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Governor’s office claims it’s pledged no lockout, dropped pension demand

Wednesday, Jul 29, 2015

…Adding… AFSCME has responded. Click here.

* From a letter sent today to all state agency directors from Jason Barclay, who is the governor’s general counsel

As you are aware, agreements between the Executive Branch and labor unions representing state employees expired on June 30, 2015. We initially agreed to a tolling agreement that extended negotiations on new collective bargaining agreements until July 31, 2015. Today, we signed an additional extension until September 30, 2015 or whenever the parties reach an impasse in negotiations. This positive development gives us additional time to reach agreement without the threat of a strike during the negotiations.

Contrary to incendiary comments in AFSCME’s newsletters that have been reported publicly, with or without a tolling agreement the Governor will not lock out state employees. We have told AFSCME that, but they have refused to inform their members.

While unions are prohibited from striking under the terms of the latest tolling agreement, you should nonetheless continue all contingency planning activities for the possibility of a strike. AFSCME has refused to move off the proposals I reported in my last update. Those proposals are outrageously expensive and unacceptable to the Governor. They include the following:

    • An 11.5% pay increase at a cost of over $1.25 billion over 4 years;
    • A 29% pay increase for some employees who receive a general and a “step” increase over 4 years;
    • A 25% increase in longevity pay for Step 8 employees;
    • A 37.5 hour work week;
    • 5 weeks of fully paid vacation;
    • Full health insurance benefits to laid off employees for up to 2 years;
    • Full health insurance benefits to intermittent employees;
    • Full health insurance benefits to part-time employees;
    • A new more expensive health insurance package that covers new procedures such as oral surgery (which is currently covered by the dental plan) and orthodontics for those over 18, without any additional employee contributions;
    • Allow laid off employees to move to a lower employee position but keep their same wage rates indefinitely;
    • Pay lawyers in the union time and half for any time over 37.5 hours per week and pay for them to attend legal conferences;
    • Impose a penalty by doubling wage increases anytime agreed increases are delayed because of budget constraints; and
    • Increase overtime pay at DOC to double time after 6 overtime sessions every 3 months.

Our financial analysts estimate that these proposals would add $1.6 billion in salary and pension costs and would eliminate $500 million per year in healthcare savings that were part of the overall healthcare savings included in both Democrat and Republican budgets. At a time when the current budget is more than $4 billion out of balance, this is unacceptable. It is also far out of line with what other unions have proposed, and which we recently agreed with the Teamsters, who represent over 3,000 state employees across state government, including the Master Sergeants in the State Police. […]

If AFSCME is reasonable, we are hopeful for an outcome similar to the Teamsters. Thus far, they have been unwilling to offer any revisions to their costly economic proposals.

We, however, (also contrary to AFSCME’s newsletters) have made significant concessions from the initial proposal we made months ago. Those include:

    Dropping our request that employees voluntarily move into the Tier II pension system;
    • Withdrawing our proposal to unilaterally implement new work rules;
    • Substantially modifying our proposal regarding the integrity of the bargaining unit – instead of deleting that entire section of the contract, we have proposed returning to collective bargaining language from 2004 that prohibits management from taking any action directed at eroding bargaining unit work;
    • Modifying our proposals regarding management rights, returning to AFSCME’s current language with the caveat that our exercise of management rights will be tempered by the express provisions of the collective bargaining agreement;
    • Turning to the managed-competition model for subcontracting endorsed by AFSCME international;
    • Dropping our proposal to eliminate all “bumping” rights for employees affected by a layoff, presenting a hybrid that allows for senior employees to transfer into vacancies and maintain some “bumping” rights;
    • Withdrawing our proposal to change the rate at which current employees earned vacation;
    • Maintaining the current number of holidays at 12 and a half days a year;
    • Resolving a significant debate with AFSCME regarding the appropriate definition of a grievance and the grievance procedure;
    • Creating a new joint committee on working conditions, safety, and health;
    • Resolving changes to the procedure for temporary assignments and detailing; and
    • Agreeing to a thorough listing of which bargaining unit employees are “working supervisors” and therefore subject to discipline for not enforcing the collective bargaining agreement on behalf of management.

Some emphasis was in the original. The full letter is here.

- Posted by Rich Miller        

83 Comments
  1. - Formerly Known As... - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 2:59 pm:

    Well, who is ==extreme== now?


  2. - walker - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:03 pm:

    Good and good.

    The pension thing would have been found illegal anyway, but still a good move.


  3. - Demoralized - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:03 pm:

    I suspect if the Governor dropped his demands for a change to health insurance an agreement could be reached fairly quickly.


  4. - sparky791 - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:04 pm:

    How is pension thing a concession when it was unconstitutional anyway?


  5. - Norseman - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:04 pm:

    A lot of terrible things mentioned by Indy are currently in place, i.e. work week and vacation for example.


  6. - Anon2U - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:05 pm:

    AFSCME appears to be negotiating in the extreme. A radical position if you will. Why is acting with moderation here? Rauner.
    I’m not sure it’s a good idea for AFSCME to have their position out for all the public to see. U.S. Poor saps in the private sector now see how extremely radical their position is!


  7. - Oswego Willy - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:06 pm:

    Hmm.

    From the letter above;

    “While unions are prohibited from striking under the terms of the latest tolling agreement, you should nonetheless continue all contingency planning activities for the possibility of a strike.”

    Got me “a thinking”

    If AFSCME is prohibited from striking, and that prohibition must be followed, then why would agencies be in danger of a strike? Why would it be necessary to prepare for a strike?

    Hmm.


  8. - @MisterJayEm - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:07 pm:

    “Governor will not lock out state employees.”

    This is the kind of statement that could be taken at face value if offered by someone trustworthy.

    – MrJM


  9. - up2now - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:07 pm:

    Health insurance?


  10. - Demoralized - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:10 pm:

    ==AFSCME appears to be negotiating in the extreme.==

    They submitted an extreme proposal to counter the state’s original extreme proposal. I don’t know why they haven’t yet supplied a revised proposal. They ought to try to put out a revised proposal that is at least close to what the Teamsters agreement was and see what the Governor does.


  11. - burbanite - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:10 pm:

    What state lawyers are in AFSCME?


  12. - @MisterJayEm - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:10 pm:

    AFSCME appears to be negotiating in the extreme. A radical position if you will. Why is acting with moderation here? Rauner.
    I’m not sure it’s a good idea for AFSCME to have their position out for all the public to see. U.S. Poor saps in the private sector now see how extremely radical their position is!

    The Raunerbot Edition of Madlibs makes a great gift!

    – MrJM


  13. - Abe the Babe - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:10 pm:

    Is it really a “compromise” when you take an unrealistic demand off the table?

    “I promise judge, I compromised with them and they wouldn’t budge. I mean I even dropped my demand that they move to Indiana and become indentured servants”


  14. - Formerly Known As... - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:11 pm:

    ==A 37.5 hour work week==

    That, and some of the other points made, will go over well with voters working 40 hours a week. /s


  15. - Demoralized - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:11 pm:

    ==What state lawyers are in AFSCME?==

    There are lots of attorneys in the bargaining unit.


  16. - Tired - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:11 pm:

    So AFSCME is asking for a golden palace, and Rauner is asking the union to stop existing. At least everyone agrees that when/if workers stop working, it’ll be the other guys fault.


  17. - Greyhound - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:12 pm:

    5 weeks of vacation is a current benefit for employees after like 17 years. Not new and not for everyone. I believe we all still start at 2 weeks.

    Taking the request to voluntarily go to tier 2 off the table means nothing. It was ridiculous and was never going to happen.


  18. - Mason born - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:12 pm:

    Demoralized nails it. It appears that the healthcare is the likely hangup. Since both r and d’s have it in the budget I suspect this was aimed at the general assembly. Something along the lines of we (gov and ga) both need ASCME to accept lower healthcare. Now don’t overide my veto.


  19. - Demoralized - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:13 pm:

    FKA:

    The work week is already 37.5 hours. So that proposal was to maintain the status quo. True, the public probably doesn’t like it. But it isn’t something new that they are asking for.


  20. - Skeptic - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:13 pm:

    “5 weeks of vacation” for everybody? I rather doubt that. Nice job of lying with the truth though.


  21. - CB - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:13 pm:

    ” Why would it be necessary to prepare for a strike?”

    Because the Tooling Agreement expires 9/30 then they can strike


  22. - CB - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:15 pm:

    I meant “Tolling” not “Tooling”


  23. - Formerly Known As... - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:15 pm:

    @Demoralized - well said. Difficult for Rauner to blast them if it is similar to what he has already agreed to.

    Like Madigan with the pay increase, their mistake is helping Rauner. Assuming it is a mistake and not just incompetence or what they really want.


  24. - Omega Man - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:15 pm:

    “It’s a madhouse I tell you, a madhouse!”


  25. - john doe - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:17 pm:

    =A 37.5 hour work week, 5 weeks of fully paid vacation,Full health insurance benefits to part-time & intermittent employees=
    Only in public sector employment!


  26. - Oswego Willy - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:18 pm:

    I’m mocking the idea that “we’re good, we won’t lock anyone out, our word is good. The bad Union, they are prohibited, but don’t trust them…”

    It’s one thing to prepare, it’s another in a letter to insinuate you don’t trust your partner in negotiating.

    That goes for both sides…


  27. - Buddy - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:19 pm:

    12 holidays. Are we still forcing non-Christens to take a day off work in late December?


  28. - Skeptic - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:19 pm:

    John Doe: Nope, not only in Public Sector. I’ve worked in the private sector at both Fortune 500 and mid-sized companies. Both had 37.5 hour weeks. And the 5 weeks of vacation? Like I said, that’s only after you’ve been there a while. You know, just like it is in the private sector.


  29. - Anonymous - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:20 pm:

    ==The work week is already 37.5 hours. So that proposal was to maintain the status quo.==

    And it’s a bad status quo. Just because something has always been done one way, doesn’t mean it’s a good idea to keep doing it that same way.


  30. - Formerly Known As... - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:21 pm:

    @Demoralized - that is correct about the work week. It is just asking to keep things the way there already are.

    My point, poorly made, was that many people outside of government and political-types do not already know these details. If someone like Rauner spends a few million spreading the points in this letter, it is likely to weaken support for the union negotiating position and make him look like the ==reasonable== one, at least to most who operate under very different working conditions such as a 40 hour work week.


  31. - Demoralized - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:23 pm:

    ==And it’s a bad status quo==

    My point was that they were not asking for anything new. I don’t find that particular proposal to be “extreme.” As I said, I think there could be agreement fairly quickly if they dropped their demands to change the structure of the healthcare program.


  32. - Demoralized - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:25 pm:

    FKA:

    I don’t think the Administration’s issue is with the 37.5 hour work week. I think their issue is with overtime being paid out after you work 37.5 hours rather than 40 hours. I suspect AFSCME would kick and scream at that change but I doubt they would scuttle an agreement over it. I could be wrong.


  33. - Anonymous - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:25 pm:

    ==And the 5 weeks of vacation…==

    They also receive comp time, ie extra time off, from day 1, for work done over 37.5 hours. How much of that would be absorbed by making it 40 hr? I’d guess a good chunk.


  34. - RD55 - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:30 pm:

    37.5 hrs work week due to 2 unpaid 15 minute breaks per day. 5 weeks (20 days vacation) after 26+ years of work.


  35. - Anon2U - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:30 pm:

    I really enjoy the false argument of “we’ve always done it this way. Nothing new here so what’s the big deal?” The deal is the old way isn’t working out too well for the 85% of the state that’s not in a Union. Unions might want to rethink the reality of OT after 37.5 hours and increased vacation time.


  36. - Skeptic - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:31 pm:

    “increased vacation time.” What increased vacation time? It’s the same for everybody.


  37. - How Ironic - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:31 pm:

    @- john doe - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:17 pm:
    “A 37.5 hour work week”
    Only in public sector employment!

    No, it’s the same in the private sector. Hourly employees are entitled to 2 15 minute breaks per 8 hour shift. That’s 2.5 hours. 40 hour (work week) minus 2.5 = 37.5 hours.

    See…math isn’t that hard.


  38. - Greyhound - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:32 pm:

    Is it really bargaining in the extreme if your starting position is to keep what you already have?


  39. - RD55 - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:33 pm:

    Also, comp time is received in place of being paid for OT.


  40. - Centennial - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:34 pm:

    I know quite a few state lawyers in AFCME. Not GC or DGC of course, usually senior counsels, etc. There were quite a few at DOR if I remember correctly.


  41. - Rusty618 - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:34 pm:

    ==AFSCME appears to be negotiating in the extreme.==

    Remember this is coming from Rauner. Let’s wait for AFSCME’s response to see if this actual facts.

    ==And the 5 weeks of vacation…==

    That comes after 25 years of service, not from day 1.


  42. - kozmik - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:35 pm:

    In DOC it’s currently a 37.5 hour work week because you aren’t paid for lunch breaks. You only accrue 25 days of vacation after 25 years, and most people retire within 5 years of accruing 25 vacation days per year. Common ground is good, but lots of misdirection in the press release.


  43. - Anonymous - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:36 pm:

    ==
    Is it really bargaining in the extreme if your starting position is to keep what you already have?==

    If what you already have is existing in the extreme and is unsustainable, then yes.


  44. - GraduatedCollegeStudent - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:37 pm:

    ===And it’s a bad status quo. Just because something has always been done one way, doesn’t mean it’s a good idea to keep doing it that same way. ===

    On the flip side if you’re only paid for that much time…

    That said, yeah, OT shouldn’t start until 40 hours probably, assuming the state then starts properly staffing things.


  45. - Norseman - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:37 pm:

    === If what you already have is existing in the extreme and is unsustainable, then yes. ===

    Do you even bother thinking when posting your silly comment. Unsustainable, LOL.


  46. - Slick Willy - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:38 pm:

    25 vacation days = 26 years of service.


  47. - GraduatedCollegeStudent - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:40 pm:

    ===I really enjoy the false argument of “we’ve always done it this way. Nothing new here so what’s the big deal?” The deal is the old way isn’t working out too well for the 85% of the state that’s not in a Union. Unions might want to rethink the reality of OT after 37.5 hours and increased vacation time. ===

    Or the rest of the state might want to reconsider not being in a union.

    Or again, if OT is the hobby horse, we could always expand the state’s workforce so that OT isn’t a necessity.


  48. - CrazyHorse - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:42 pm:

    Let’s call this what it is. A trojan horse before a vote to override his veto.


  49. - Formerly Known As... - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:43 pm:

    @Demoralized - I suspect you are correct, but question what will be ==enough== to satisfy Rauner in negotiations. If he goes too far, he could easily scuttle a deal as well.


  50. - Slick Willy - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:47 pm:

    Anon2U - “Unions might want to rethink the reality of OT after 37.5 hours and increased vacation time.”

    It is my understanding that AFSCME is not asking for more vacation time. Please explain what you mean by that statement.


  51. - ash - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:51 pm:

    but still insisting on a 500% healthcare increase?


  52. - Disappointed - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:54 pm:

    I’m so relieved to see that the union was being so “reasonable”.


  53. - Joe M - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:56 pm:

    It was reported in the SJR a while back that the Governor was pushing for a 60/40 health insurance plan, where the employees paid 40% of medical bills. The Governor didn’t mention dropping his demand for those lower health insurance benefits. So I assume that is what he is still demanding. And it was reported that he also wanted employees to pay more towards the premiums, even though they are already paying at or above the 17-18% what the Kaiser Foundation says are national norms for percentage of premiums employees pay. Less coverage at higher premiums. That could remain a major stumbling point in negotiations.


  54. - Former Merit Comp Slave - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 3:59 pm:

    In all fairness, there seems to be some exaggeration from both sides. AFSCME is always kind of breathless in their updates, granted, but many of the items the admin lists above are take-aways, not negotiating


  55. - Triple fat - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:03 pm:

    I for one would be willing to work 40 hours a week if the Governor would drop his foolish position that I will not receive step increases and a 2 percent COLA for the life of the Agreement, reinstate my semi-automatic promotion and pay me my hourly rate for the 2 1/2 hours of work per week that we gave up originally when a 37 1/2 work week was originally agreed to. Also you can take as many holidays you want to take away from me but it’ll cost you. Since when is being a strong negotiator operating in the extreme? If you are negotiating within set parameters. It’s when you expand the perameters- such as give me an unrelated union busting law before I agree to funding government. It’s like if the Speaker would require the abolishment of no fault workman’s comp and require Work Comp to go thru the courts… But you see Speaker Madigan isn’t proposing such an extreme agenda.


  56. - Slick Willy - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:07 pm:

    A 25% increase in longevity pay for Step 8 employees. What is the current amount for longevity pay? $25 a month?


  57. - Skeptic - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:08 pm:

    “pay for them to attend legal conferences;” So the SuperStars(tm) aren’t paid when they go to conferences?


  58. - Whenwillitend - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:09 pm:

    Health insurance still going up over 500%……..take that off the table and hopefully the union would agree with the contract.


  59. - Factory Worker - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:11 pm:

    The Governor’s General Counsel’s letter was released for PR to influence the GA. This out of context and incorrect assessment of the negotiations is pretty ridiculous. Since the Governor initially proposed stripping state
    employees of nearly everything, it is laughable that he now tries to portray the union’s initial position as extreme. If any elected official actually believes what they read from the Governor’s office, then remedial education would actually be too high a bar for them.


  60. - Skeptic - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:12 pm:

    Just a thought…another bone Rauner can throw to the union that actually save money: Drop his Fair-Share lawsuit.


  61. - St.Ambrose - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:15 pm:

    AFSCME (leadership) is a ship absent a rudder and it’s appropriate that negotiators be evaluated for PTSD.


  62. - anonlurker - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:17 pm:

    Healthcare is a significant issue that’s not addressed in the letter as pointed out by previous posters. That’s the deal breaker.


  63. - Anon - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:19 pm:

    – St.Ambrose –

    I believe the reference to PTSD was unwarranted.


  64. - A guy - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:22 pm:

    If you’re going to Veto a bill, this is how you do it.
    Anyone of reasonable intelligence can understand the reasoning put forth.
    It’s time to bargain seriously and in good faith. That goes for everyone.


  65. - Skeptic - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:29 pm:

    “eliminate $500 million per year in healthcare savings” Or put another way “transfer $500 million of costs onto the 30,000 employees in AFSCME.” That works out to about $16,000 per employee.


  66. - D.P.Gumby - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:30 pm:

    Mistake No. 1…believing anything said by anyone associated w/ Brucie. Even if they said the sun will rise, don’t invest in sunblock!


  67. - Demoralized - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:31 pm:

    ==I really enjoy the false argument of “we’ve always done it this way. Nothing new here so what’s the big deal?”==

    When you are talking about maintaining the status quo on work hours and vacation (they aren’t asking for increased vacation, they are asking for the status quo) then, yeah, it’s not a big deal. There is no increased economic impact to either of those proposals.

    ==The deal is the old way isn’t working out too well for the 85% of the state that’s not in a Union. ==

    Done playing the victim yet?

    ==If what you already have is existing in the extreme and is unsustainable, then yes.==

    Want to be a bit more specific with that drive by?


  68. - @MisterJayEm - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:44 pm:

    “Buh buh but 37.5 hours and 5 weeks vacation!!1!” must have felt like a much better argument before people who knew what they were talking about started commenting.

    ‘Cause it looks absolutely clueless now.

    – MrJM


  69. - The Dude Abides - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:46 pm:

    Since the Rauner administration has made demands that are outrageously harsh, it’s only natural that the Union would make requests that they know won’t be met, it’s called bargaining. The letter from the Governor is dishonest and dropping the Tier 2 pension request which was blatantly unconstitutional anyway so that’s no concession. I hope the SB1229 veto can be overridden but I don’t know if they have the votes though I know they are close. Rauner knew from day one that he was going to veto the bill but he sat on it from June 4 to July 29 because he wants to drag this thing out as long as he can. I laughed at the letter because I know that the administration is not being reasonable in their negociations and that the letter was disingenuous.


  70. - CrazyHorse - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:47 pm:

    ==If you’re going to Veto a bill, this is how you do it.
    Anyone of reasonable intelligence can understand the reasoning put forth.
    It’s time to bargain seriously and in good faith. That goes for everyone.==

    Perhaps if the reasoning wasn’t full of half-truths I would agree. Rauner releases a press release indicating he has just dropped some of his ridiculous demands after months of negotiations, including unconstitutionally forcing all employees into Tier 2 in one day and he considers it a good faith negotiation? LOL.

    Honey, It’s true I’ve been cheating on you for the last six months and I know I was just with her last night, but believe me, I’m as faithful of a man as you’ll find on this earth. Who wouldn’t trust this guy?


  71. - Norseman - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:47 pm:

    Well said MrJM. Of course, we know that accurately discussing issues is not a strong suit with this administration.


  72. - sal-says - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:49 pm:

    == • Dropping our request that employees voluntarily move into the Tier II pension system; ==

    Understand it’s a stretch to hop/expect that Raunner & Gang can comprehend, but It.Is.Illegal. C’mon, man.


  73. - Sir Reel - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 4:52 pm:

    Most State employees work 8:30 to 5 with a 1 hour lunch break. That’s 7.5 hours of work. The 2 15 minute breaks are within those 7.5 hours and are paid. So State employees work 7 hours a day.

    Also, while many State employees work OT as directed by management, for example those in Corrections, many more or less control their OT by scheduling meetings late in the day or in locations requiring travel. And yes management must approve this OT but has what incentive to?

    AFSCME always trots out the underpaid prison guard forced to work OT or the child care worker with lots of challenging cases. Yes there’s plenty of these, but also many State employees who make lots more and set their own work schedules.


  74. - Mason born - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 5:06 pm:

    Sir Reel

    What are you smoking? Most ot in DOC is earned by officers or guards if you prefer. They don’t schedule meetings. OT gets scheduled when judge A states that he wants inmate b in front if him in his courthouse at 8:00 a.m. if the convict is in sangamon county and the judge is in cook do the math. Crimintly at least pretend to know what you are talling about.


  75. - Facts are Stubborn Things - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 5:10 pm:

    If the administration is hoping for an agreement similar to the teamsters, then it comes down to trading pay increased for keeping health care as is. Retirees will get the health care that is negotiated and so it is a bit of a divide and conquer strategy. Retirees are most interested now in health care and some employees may be more interested in pay raises. Could it end up being a mix with some small pay increase and some small changes increase to the cost of health care?


  76. - Anonymous - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 5:28 pm:

    “Retirees are most interested now in health care and some employees may be more interested in pay raises.”

    no employee wants to pay another $5,000 or more in health insurance premiums for a bronze plan in return for a 2% increase in pay. It would be a diminishment for retirees and they have already won that battle at ILSC.


  77. - Cold - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 5:34 pm:

    All those who are whining that public sector employees receive some benefit purportedly not granted by large employers in the private sector should calculate how much more it would cost if public sector salaries had parity with the private sector. How about those professional employees with advanced degrees who were found in a study to be paid 40% less than the private sector? Giving an extra vacation day or holiday doesn’t come close to filling the gap.


  78. - Rufus - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 6:44 pm:

    This has been an interesting discussion, however, IMHO, the real issue (or question) is:

    Will the GA override the veto? Since it is not about raising taxes, it may have a good chance.

    Would like to hear (actually read) others’ thoughts!


  79. - thoughts matter - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 6:52 pm:

    Here’s the vacation time schedule -

    you come in earning 10 days a year at a rate of 1 day 8 months of a year, and 1/2 da 4 months of a year. Repeat for the next 4 years. So after your first six months on the job, you’ve earned 5 days of vacation. After 5 years, that earning schedule is adjusted so that you earn 15 days of vacation. At ten years, it becomes 17 days a year, at 15 years, it’s 20 days. 25 years = 25 days. No different than large private sector employees. Ask State Farm, Horace Mann, ADM, etc. Rauner wanted 10 days max a year for the first 14 years,, and 15 days max a year after that,

    As to 37.5 hours a week… most insurance companies also go with 37.5 hours a week, and breaks are included by state law. So no different. Also, lots of insurance companies allow work from home a couple days a week - again, ask State Farm.

    You have to compare apples to apples. You can’t compare the State employee work force Walmart, McDonalds, or your local gas station. Lots of state employees have bachelors or masters degrees, and didn’t take a vow of poverty to take this job.


  80. - sad - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 7:08 pm:

    Again we get paid bimonthly as well. Which means we work a week extra each year same pay.


  81. - just a worker - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 7:31 pm:

    As for step increases, Highway Maintainers start at 75% of top pay, 5% increase per year to finally achieve 100% pay at 5 years. The Teamsters in Chicago agreed to freeze those steps, not all Teamsters. That is akin to 6 tier pay scale being put in place. No assurance that frozen in step, 75/80/85/90/95 would ever get put in proper step when this supposed contract ends. So by agreeing to the freeze is a 6 tier wage scale created for possibly ever. NO THANKS!!!


  82. - tired of politics - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 8:00 pm:

    Sir Reel,
    Can you provide any AFSCME represented employee who gets an hour paid lunch?


  83. - SamHall - Wednesday, Jul 29, 15 @ 11:27 pm:

    Health insurance for part time employees? Let’s start with the General Assembly.


Sorry, comments for this post are now closed.


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