminal offense other than a minor traffic violation.

    Cant wait for Jessie Jr to get a job in Pat Quinns Illinois state budget office when he gets out.


  2. - Federalist - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 12:10 pm:

    What are the types of truly ‘low level crimes’ are recorded that would have 4 million people in Illinois on such roles.

    I presume that very low levels of pot use would be among those, but that certainly should not count for this many people. And of that 4 million how many are from juvenile records.

    I am really interested in this and would like more complete information. If anyone knows, please respond.


  3. - RonOglesby - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 12:19 pm:

    I love the “level the playing field quote”

    You mean make someone with some criminal background = with someone who has not made those poor choices. Got it.


  4. - Rich Miller - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 12:20 pm:

    RonOglesby, so you’re arguing that people who have paid their debt to society by completing their punishment be punished for the rest of their lives - perhaps over mistakes made when they were teens?


  5. - crazybleedingheart - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 12:25 pm:

    A third of the population having been arrested is the new normal. Check the google.


  6. - Jake From Elwood - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 12:28 pm:

    I don’t believe that 1/3 of our citizens have criminal convictions on our records unless you are including minor traffic violations.
    Look, 6.3% of our state are persons under 5 years old. The figure is mere puffery.


  7. - crazybleedingheart - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 12:37 pm:

    arrests are not convictions


  8. - Rich Miller - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 12:38 pm:

    And your point is what?


  9. - DuPage Dave - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 12:41 pm:

    Incarceration is a big business, both for the government and increasingly for the private sector. Disputes and low-level infractions that used to be dealt with by street cops or a sergeant at the station now become formal charges and are sent on to the prosecutors.

    Our country incarcerates a greater percentage of its population than any other nation. Being number one is nothing to be proud of in this case.

    I have to say I’m disturbed to see that juvenile records might not really be as private as believed. Illinois led the nation in treating juvenile offenders differently from adults over 100 years ago. I hope this report is exaggerated.


  10. - mythoughtis - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 12:44 pm:

    Notice it said ‘arrest’ records separately from cconvictions. Often arrests are made, but no charges are filed because the circumstances don’t warrent it. To me, arrests without charges should be automatically expunged for everyone at the end of the statute of limitations perod. Why should you have to ask for those to go away?


  11. - Jake From Elwood - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 12:49 pm:

    It is illegal to discriminate against someone for an arrest record in hiring decisions but not illegal to consider criminal convictions (unless it is expunged or subject to an executive pardon). Referring to the number of people who are arrested rather than convicted is a red herring.


  12. - crazybleedingheart - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 12:54 pm:

    Rich, Are you asking me? My point is that Jake from Elwood is protesting the truth of something that nobody said.

    He’s also claiming on the basis of nothing that the numbers offered are “puffery” - again, this WHILE failing to distinguish between arrest and conviction (pretty major distinction given the number of tossed arrests, including 8 of 10 misdemeanor arrests in Chicago).

    http://www.chicagoreporter.com/open-and-shut#.U3ZPXfldUeE

    But this is not just a big city thing, nor is it just a race thing. Nationwide, 40% of white males get arrested at least once by the time they’re 23.

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-01/uosc-sho010314.php


  13. - Precinct Captain - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 12:56 pm:

    ==Cant wait for Jessie Jr to get a job in Pat Quinns Illinois state budget office when he gets out.==

    You’re insane and for the purpose of drive-by comments ignore background checks, interviews, and secondary applications.

    Anyway, the punishment control complex is spiraling out of control, but it has an effect on some people more than others. For example, there is Devah Pager’s research that white felons receive more job callbacks than black non-criminals (controlling for work experience and education level). There are also the myriad ways in which the incarcerated and recently incarcerated are left off our various statistical measures (Becky Petit’s book Invisible Men).

    When we are talking about these issues, it is also helpful to realize where the roots of some of these draconian laws come from. In the case of some our minor crimes, such as malicious mischief, the roots come directly the racism of the society reflected through the state and in others it is simply the idea of long incarcerations for petty theft, etc.


  14. - Jake From Elwood - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 12:57 pm:

    Mythoughtis, I agree, but really folks can expunge non-convictions pretty easily. However, like most things in this social media age, once the arrest is out there, it is difficult to remove all traces of it. And I would bet that some employers continue to treat arrests and convictions alike, even though there is a clear legal distinction.


  15. - A guy... - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 1:03 pm:

    Maybe this was part of the effort to keep all those downstate jails open. (obvious snark, Rich said to lighten up) lol


  16. - Jake From Elwood - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 1:09 pm:

    Crazy-
    If arrests are included as well as convictions, the 4 million figure, I may have been rash to criticize it as puffery, but it is still flawed.

    For example, the document you cite includes arrests for things like truancy and underage consumption of alcohol.

    Also, if folks fail to avail themselves of the relatively simple and inexpensive process to get their non-convictions expunged, shame on them. This is a smart action to consider before applying for a new job. One wonders how many of the alleged “4 million” fall into that category.


  17. - Anonymous - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 1:10 pm:

    as a trade union member i have been denied work at schools and sewer plants for a 35 year old charge, your debt to societey will never be paid


  18. - Anon - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 1:26 pm:

    If we believe in redemption and second chances, then the punishment should be incarceration or fines, not a lifetime of legal discrimination, not just in employment, but in housing, in dog ownership, in federal college grants, and so on. In short, give people a real second chance, a real chance at redemption, which every Christian believes he has gotten from God.


  19. - wordslinger - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 1:32 pm:

    Arrests that don’t result in convictions should automatically be expunged.


  20. - girllawyer - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 1:33 pm:

    Many people who have juvenile records don’t realize they have to take action to get the record expunged. I guess that because juvenile records are (mostly) confidential, they assume the records just disappear eventually. As was noted, they do not.


  21. - RonOglesby - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 1:41 pm:

    @Rich,
    no, they have paid their DEBT. THey are no longer in jail, home confinement, or owe society any money.

    BUT to say that they are now completely equal and their own history does not matter simply does not work. Two equal candidates. One with a criminal history one with out. It may come down to that. And it is a valid look at someone’s character.

    On the other hand I have an uncle that did 2 years when we was 18-20 years old for his mistake. It took him 10-15 years of working and building references so that it no longer mattered. He had PROVEN it was a one time thing.

    Simply saying “all people are equal” doesnt work. These items in people’s history can mean things.


  22. - Federalist - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 1:46 pm:

    Arrests with conviction should be automatically and quickly expunged from all records. The reality that this is not done is ridiculous. Of course ,some arrests lead to lesser plea bargained convictions- those would stand.

    As to juveniles, this is so tricky. Some juveniles are really dangerous and probably always will be. To ignore that a juvenile has been convicted of a very serious crime seems rather dangerous for society. However, I still lean to expunging juvenile records unless they are convicted as an adult. Then the entire juvenile and adult record should be available.

    That’s my opinion.


  23. - Demoralized - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 1:50 pm:

    @Ron:

    You contradicted yourself. On the one hand you said that it should matter, and in the next statement said your uncle proved it no longer mattered. Which is it?

    If a person has paid their debt then why hold it over their head for the rest of their lives? People change. You don’t look at potentially one bad incident in somebody’s lives and say then use that to question their character for the rest of their lives.

    I’m glad your perfect. Most of us aren’t.


  24. - In the Middle - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 2:10 pm:

    I strongly agree with Rich.

    RonOglesby… What gives? A guy pays his debt and is never equal?

    What kinda position is that nonsense? Either they paid their debt or they didn’t. And if they did, it’s quite simple–they’re on equal footing with the rest of us.


  25. - Leave a Light on George - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 2:12 pm:

    To all those that made statements like this..

    “Arrests that don’t result in convictions should automatically be expunged”

    Be careful what you wish for.

    Do you want someone with 4 or 5 DUI arrests but only 1 conviction hired for a job that requires operating a vehicle?

    Do you want someone with several arrests for financial crimes that were dismissed or reduced to something minor in charge of grant money?

    How about an arrest for child porn that gets reduced to something less onerous. Want them hired as juvenile counselor?

    Some mistakes no matter how long ago they occurred need to be part of your employment screening. See the Roman Catholic Church for how to ignore past transgressions and stick your head in the sand.


  26. - wordslinger - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 2:30 pm:

    Leave, you’re kind of whacky there.

    I don’t think you’re going to find a prosecutor in the world who reduced child porn charges to something less “onerous.”

    And I don’t know where you’re going with the Catholic Church example.


  27. - MrJM - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 2:38 pm:

    “folks can expunge non-convictions pretty easily.”

    False.

    in 2013, three percent of the juvenile arrests in Cook County that didn’t lead to formal criminal charges were expunged.

    Do you think the other 97% of juveniles who were arrested but never charged didn’t get their records expunged because it’s “pretty easy”?

    – MrJM


  28. - fed up - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 2:51 pm:

    Do you think the other 97% of juveniles who were arrested but never charged didn’t get their records expunged because it’s “pretty easy”?

    MrJM. I think they didnt do it because they are ignorant of doing it, or lazy.


  29. - MrJM - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 2:55 pm:

    All 19,000 of them just not smart and hard working like you, huh?

    Yep. That must be it.

    – MrJM


  30. - wordslinger - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 2:55 pm:

    Fed Up, it costs money, too. But if ignorant and lazy works for you….


  31. - fed up - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 3:04 pm:

    Ignorant doesnt mean not smart MJM. But i’m guessing you didn’t know that which would make you Ignorant.

    Wordslinger, the Fees can be waived if you are unable to pay, damn that Google is handy.

    So yes, I stand by Lazy and ignorant statement.


  32. - crazybleedingheart - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 3:13 pm:

    Lazy and ignorant? How “lazy and ignorant” is it for government to keep, store, maintain and distribute records, year after year in perpetuity, on citizens it has never bothered to prove guilty of anything at all?


  33. - Rich Miller - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 3:20 pm:

    OK, calm down. Stop insulting everybody.


  34. - Yellow Dog Democrat - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 3:50 pm:

    @fed up -

    I think “ignorant” is the wrong word. Most Americans I think would be a little dumbfounded upon learning that their government not only maintains records of youth doing nothing wrong, but distributes them.

    It’s not like the State’s Attorney sends everyone a notice “Hey, we’ve decided not to press changes, but if you don’t fill out the enclosed form to request your arrest record be expunged, it could haunt you for the rest of your life.”

    I recall while working on Illinois’ first expungement bill one legislator who was adamantly opposed to anything that would prohibit employers from doing background checks.

    My response:

    “Employers are already doing background checks, and employees are stealing five times more from them than shoplifters. Employees aren’t stealing because they are career criminals, they are stealing because they feel underpaid and mistreated and feel the company owes them, and because the company does not have simple procedures in place to prevent employee theft.”

    That measure passed with overwhelming bipartisan support thanks to some commonsense Republicans who did more than just talk about Christian values, but actually practiced them even when it was politically inconvenient.

    I think we can safely say that every Illinoisan who is eligible would want to have every criminal record they could automatically expunged.

    So, do we want to move forward with common sense legislation that does just that, or, do we want to keep making lots of unnecessary work for Cook County Clerk Dorothy Brown’s Office?

    Just my three cents.

    YDD


  35. - MrJM - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 4:20 pm:

    How to “pretty easily” get your arrest record expunged:

    1) You have to figure out how to get expunged. (I’ll give you that one: https://www.illinois.gov/osad/expungement/Pages/default.aspx)
    2) You have to gather all your info, with exact dates and times and locations of arrest info.
    3) You have to file a court petition. (A quick show of hands of everyone who successfully filed a court petition before they turned 21…)
    4) Fees aren’t automatically or routinely waived. ($64 filing fee per arrest + $60 expungement fee)
    5) You have to take time off work or school to go to court. (They’re only open during the week and that’ll be fun to explain to your employer!)
    6) And you don’t get a public defender or other attorney to help. (”The Office of the State Appellate Defender cannot represent you on a petition to expunge or seal your records.”)
    7) And if you get something wrong, you either have get a new court date (more time from work/school) or start all over (with new filing fees).
    8) And you have to do all of this even if you were never charged with a crime, much less convicted of one.

    Yeah, “lazy or ignorant” is the only explanation for failing to do something that can be done “pretty easily” like expungement.

    – MrJM


  36. - "friend of a friend" - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 4:38 pm:

    The truth is this…expungement is legal fiction. You can have no convictions, a pardon, identity theft, successfully completed court supervision which authorizes expungement and still be “outed” by the media, still be illegally required to disclose it, and punished if you don’t. If you are arrested and not convicted then legally you won, they lost. But they still win by being able to bring up the fact that you engaged in criminal conduct. Ok false arrest? You were arrested so you must have engaged in criminal conduct to be arrested, even if the charges are dropped in court. See, this gives CLOUT it’s power. The powers that be decide when to use it against someone and how far they can go. But don’t worry, we are a society that follows the rule of law right? Tell me about it…


  37. - Rod - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 4:43 pm:

    As far as I can tell almost all arrest records for individuals arrested in the City of Chicago before 1970 but never subsequently convicted of a crime have not been entered into any electronic data base. I know of two people that were concerned about this and they had a friend who was a US marshal look up their records and there was nothing.


  38. - Jake From Elwood - Friday, May 16, 14 @ 4:49 pm:

    MrJM-
    Compared to most legal proceedings, obtaining an expungement is incredibly streamlined. One document, a fee, usually one court date. It is a routine procedure. One would hope that parents or responsible adults would help a minor along.
    So pipe down on the outrage.


Sorry, comments for this post are now closed.


* GOP leaders respond to special election push
* This just in... Special session called for January 8
* *** UPDATED x1 - GOMB disputes numbers *** Today's number: 3,000
* Shake this up, please
* On "war zones" and "foreign invasion"
* Topinka memorial roundup
* Question of the day - Golden Horseshoe Awards
* SUBSCRIBERS ONLY - Today's edition of Capitol Fax (use all CAPS in password)
* Yesterday's blog posts

Support CapitolFax.com
Visit our advertisers...

...............

...............

...............

...............

...............


Search This Blog...

Search the 98th General Assembly By Bill Number
(example: HB0001)

Search the 98th General Assembly By Keyword

          
        * Chef Vikas Khanna and his Lumia love
        * Android 5.1 dates, Galaxy S6 Edge, Apple Touch ID Changes & more – Pocketnow Daily
        * Gameloft outs Brothers in Arms 3, now with more actions and bigger weapons
        * Yahoo Weather app on Android now with animated effects
        * Mobile Commerce Consolidation As Mozido Takes Majority Stake In CorFire
        * Photo Editing App 'Brushstroke' Named App of the Week, Available for Free
        * Xperia Z4 details emerge out of recent Sony Pictures hack

        * Samsung Galaxy S6 Turns Up At Zauba
        * Sony Reportedly Working On A Xperia Z4 Tablet Ultra
        * Samsung ChatOn To Be Shut Down
        * Apple Increases Russian App Store Prices
        * Android M Will Build Android Auto Into Cars
        * Walkstool Comfort
        * Sony Xperia Z4 Leaked (Photos)

        * White Sox sign George Kottaras to a minor league deal
        * Kottaras to join White Sox with Minor League deal
        * Loss of Draft picks viewed as good trade for White Sox
        * Windy City revival: Cubs, White Sox revamped for '15
        * ZiPS projections underscore White Sox's riskiest bets
        * AL Central looking like one powerhouse division
        * Samardzija, Lester are right fits in Windy City

        ...............


        Main Menu
        Home
        Illinois
        YouTube
        Pundit rankings
        Obama
        Subscriber Content
        Durbin
        Burris
        Blagojevich Trial
        Advertising
        Updated Posts
        Polls

        Archives
        December 2014
        November 2014
        October 2014
        September 2014
        August 2014
        July 2014
        June 2014
        May 2014
        April 2014
        March 2014
        February 2014
        January 2014
        December 2013
        November 2013
        October 2013
        September 2013
        August 2013
        July 2013
        June 2013
        May 2013
        April 2013
        March 2013
        February 2013
        January 2013
        December 2012
        November 2012
        October 2012
        September 2012
        August 2012
        July 2012
        June 2012
        May 2012
        April 2012
        March 2012
        February 2012
        January 2012
        December 2011
        November 2011
        October 2011
        September 2011
        August 2011
        July 2011
        June 2011
        May 2011
        April 2011
        March 2011
        February 2011
        January 2011
        December 2010
        November 2010
        October 2010
        September 2010
        August 2010
        July 2010
        June 2010
        May 2010
        April 2010
        March 2010
        February 2010
        January 2010
        December 2009
        November 2009
        October 2009
        September 2009
        August 2009
        July 2009
        June 2009
        May 2009
        April 2009
        March 2009
        February 2009
        January 2009
        December 2008
        November 2008
        October 2008
        September 2008
        August 2008
        July 2008
        June 2008
        May 2008
        April 2008
        March 2008
        February 2008
        January 2008
        December 2007
        November 2007
        October 2007
        September 2007
        August 2007
        July 2007
        June 2007
        May 2007
        April 2007
        March 2007
        February 2007
        January 2007
        December 2006
        November 2006
        October 2006
        September 2006
        August 2006
        July 2006
        June 2006
        May 2006
        April 2006
        March 2006
        February 2006
        January 2006
        December 2005
        April 2005
        March 2005
        February 2005
        January 2005
        December 2004
        November 2004
        October 2004

        Blog*Spot Archives
        November 2005
        October 2005
        September 2005
        August 2005
        July 2005
        June 2005
        May 2005

        Syndication

        RSS Feed 2.0
        Comments RSS 2.0
        WordPress

        Loading


        * Quinn Wants Special Election To Replace Topinka..
        * Quinn Sets Special Session..


        * China pledges to speed entry of US pharmaceuticals
        * Report: Illinois fails to monitor runaway kids
        * Gov. Quinn calls session for comptroller election
        * Chickenpox forces southern Illinois prison lockdown
        * Instructor at Illinois school for visually impaired arrested
        * Chicago announces plans to build 88-story skyscraper
        * GOP says Rauner should appoint next comptroller
        * Quincy mother gets 2 years for unlawful restraint
        * Contract to bring 75 jobs to Scott Air Force Base
        * Illinois jobless rate falls to 6.4 percent

        * Quinn calls legislature back to Springfield to approve special election to replace Topinka
        * Audit: DCFS loses track of runaways
        * Audit: Illinois fails to monitor runaway kids
        * Chicago couple convicted of stealing state grants
        * Topinka remembered as tough, honest leader at memorial service
        * Illinois employers reminded of income-tax rollback
        * Memorial service for Topinka begins in suburban Chicago
        * Police use vacant Jacksonville site to train for worst-case scenarios
        * State-grant fraud case in hands of federal jury
        * Gov.-elect Rauner says some agency directors may stay

        * Great moments in Chicago architecture 2014
        * McDonald's to sponsor 2015 SXSW festival
        * Chicago tourism arm opens fourth bureau in China
        * Dow soars more than 400 points
        * Mayor Emanuel will vacation in Chile


        * A whole lot of nothing from the City Council
        * Dozens gather at Logan Square eatery for ‘Serial’ podcast finale
        * Sony’s choice on ‘The Interview’ is one lost battle in a long war
        * Playing for dollars, smiles at O’Hare
        * Rewriting the Sony cyberattack script
        * Sony’s choice on ‘The Interview’ is one lost battle in a long war
        * Emanuel denies Willie Wilson petition challenge is racist ploy
        * Ex-FBI agent’s book tells mob tales in ‘A Gun in My Gucci'
        * Off Message: The Year in Review
        * Dem Rep. Bill Foster talking to big donors about U.S. Senate race


        * Metra train fatally hits pedestrian in Oak Forest
        * Chicago man shot to death in Montgomery
        * 3 people injured in separate shootings
        * Santa helps Catholic school complete fundraising mission
        * Rahm Emanuel defends record on ethics in first term
        * Restaurants that repeatedly failed health inspections in 2014: analysis
        * Second bottlenose dolphin born at Brookfield Zoo
        * 2 found dead in South Side home died in murder-suicide
        * Wisconsin girls in Slenderman case ruled competent to stand trial
        * North Chicago 21-year-old dies after hit and run in Waukegan


        * Parties' Power Grabs In Battle For Comptroller; Quinn Calls Legislators Into Special Session
        * Let's Talk Kids - "Your Phone-a-Friend List"
        * Vatican signals new tone on US nuns
        * StoryCorps: Bilingual pre-school teacher describes the state of education in Chicago
        * Chicago mayor's commission unveils plan for a safer Chicago
        * US announces protections for transgender workers
        * Cook County to join cameras-in-court program
        * IIAA Teaches Life Skills Through Sports
        * Illinois Republican: Cuba Agreement "Good First Step"
        * Unions sue to stop Chicago pension overhaul


        * E.J. Dionne: Chuck Schumer: Take two
        * Esther Cepeda: The rainbow that isn’t
        * Raoul, Righter, Nekritz, Sandack: Clarifying privacy, eavesdropping bill
        * Quote of the day: Friday, Dec. 19, 2014
        * Quinn calls legislature back to Springfield to approve special election to replace Topinka
        * Audit: DCFS loses track of runaways
        * Audit: Illinois fails to monitor runaway kids
        * Bernard Schoenburg: Schmidt considers challenging Sgro for park board president
        * Brian Sauder: Faithful decisions for the holidays
        * Eugene Robinson: The price of being hacked


        * Man feels shortchanged over postal regs
        * Police Beat
        * ‘Todos somos Americanos’
        * ISVI instructor facing sex abuse charge
        * Cuba relations seen as opening doors
        * Apartment fire
        * Winter wonderland
        * Enjoy season, but remember safety on road
        * Showing weakness is a bad move
        * McAllister recieves FFA award


        * American Hockey League
        * Jags' Marks caps 21-13 win over Titans with sack
        * AP Top Sports News At 4 a.m. EST
        * 6th man set to plead guilty in MLB steroid case
        * Parity abounds among women's hoops elite

        * Bost Readies to Join Congress
        * 'Amateur Radio Parity Act' Campaign Will R...
        * Can Congress End Cuba Embargo? Many Republ...
        * Illinois Rep. Mike Bost flips his lid over...
        * Rep. Mike Bost
        * ARRL Letter
        * Lawmakers on Cuba deal’s impact
        * Kilquest and Bryant to Face Off for 115th ...
        * Controversy and change mark 2014 in Highla...
        * Ex-Gov. Ryan says new markets will open in...

        * Durbin on Cuba Relations...

        * GOP senator wants 'The Interview' shown at......
        * Sen. Kirk suggests raising money with scre......

        * City Clerk Debuts Online Residential Permit Parking Map
        * Expert Writing Service for Students’ Deductive Writing
        * Will Jan. 8 mean anything?
        * Remember "Night After Night"
        * Santa's Taking The L Through Uptown
        * Party With The Pups At Driftwood
        * Santa's Taking The L Through Uptown (Updated)
        * Kinzinger bullish on America and Illinois
        * Illinois U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk Promises to Screen 'The Interview' at Fundraisers
        * Quinn calls for special session to push special 2016 comptroller election


        * Governor Quinn Calls Legislative Special Session - Governor Urges Legislature to Set Up 2016 Special Election for Comptroller
        * Governor Quinn Announces Illinois’ Unemployment Rate Hits New Low - Illinois’ Economic Comeback Continues; Unemployment Rate Falls to Lowest Level in More than Six Years
        * Illinois Ranks #1 in Volunteer Rate Among the Country’s 8 Largest States - 2.57 Million Illinoisans Give $7.2 Billion in Service
        * Law Enforcement, IDOT Make Final Push to Save Lives in 2014, Roadside Safety Checks Planned Over Holidays - New Episode of “The Driving Dead” Premieres Friday as Holiday Travelers are Reminded to Drive Sober and Buckle Up
        * Department of Insurance Announces Two Convictions Resulting from its Workers’ Compensation Fraud Investigations - Former Crystal Lake Police Officer and Former Business Owner Convicted




            Hosted by MCS SUBSCRIBE to Capitol Fax Advertise Here Mobile Version Contact Rich Miller