Capitol Fax.com - Your Illinois News Radar » 2019 » July
SUBSCRIBE to Capitol Fax      Advertise Here      Mobile Version     Exclusive Subscriber Content     Updated Posts    Contact
CapitolFax.com
To subscribe to Capitol Fax, click here.
Illinois in a must-win rematch vs. Missouri

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* Last year about this time

Beer, hot dogs and sunshine made for a perfect afternoon at the ballpark, but those visiting Busch Stadium on Thursday weren’t there to see the St. Louis Cardinals.

Instead, they watched Missouri lawmakers defeat their legislative counterparts from Illinois, 7-4, in what officials from both sides hope will become an annual softball game. The winning team takes home both a shiny gold trophy and bragging rights to its respective state Capitol. […]

Still, Missouri pulled off the win, thanks to a strong showing in the first few innings that put them up 7-0 by the bottom of the fourth. The Illinois Legislature answered in the fifth inning with two runs to prevent a shutout, and eventually scored two more to tighten the score, but they couldn’t overcome the deficit.

After the game, the lawmakers joked that Missouri’s term limits may have given the Show-Me state the advantage of a younger team.

“We have more seasoned ballplayers,” joked Illinois Rep. Jay Hoffman, D-Belleville.

It was hotter than blazes, and the Missouri team… Um, how can I put this politely?… Ignored some ground rules.

And, yes, term limits probably played a role. The average age of the MO squad was like 25. I’m not joking. OK, well, maybe a little. Their House Speaker was only 36 years old at the time. Dude looked like a kid and he may have been the oldest member of the team.

Not to mention that the teams were playing 12-inch softball, not the Chicago-area’s 16-inch, which is what they play during the annual House vs. Senate game. And they used the entire professional field, meaning 90-foot base-paths. One of our players (I won’t say who) hit a triple and I thought he was gonna die by the time he got to third base. He was huffing and puffing and covered in sweat and looked at me with such desperation that I tossed him a water bottle.

I didn’t realize how bitter I still was about that game until they asked me to come back again for the rematch. I “announced” the Illinois half-innings on the stadium’s PA system last July and I’ll be doing it again tonight.

* Illinois team captain Rep. Jay Hoffman recently talked about his team’s prospects with the BND


Come to think of it, maybe the players should ignore the headline on this post. Let’s just hope nobody gets hurt.

- Posted by Rich Miller   13 Comments      


Pritzker names new Gaming Board chair and another member

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* Press release…

Charles Schmadeke will serve on and chair the Illinois Gaming Board.* Schmadeke is a partner-in-charge of Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP’s Springfield office. He has more than 25 years of litigation, mediation and administrative law experience and concentrates his practice representing business and governmental clients in litigation and mediation, including cases involving employment issues, civil rights defense, regulatory matters, and contract and tort claims. He has represented and counseled governmental clients on a wide variety of matters, including governance, organization and fiscal issues, civil rights, regulation enforcement and employment. Before joining Hinshaw & Culbertson in 2003, Schmadeke served in senior positions in Illinois state government. He was the General Counsel to the Illinois State Comptroller, where he advised the Comptroller on constitutional and statutory matters and fiscal affairs, and also conducted cases before the civil service board and handled litigation with cemeteries, funeral homes and other entities regulated by the Comptroller. He also worked 11 years for the Illinois Attorney General as Chief of the General Law Bureau, which represents all state agencies, state officers and state employees in federal and state litigation. In addition to supervising a staff of 21 attorneys and overseeing an active caseload of thousands of cases before federal and state courts and administrative tribunals, Schmadeke personally handled many cases including matters involving civil rights, professional regulation and employment issues.

Anthony Garcia will serve on the Illinois Gaming Board.* Since August 2013, Garcia has served as senior counsel for litigation and investigations at The Boeing Company where he manages litigation as well as supervises and conducts internal investigations implicating violations of the False Claims Act, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, Anti-Kickback Statute and other statutes. Garcia previously served as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in the Northern District of Illinois where he investigated and prosecuted violations of narcotics and weapons statutes, murder for hire, and fraud and export control statutes. Previously, Garcia spent seven years at the U.S. Department of Justice, five years as a trial attorney for the Office of International Affairs and Counterespionage Section and two years as an attaché in Mexico City, working closely with senior U.S. and Mexican officials to combat transnational crime. He also served as an Assistant State’s Attorney in the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office and as an Intelligence Analyst at the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. Garcia received his Juris Doctor and Bachelor of Arts in international studies from the University of Wyoming.

He’s been under pressure for weeks to get this done.

- Posted by Rich Miller   13 Comments      


Question of the day

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* Eastern Bloc and assorted allies. Caption?…

At least it’s an Illinois flag.

- Posted by Rich Miller   97 Comments      


Lipinski was at Gilroy Garlic Festival during shooting

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* Email…

Good afternoon,

Congressman Lipinski is in northern California on vacation and was at the Gilroy Garlic Festival last night when the shots were fired. Both he and his wife Judy are ok. Attached is a statement from him. For now, Congressman Lipinski has asked that you respect his and Judy’s privacy during this difficult time.

Thank you,
Phil

Phil Davidson
Communications Director
U.S. Rep. Dan Lipinski

* Statement…

My wife Judy and I were at the Gilroy Garlic Festival during the shooting. The shooter was not far from us as we heard the loud “pops,” which seemed to get closer as we ran. We are very thankful to law enforcement. The tragedy would have been far worse if not for their quick action. Also, the festival staff did a great job in the aftermath.

Judy and I are okay. Thank God. We pray for those killed and injured, and for their families.

The level of gun violence in our nation is sickening. It is an issue we must deal with not only legislatively, but spiritually and socially.

* Meanwhile

Mayor Lori Lightfoot on Monday promised a “robust security plan” to protect patrons at this weekend’s Lollpalooza music festival after a random shooting at a California food festival killed three people, including a 6-year-old boy.

“Every time something happens nationally — you’ll recall that there was a report a year ago that the Las Vegas shooter had secured a hotel room here — so, we are taking all of these things into consideration,” the mayor said.

Lighftoot said she plans to participate in a “table-top-exercise” on Tuesday, two days before music lovers are expected to descend on Grant Park, to test the “robust security plan” put together by the Chicago Police Department and organizers of Lollapalooza.

“We are vigorously, aggressively reaching out, planning and drawing upon resources form our federal partners to make sure that there’s no incident here in Chicago,” the mayor said.

“Now, somebody who’s determined obviously poses a challenge. But it’s not gonna be for lack of preparation on our part.”

* Background

Authorities in California on Monday identified Santino William Legan, 19, as the gunman whose rampage at the Gilroy Garlic Festival left three people dead and at least a dozen injured.

Gilroy Police Chief Scot Smithee confirmed the identity of the shooter, saying he entered the festival Sunday with an “AK-47-type assault rifle,” cutting through a fence to avoid metal detectors and other security efforts. He appeared to shoot randomly for less than a minute before three officers confronted him, Smithee said.

- Posted by Rich Miller   55 Comments      


*** UPDATED x1 *** Bustos slammed over DCCC hiring, programs

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* Cheri Bustos was named the chair of the DCCC partly because she won reelection in a blue-collar district won by President Trump. But when you address one issue, others pop up

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee is in full-blown turmoil.

Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Chairwoman Cheri Bustos (D-Ill.) was set to make an unplanned trip to Washington from her district Monday amid an outcry from top black and Latino lawmakers over a lack of diversity in the campaign arm’s senior management ranks.

Bustos’ sudden return to D.C., just days after Congress left for a six-week-long August recess, comes as aides and lawmakers are calling for systematic changes to the DCCC, the party’s main election organ.

POLITICO reported last week that black and Hispanic lawmakers are furious with Bustos’ stewardship of the campaign arm. They say the upper echelon of the DCCC is bereft of diversity, and it is not doing enough to reach Latino voters and hire consultants of color. In addition, several of Bustos’ senior aides have left in the first six months of her tenure, including her chief of staff — a black woman — and her director of mail and polling director, both women.

In the most dramatic move so far, Texas Reps. Vicente Gonzalez and Filemon Vela told POLITICO Sunday that Bustos should fire her top aide, DCCC executive director Allison Jaslow.

* From its story last week

Interviews with more than two dozen Democratic lawmakers, aides and strategists detailed months of frustration and unanswered questions about Bustos’ efforts to retain staffers of color in top positions, boost Latino voter outreach and hire firms run by people of color. They said Bustos was tactless when challenged by lawmakers of color.

“The overall plan for Latino outreach seems to be some 1980s playbook, which doesn’t work anymore,” Rep. Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.) said.

The DCCC declined to make Bustos available for an interview but said the “DCCC has continued to increase diversity amongst our staff.”

“Anyone seeking to divide our party and stoke infighting between Democrats at a time when Donald Trump is in the White House is undermining our ability to protect the majority,” DCCC spokesman Jared Smith said.

Yeah, that’ll keep everyone calm.

More

A DCCC aide also said “nearly 50 percent of the senior staff identifies as racially diverse” but they declined to name a senior staffer who is a person of color.

Sheesh.

*** UPDATE *** Politico

The executive director of the House Democrats’ campaign arm is stepping down amid an outcry from Democratic lawmakers over the lack of diversity in the committee’s senior ranks.

Executive Director Allison Jaslow, a close confidante of Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Chair Cheri Bustos, announced her resignation at an all-staff meeting Monday, according to multiple sources. Jaslow said her resignation is effective immediately.

“When I was in eighth grade, I decided that my life would be dedicated to serving my country. I did that first in uniform but since have tried to be a force of good in our politics,” Jaslow, an Iraq War veteran, said in a statement later. “And sometimes selfless service means having the courage to take a bow for the sake of the mission — especially when the stakes are so high.”

Jaslow’s sudden departure comes as Bustos tries to contain the fury from Democratic lawmakers and aides that she has done little to address the lack of diversity in the upper ranks of the campaign arm since winning the chairmanship late last year.

- Posted by Rich Miller   19 Comments      


The search for affordable housing

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* Rebecca Anzel

Lack of affordable housing affects many facets of family life — access to education and health care, for example — for Illinoisans throughout the state, Sen. Mattie Hunter and Rep. Delia Ramirez say.

It’s a truth the Chicago Democrats said they each experienced before their time in office. Each has a background in social service work — Hunter as a community organizer who grew up in public housing and Ramirez as director of a community social service agency.

Illinois’ affordable housing program received $200 million through the state’s first capital plan in 10 years, signed by Gov. J.B. Pritzker in late June. Other investments totaling about $129 million are included elsewhere in the budget.

And while Hunter and Ramirez said that money will make a “significant difference,” they added it will take $1 billion to properly address the infrastructure need in Illinois.

* Meanwhile

Tucked on the outer edges of southern Cook County, suburban Park Forest was built to help answer a housing shortage in the 1940s as GIs flooded home from World War II. Before long, it became a model of suburban living, featuring enviable public schools and an attractive downtown shopping center anchored by a Marshall Field’s.

Today, the legacy department store is long gone. The high school, Rich East, is facing such low enrollment that it is being considered for closure. And, as of 2017, financially strapped homeowners were stuck with the second-highest property-tax rate in Cook County.

Among them is Ryan Dupée, who is being billed more than $3,800 in property taxes for a modest, ranch-style home he and his wife bought under foreclosure four years ago for just $25,000.

Affordable housing is about more than just rental or purchase costs.

* Speaking of

After a spring spent focusing on possibly bringing a graduated income tax to the state, Illinois lawmakers will soon be turning their attention to the other big tax bill affecting the state’s residents, property taxes.

Specifically, they’ll be looking at ways the state can provide some relief to property taxpayers, even though property taxes themselves are imposed by local governments and the revenue from them finances local government operations. […]

“I’ll hold out optimism that this might come up with some good suggestions on property tax reform, but since I’ve been in the General Assembly the last few years, the issue around property taxes seems to be something that we continue to like to talk about, but we really don’t take a lot of legitimate action on,” said Rep. Tim Butler, R-Springfield, a Republican appointee to the task force.

* Related…

* Chicago’s 3 new apartment-library developments offer fresh take on mixed-use buildings: At each site, the library and residential units maintain separate entrances — and building configurations vary — but the premise is consistent: A neighborhood resource anchored to affordable housing.

* Affordable housing in thriving Naperville is elusive. This mother of twins knows all too well.

* Aldermen seek to address affordable housing, segregation: A group of about 20 aldermen is reintroducing a series of ordinances aimed at increasing affordable housing in Chicago—in some cases, tripling the number of affordable units developers would have to build.

* City Wants To Change Controversial Affordable Housing Ordinance, But Agreement Is Hard To Find

Read more at: https://www.bisnow.com/chicago/news/affordable-housing/city-wants-to-change-controversial-affordable-housing-ordinance-but-agreement-is-hard-to-find-100040?utm_source=CopyShare&utm_medium=Browser

* Lincoln Yards Developer Opens Fleet Fields, The First Small Piece Of $6 Billion Megaproject: Sterling Bay doubled its commitment to on-site affordable housing earlier this year, agreeing to build 600 units within Lincoln Yards, instead of 300, just ahead of a key Zoning Committee vote on the project in March.

* Chicago: a tale of seven cities: The Far South Side lost nearly 100,000 people between 2000 and 2010 and is on track to lose another 80,000 by the end of this decade. The continuing decline offsets gains elsewhere in the city and explains why Chicago’s population has fallen the past few years.

- Posted by Rich Miller   11 Comments      


Another mess that has to be cleaned up

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* The Daily Line’s Hannah Meisel

The state board in charge of reviewing procurement and contracts and leases for property owned or leased by the state of Illinois failed to promptly pay interest due to vendors during the 2018 fiscal year, according to a new audit.

Auditor General Frank Mautino’s office found the Illinois Procurement Policy Board failed to pay interest on 36 percent of vouchers tested by auditors, according to the audit. The board is responsible for hundreds of vouchers every year.

The board blamed the state’s Enterprise Resource Planning system, a project in its fifth year but not completed, that is $150 million over budget, according to another recent audit. That audit also found that the Department of Innovation and Technology, which has run the planning system since it was created by former Gov. Bruce Rauner in 2016, also let bills pile up and accrue $40 million in late payment interest fees in the 2017 and 2018 fiscal years.

ERP was designed to consolidate hundreds of separate financial reporting and computer systems across state government in a single hub, but in the case of the Procurement Policy Board’s audit, the board blamed the technology developed by German company SAP the state has been on-boarding since 2015.

The board said it was “unable to access the interest due in the new ERP/SAP accounting program and, subsequently, were never able to release payments for the prompt pay interest due,” according to the audit.

The audit report is here.

* Earlier Daily Line coverage…

* DoIT overspent by $150M, dinged on all types of deficiencies from cybersecurity to oil changes: audit

- Posted by Rich Miller   20 Comments      


Today’s must-reads

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* Some former Belleville News-Democrat folks have started a news site called the Metro East Meteor. Here’s one of their first stories by George Pawlaczyk and Beth Hundsdorfer

Lying face-up on a gurney, her hands cuffed behind her back and four men holding her down by her arms and legs, Rasha Talafhah fought back the only way she could. She yelled, “Rape!”

Again and again she hollered. “Rape!…Rape!…Rape!”

Finally, someone came to her aid with one word: “Stop!”

The four Illinois Department of Corrections guards let her go and allowed her to sit up. But it was too late.

A physician’s assistant sexually assaulted her when he placed gloved fingers between her thighs and in her vagina during a forced cavity search, according to a federal lawsuit filed by Talafhah.

An Illinois State Police investigative report stated afterward that the physician’s assistant quickly left the room. Later, concerned by Talafhah’s cries of rape, he tearfully asked to be allowed to go home and didn’t report for work the next day. No contraband was found.

Go read the rest. And there’s video. It’s all disturbing.

* And here’s the follow-up. One of the guards who held Talafhah down was Bradley Jenkins

Logan Correction Center guard Allissa Martin was popular with the inmates.

“She treated you with respect. She would listen to you,” said former inmate Rasha Talafhah, who was held for eight years at Logan. “Martin treated you like a person.”

Martin died in June from a fall from the seventh floor of a St. Louis parking garage. Police found Martin’s husband of a week and half, Bradley S. Jenkins, 31, standing over her body, covered in her blood.

Martin, 27, and Jenkins, who was a lieutenant at the prison, attended a Chicago Cubs and St. Louis Cardinals baseball game on June 2. The two argued. At some point during the altercation, police said, Martin rolled video on her cellphone.

Martin pointed the phone at herself, then to Jenkins, according to a probable cause statement.

The video caught Martin yelling at her new husband to stop punching her in the face. Then, she drops the phone.

Shortly after that, St. Louis Police Detective Mark West said, the video captures the sound of Martin’s scream as she falls.

Again, go read the whole thing.

- Posted by Rich Miller   11 Comments      


1.9 billion opioid pills sold to Illinois pharmacies and physicians between 2006 and 2012

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* AP

The maker of OxyContin has been cast as the chief villain in the nation’s opioid crisis. But newly released government figures suggest Purdue Pharma had plenty of help in flooding the U.S. with billions of pills even as overdose deaths were accelerating.

Records kept by the federal Drug Enforcement Administration show that 76 billion oxycodone and hydrocodone pills — the vast majority of them generics, not brand names — were shipped to U.S. pharmacies from 2006 to 2012.

The annual number swelled by more than 50 percent during that period of time even as the body count climbed. The powerful painkillers flowed faster even after Purdue Pharma was fined $635 million for falsely marketing OxyContin as less addictive than other opioids. […]

The Washington Post, which along with HD Media, the owner of newspapers in West Virginia, went to court to seek the information, was first to publish the data.

* Jayme Fraser at GateHouse Media

The database, which The Washington Post released publicly last week, details 380 million times between 2006 and 2012 that manufacturers sold opioids to pharmacies, physicians or other distributors — including shipments of more than 1.9 billion pills to Illinois alone. […]

In Sangamon County, 4.3 million [oxycodone and hydrocodone] pain pills were sent to pharmacies and physicians in 2006 and reached almost 9.4 million in 2011 before dipping the next year to just more than 9 million, a GateHouse Media analysis of the data shows. Another 4.1 million pills were shipped to the surrounding area — Cass, Christian, Logan, Macoupin, Menard, Montgomery and Morgan counties — in 2006. The tally for that area had almost doubled by 2012.

The shipments averaged out to 35 pills per person each year in Sangamon County, with similar rates in Christian, Montgomery and Morgan counties. The rest were lower: 29 in Logan, 26 in Macoupin, 14 in Cass and 11 in Menard. That compares to the national annual average of 37 pills per person and the state average of 30.

The rates varied greatly in Illinois: Scott and Stark counties were shipped fewer than 5 pills per person while Hardin and Saline received more than 85 pills per person The top ten counties in the United States all saw annual rates of more than 155 pills per person.

* CBS 2

In Chicago, the nation’s third-largest city, more than 218 million pills were distributed. But no corner of Illinois was spared, the data shows. From Chicago to tiny communities interspersed between miles of rural land, millions of doses of the heroin-like drugs were bought and sold.

In Rockford, with its population of about 150,000: 53 million doses. In Springfield, the state’s capitol where about 116,000 people lived: 42 million. And in the tiny Lake County community of Old Mill Creek, with a population of just 144, more than 800,000 doses of opioid painkillers were distributed. That’s more than two pills per person every day. […]

Many of the pills — more than 700 million, to be exact — were distributed by Deerfield-based Walgreen’s, the nation’s second-largest distributor of opioids. Many were also sold by Walgreens’ retail stores, as well as at thousands of other storefront pharmacies in communities seemingly everywhere.

Those storefront pharmacies distributed and sold vast numbers of pills. A single pharmacy in Des Plaines described as a “long term care pharmacy” distributed nearly 16.5 million doses.

* Related…

* How to download and use the DEA pain pills database

- Posted by Rich Miller   17 Comments      


*** UPDATED x1 *** Pritzker on possible Madigan probe: “It’s hard to tell what it’s really all about”

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* Ahern…



* Pritzker reiterated that he wants to wait and see the process play out before making any public stands. He also said he had not been contacted by the feds. Pressed on whether he still has “confidence in Speaker Madigan,” Pritzker responded

Well, again, we’re moving forward. Allegations are just that. And, so we’ll see. I haven’t actually seen what those allegations might be. I mean, I think at this point there are a number of people who have been contacted, you know, we’ve read the stories that you all have put out, but it’s hard to tell what it’s really all about.

* Meanwhile

A GoFundMe page has been set up by the family of Kevin Quinn — a former top political operative to Illinois Speaker Mike Madigan — who has been embroiled in many controversies, including a contentious divorce and federal authorities reportedly looking into payments he received from Madigan-related lobbyists.

The fundraising page, “Help Our Brother Kevin Rebuild His Life,” went up Sunday morning. It was created Quinn’s sisters Katie and Meghan. Quinn on Monday confirmed to the Chicago Sun-Times that the page is authentic.

“Over the last 17 months, we’ve watched our kind hearted brother remain stronger than you could ever imagine as he’s been dragged through the mud by one false and misleading news story after the other,” the page says. “In the midst of a turbulent divorce and insurmountable negative media attention, legal bills have stacked up. We have seen first hand the adversity Kevin has encountered and felt compelled to start this campaign because he needs our help to get the truth out there! The truth is Kevin is honest, sincere, and all around a great person.”

…Adding… ILGOP…

“The Speaker needs to come clean in the #MeToo cover-up of his political organization. Madigan hired a politically connected lawyer to ‘investigate’ sexual harassment when that lawyer’s own family members were funneling money to his top operative who had been fired for sexual harassment. It’s clear Speaker Madigan does not take the mistreatment of women seriously, and he doesn’t intend to sincerely investigate and stop the #MeToo behavior in his political operation.” - Illinois Republican Party Spokesman Joe Hackler

Recently, it was reported by the Chicago Sun-Times that “Kelly Smith-Haley was retained by Madigan in February 2018 to ‘receive and investigate harassment allegations’ regarding the speaker’s political staff…” according to a letter from Speaker Madigan to House Democratic Caucus members and staffers. Smith-Haley is the sister of Bill and Mike Smith, both of whom are senior members of the lobbying firm, Cornerstone Government Affairs.

It was reported by the Chicago Tribune and detailed in an ILGOP release that Cornerstone wrote two $1,000 checks to Kevin Quinn in January 2019. Cornerstone’s Vice President is Will Cousineau, Mike Madigan’s longest serving political director.

As if it wasn’t bad enough that Madigan’s friends and allies have been keeping Quinn on the team’s ghost payroll, the lawyer tasked with investigating Quinn’s sexual harassment is a close relative of individuals financially supporting him. It’s obvious that Madigan’s claim of wanting to change the culture of his boy’s club could not be more disingenuous.

*** UPDATE *** Greg Bishop at Center Square

Treasurer Michael Frerichs in Springfield on Monday said it was business as usual with Madigan’s office.

“I’m following the news just like anyone out there waiting to see what they discover,” Frerichs said. “[Madigan is] still the Speaker of the House. We work with other elected officials to accomplish our agenda and we’ll follow this case just like other people.”

Messages seeking comment from Madigan’s spokesman were not immediately returned.

- Posted by Rich Miller   25 Comments      


Indiana gearing up to fend off Chicago, south suburban casinos

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* Abdel Jimenez at the Tribune

As Chicago considers five possible locations for a casino, an Indiana gambling facility just across the state line is making expansion plans of its own.

Spectacle Entertainment, which owns two Lake Michigan riverboat casinos in Gary, announced plans earlier this month to move those gambling operations to a 40-acre site adjacent to Interstate 80/94.

It will partner with Hard Rock to manage the new $400 million casino property, which will be just 18 miles from the “Harborside” location at 111th Street and the Bishop Ford Freeway, one of the five possible casino sites Chicago has selected for consultants to study.

The timing of Spectacle’s announcement, just a month after Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed a bill that expands gambling in Illinois and allows for the construction of a large Chicago casino, is no coincidence.

Spectacle and other casino companies in northwest Indiana have seen the amount of money they win from gamblers slide during the past decade, and they are moving aggressively to hang on to Chicago-area players who travel to the Hoosier State to gamble. The four northwestern Indiana casinos run free daily shuttle buses that pick up Illinois gamblers from various locations.

* Casino.org

Hard Rock Casino Gary construction could begin as early as September and be completed by the end of next year — if owner Spectacle Entertainment gets required city and Indiana state approvals over the summer.

Spectacle officials told the Gary Plan Commission this week the approximately 200,000 square foot, $400 million venue planned for a vacant parcel near the Borman Expressway is scheduled to open on Dec. 31, 2020. Following that, the company is expecting an adjacent hotel and parking garage would open in 2022 or 2023.

The commission unanimously approved the casino last Tuesday.

“We originally envisioned to do that all in one fell swoop, but then along came Illinois [casino expansion] and that sort of set us back on our heels a little bit,” John Keeler, Spectacle vice president and general counsel, was quoted by Inside Indiana Business. “But we’re committed to this project and committed to doing it in two phases.”

* The Tribune editorial board points to this passage in Illinois law

In addition, prior to the Board issuing the owners license authorized under paragraph (4) of subsection (e-5), an impact study shall be completed to determine what location in the city will provide the greater impact to the region, including the creation of jobs and the generation of tax revenue.

And all but says the statute means the city casino will have to be downtown

Today we aren’t suggesting any particular site. We’re instead keeping three points top-of-mind:

· Illinois is expanding gambling to collect more tax revenue and create jobs — but mostly for tax revenue. We can’t fathom why a casino in one location would deliver substantially more jobs than in another.

· Casino operators aren’t neighborhood improvement societies. They’re businesses, each looking for the most lucrative return on their investments.

· So the question becomes: Which — if any — Chicago location would produce the biggest windfall?

* Related…

* Sun-Times editorial: Understaffed Gaming Board needs a fast bulking up

- Posted by Rich Miller   19 Comments      


It’s mostly show business

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* My weekly syndicated newspaper column

Most state legislators don’t have to worry about next year’s general election. The combination of gerrymandering and the simple fact that many of the state’s regions are dominated by one party or the other pretty much guarantees that all but a handful of incumbents will sail through on the November ballot.

But first they have to survive the primary season. A Chicago Democrat has to worry about March 17, 2020, infinitely more than Nov. 3. The same goes for most Downstate Republicans.

And the most vulnerable of those are newbies who’ve taken controversial votes. Rep. Mark Kalish, D-Chicago, was appointed to his seat in January and then flip-flopped on the abortion issue and voted against the Reproductive Health Act, making him one of the most vulnerable House Democrats.

Other freshmen have other issues. Appointed Rep. Cam Buckner, D-Chicago, got pulled over in Springfield for allegedly driving while intoxicated and there’s video.

Smart incumbents are out walking precincts every day and attending events. The Democrats also have legislative accomplishments they can highlight to keep people from challenging them from their left. The Reproductive Health Act is just one of them; so is legalizing cannabis and cracking down on gun dealers. Republicans can use their “No” votes on those same bills to help prevent primary challenges.

But there are other ways to fend off intra-party opposition.

Rep. Terri Bryant, R-Murphysboro, for instance, voted to increase the motor fuel tax and related license fees in May to fund the capital bill. Despite the vast number of benefits that new roads and bridges will bring to her district, voting with the super-majority Democrats to jack up the gas tax isn’t gonna make her a lot of friends on the right.

So, when a controversy erupted in Bryant’s region over the governor’s cancellation of the scheduled performance of a band called Confederate Railroad at the Du Quoin State Fair, she defended southern “culture” and demanded that Snoop Dogg’s Illinois State Fair performance also be canceled because of an album cover photo portraying an American flag-draped body with a “Trump” toe tag and the caption “Make America Crip Again.”

President Donald Trump won Bryant’s district by 28 points in 2016. It’s not uncommon to see Confederate flag decals on cars and trucks in Bryant’s deep southern Illinois district. It’s distasteful to say, but this was a no-brainer for Bryant. She’d much rather her constituents be focused on this “issue” than tax hikes, particularly during the summer months when folks decide whether to run in the primary. That band’s cancellation was a campaign gift and she should send the governor a thank you card.

Rep. Chris Miller, R-Oakland, and most of what’s known as the far-right Eastern Bloc were elected for the first time last year. It’s almost impossible to attack them on their right flanks because they all hewed to a solidly far-right line — there’s just no room over there. But it’s easy to get lost in the shuffle, so organizing rallies around the “issue” of kicking Chicago out of Illinois helps Miller and the rest stand out.

When Rep. Miller (no relation) tried picking an online fight with Rep. Bryant and House Republican Leader Jim Durkin over the gas tax hike and subsequently lost his House public relations staffer, he elevated his profile even more and helped solidify his reputation as somebody who stands up for southern Illinois values, as he defines them. Frankly, I’m a little surprised that other Eastern Bloc members haven’t yet pulled the same stunt. It sure “worked” for Miller, who might want to send Leader Durkin a bowl of fruit in thanks.

The right wing is fond of calling stuff like this “virtue signaling.” And while they use the term mainly as a slam on the left wing, they also engage in it just about all the time.

Some feel the need to prove they are “pure,” so they do stuff like post stupid Facebook memes about the “Jihad Squad” (last Monday’s controversy), or, on the other wing, compare the Ku Klux Klan to Trump (last Tuesday’s controversy).

While it’s fine sport to watch them stumble all over themselves after being outed for their ridiculousness, it’s also important to remember that this often serves a purpose: Riling up and unifying the base ahead of primary season.

Candidates can start circulating nominating petitions in 42 days. Prepare yourself for more of this stuff. There’s just no getting around it.

Rep. Miller and other Eastern Bloc members just announced they’re hosting an Effingham concert by, you guessed it, Confederate Railroad.

- Posted by Rich Miller   12 Comments      


New laws

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* WGLT

A new state law will protect victims of sexual assault from being arrested due to outstanding warrants or fines when reporting the crime.

House Bill 92 was recently signed into law by Gov. JB Pritzker and sponsored by State Sen. Jason Barickman, a Bloomington Republican.

Previously, when a sexual assault survivor came into contact with police, like when going to the hospital for treatment, they could be arrested for any outstanding warrants, even for minor non-violent offenses or unpaid fines. The new law requires police officials to request a waiver of the required execution of the warrant as long as it isn’t for a violent offense or parole violation.

* Tribune

All single-occupancy public restrooms in Illinois must be designated as gender-neutral beginning Jan. 1 under a law Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed Friday.

The legislation, sponsored by Democratic state Sen. Melinda Bush of Grayslake, prohibits signs outside any single-occupancy public restroom from designating a specific gender. The measure was approved unanimously in the Senate and by a vote of 109-5 in the House this spring.

“Making single-occupancy restrooms gender neutral is inclusive, but it also just makes sense,” Bush said in a statement. “It’s a small change that will make a big impact for thousands of Illinoisans.”

Bush called it “a common-sense measure that will benefit individuals who don’t identify as male or female as well as parents and caregivers who have dependents of the opposite sex.”

* AP

Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed legislation Friday that makes Illinois the eighth state to remove time restrictions on prosecuting crimes of sexual violence.

The Democrat signed into law a measure that lifts a 10-year statute of limitations on pressing charges in felony cases of sexual assault and sexual abuse.

The law, which takes effect Jan. 1, is key for sex-crime victims, who sometimes are too traumatized or overwhelmed to immediately pursue criminal charges against their attackers, said Carrie Ward, executive director of the Illinois Coalition Against Sexual Assault.

In 2017, Illinois abolished time limits on prosecuting sex crimes against victims younger than 18. Although current law for adult victims allows prosecution within 10 years, the time limit is actually less. The victim must have first reported the crime to authorities within three years.

* Capitol News Illinois

Gov. JB Pritzker surpassed 100 bills signed as he put his signature on more than 30 new laws last week. They included a measure to increase penalties on texting drivers who cause great bodily harm, and another to allow certain recipients of food stamps to use them at state-contracted restaurants.

House Bill 2386, which passed 82-24 in the House and 41-0 in the Senate, gives the secretary of state new authority to suspend or revoke a license for 12 months for any driver causing great bodily harm, disfigurement or death in an accident caused while texting and driving. The bill also imposes a $1,000 fine for the same offense, which is classified as “aggravated use of an electronic communication device.”

* Center Square

House Bill 2209: Property taxpayers will now know how much they’re paying for incentives to developers. The measure requires property tax bills to include a list of Tax Increment Finance, or TIF districts in the area and the dollar amount of tax allocated to each TIF district. TIF dollars come from any increased property tax revenue for a given period and is used as incentives to spur development in blighted areas.


…Adding…
Press release…

Surrounded by consumer advocates at Chicago Volunteer Legal Services, Governor JB Pritzker signed the bipartisan Consumer Fairness Act into law Monday, giving millions of Illinoisans relief from high interest on consumer debt.

“Consumer debt is at an all-time high all across the United States, and there are millions of people, including too many Illinois families, who are struggling under unconscionable circumstances,” said Governor JB Pritzker. “Today, here in Illinois, we are giving real relief to those who are simply trying to pay off their debts, so they can end the cycle of debt they are trapped in.”

With one in three Illinois residents in the debt collection process according to the Heartland Alliance, the new law takes two steps to protect Illinois residents from crushing debt.

Helping families avoid the cycle of debt that prevents them from building long-term financial security, the new law lowers post-judgment interest rates on consumer debt under $25,000 from 9% to 5%. It also reduces the timeframe to collect on a judgment from 26 to 17 years by limiting revivals, preventing debt collectors from trapping families in debt with judgments that are decades old.

HB 88 was passed unanimously without opposition from debt collectors and other financial institutions. The new law takes effect January 1, 2020.

“Debt can be a real, crushing thing that keeps people trapped in a cycle of poverty,” said Assistant Senate Majority Leader Iris Martinez. “By making it easier for people to make payments, we are not only making it more likely for the debt to be paid but also helping people move toward financial independence.”

“Millions of Illinoisans struggle with consumer debt, and our laws have allowed far too many of them to get trapped in an endless cycle of collections,” said Rep. Will Guzzardi. “Today, we’re putting reasonable limits on debt collection to protect people from predation and help them get back on their feet. HB 88 is a significant reform for justice and fairness in our state, and I’m honored to have been a part of its passage.”

- Posted by Rich Miller   5 Comments      


*** UPDATED x1 *** Pritzker shifts on Trump impeachment

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* April 23

Democrats across the country may be split about whether President Donald Trump should be impeached following the release of the Mueller report, but Gov. J.B. Pritzker on Monday said he has seen nothing to change his mind.

“Well, I was right two years ago when I called for his impeachment, and I’m right today. I’m sticking by that,” Pritzker told the Sun-Times.

* July 27

Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker, who first called two years ago for Trump’s impeachment, said in an interview that, for tactical reasons, he is no longer certain if Democrats should pursue impeachment.

“I think that we’re now a year and a quarter away from the general election, and so I think there is a question, could you actually accomplish the goal of removing the president by impeachment before he would be removed by virtue of the election,” Pritzker said. “It’s a question of timing: How long would that take, how effective would that be?”

*** UPDATE *** The governor was asked about the above comment today and he appeared to back away from backing away. He talked about the amount of time it took to start the investigative process in the Congress, but then said

I think he should be out of office as soon as humanly possible. So the only question to me is, is that gonna happen with an impeachment process or is that gonna happen with an election.

…Adding… Bernie

“It does sound like he’s going all in … on the Illinois is a progressive state thing,” said CHRIS MOONEY, professor of political science at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

“The way he’s talking is unusual in the state of Illinois,” Mooney added, saying politics has tended to be more middle-of-the-road.

“But he’s taken a different approach,” Mooney said.

“That may be because he sees demographic trends and political trends in this state moving in that direction, and he wants to get ahead of it,” Mooney said. “It may be because that’s just who he is and that’s what he wants to do and he’s been elected and now he’s going to do it. Or it may be because he’s a neophyte.”

Mooney noted Pritzker’s statements on abortion “really got under the nerves of a lot of right-wing Republicans,” and the cancellation of the Confederate Railroad concert could have been done “without the flamboyant rhetoric.”

- Posted by Rich Miller   72 Comments      


*** LIVE COVERAGE ***

Monday, Jul 29, 2019

* Follow along with ScribbleLive


- Posted by Rich Miller   Comments Off      


Reader comments closed for the weekend

Friday, Jul 26, 2019

* Some late Friday news before we head to the weekend…

* Gov. J.B. Pritzker signs law requiring one-person public bathrooms be gender-neutral

* Law removes time limit on sex-crimes prosecution

* Governor signs Crowe’s initiative to protect personal genetic data

* Taj Mahal and Keb’ Mo’ will play us out

Looks like silver, shines like Klondike gold

- Posted by Rich Miller   Comments Off      


Question of the day

Friday, Jul 26, 2019

* Heh…


* The Question: The new gaming law allows the city to put slots at Midway and O’Hare behind the security. Are you in favor of that? Take the poll and then explain your answer in comments, please…


survey solutions

- Posted by Rich Miller   21 Comments      


Protected: SUBSCRIBERS ONLY - Fundraiser list

Friday, Jul 26, 2019

This post is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

- Posted by Rich Miller   Comments Off      


Unclear on the concept

Friday, Jul 26, 2019

* From the Boycott Du Quoin State Fair Facebook page

WSIL Tv just said Pritzger and his wife are expected to be at the fair for the parade…well isn’t that just wonderful 😕

* A sampling of the react

David Mestel is right. The hotheads appear to be unaware that the parade route is wholly within the fairgrounds (click here for the map). So the only way they can attend is to abandon their boycott.

Also, the executive protection folks might want to take a look at some of those comments.

* Meanwhile, the Illinois Times reported on a bit of state history this week

Twenty-two years before Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, he won an Illinois State Supreme Court case that freed Nance Legins-Costley.

Legins-Costley was an indentured servant in the eyes of the law, but, by all rights, she was a slave. She’d never been free. Neither she nor anyone else ever signed paperwork giving up her liberty. Nonetheless, she was bought and sold, first while still in the womb, when an Illinois state senator bought her parents. But the state Supreme Court ruled her a free woman after Lincoln took up her cause as a lawyer.

“It is a presumption of law, in the state of Illinois, that every person is free, without regard to color,” the court ruled. “The sale of a free person is illegal.”

Carl Adams, a former Alton resident who’s written a book about Legins-Costley, has been looking for her grave since the 1990s. Finally, he says he’s found it, thanks to help from a cast of amateur historians, a librarian and a dedicated genealogist. Legins-Costley, it turns out, may be beneath a Peoria parking lot, next to a muffler shop, alongside Civil War veterans and others whose graves were forgotten over the years.

* And…

* Blood in the Streets: A hundred years ago, Chicago experienced the worst spasm of racial violence in the city’s history. Here’s how the riot unfolded, in the words of those who lived it.

* It’s Been 100 Years: Is Chicago Finally Ready To Reckon With the City’s 1919 Race Riots?: Not talking about the 1919 race riots has been the Chicago Way for 100 years, but ignoring one of the ugliest periods in the city’s history is hampering its present and future.

* Editorial: Chicago’s race riots of 1919 and the epilogue that resonates today

* Segregation among issues Chicago faces 100 years after riots

* Before Chicago erupted into race riots in 1919, Carl Sandburg reported on the fissures

* Mapping Chicago’s 1919 race riots

* Chicago Organizations Commemorate 100th Anniversary of Race Riots

* Chicago’s Red Summer

* 1919 Race Riots bike tour travels 100 years back to city’s most violent week

…Adding… Despicable

A vandalized Mississippi memorial to civil-rights activist Emmett Till will be replaced by a new bulletproof sign, the Emmett Till Memorial Commission said on Friday. The move comes one day after it was announced that three University of Mississippi students had been suspended from their fraternity for posing with guns in front of the bullet-riddled sign, which marks where murdered 14-year-old Till’s body was found in 1955.

- Posted by Rich Miller   75 Comments      


*** UPDATED x1 - Senate sponsor responds *** Pritzker vetoes first bill, says he needs “flexibility to innovate” on healthcare

Friday, Jul 26, 2019

* Senate Bill 2026 was somewhat of a delayed reaction to fears that former Gov. Bruce Rauner would apply for a federal waiver to reduce health insurance coverage, including narrowing pre-existing conditions. Legislators wanted to make sure no governor would do that in the future

Prohibits the State from applying for any federal waiver that would reduce or eliminate any protection or coverage required under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) that was in effect on January 1, 2017, including, but not limited to, any protection for persons with pre-existing conditions and coverage for services identified as essential health benefits under the ACA. Provides that the State or an agency of the executive branch may apply for such a waiver only if granted authorization by the General Assembly through joint resolution. Amends the Illinois Insurance Code. Prohibits the State from applying for any federal waiver that would permit an individual or group health insurance plan to reduce or eliminate any protection or coverage required under the ACA that was in effect on January 1, 2017, including, but not limited to, any protection for persons with pre-existing conditions and coverage for services identified as essential health benefits under the ACA. Provides that the State or an agency of the executive branch may apply for such a waiver only if granted authorization by the General Assembly through joint resolution. Amends the Illinois Public Aid Code. Prohibits the State or an agency of the executive branch from applying for any federal Medicaid waiver that would result in more restrictive standards, methodologies, procedures, or other requirements than those that were in effect in Illinois as of January 1, 2017 for the Medical Assistance Program, the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or any other medical assistance program in Illinois operating under any existing federal waiver authorized by specified provisions of the Social Security Act. Provides that the State or an agency of the executive branch may apply for such a waiver only if granted authorization by the General Assembly through joint resolution.

The bill passed the Senate 56-0 and the House 75-41.

* Gov. Pritzker vetoed the bill today, his first. If you can’t read his veto message, click the pic for a better view

His Medicaid buy-in idea, which he talked about a lot during the campaign, might possibly require some federal waivers.

Thoughts?

…Adding… Center Square

State Rep. David McSweeney, R-Barrington Hills, voted against the bill, but had a mixed reaction to the veto message.

“Great decision by the governor, bad bill, and he’s exactly right that we have to keep that flexibility,” McSweeney said. “The place that I disagree with him is that he says he’s not going to actively seek those waivers. He should be seeking those.”

McSweeney has for years urged the state to seek waivers for ways to save taxpayers money. He said the state could file waivers with the federal government to shore up eligibility for certain programs, or to find innovative ways to capture more federal tax dollars to offset the state taxpayer cost.

“Ways that we can look at improving our access to federal funding, ways to address vouchers, ways to address tightening up eligibility, that should all be on the table,” McSweeney said. “Now I want to be clear, the governor is saying none of that.”

*** UPDATE *** GOP Sen. Sue Rezin, the chief Senate sponsor…

As I am driving to my brother’s funeral today the irony of the Governor’s first veto is not lost. My brother drove a semi truck his entire life. He was a hard worker but like many people lived paycheck to paycheck. Often times he made just enough to get by but too much to be covered by Medicaid. His entire life he struggled to access the healthcare system because of his preexisting conditions and his inability to afford health insurance. Jim did not go to the doctor when he was having symptoms because he couldn’t afford to. This bill was passed unanimously in the Senate and would have guaranteed health insurance coverage for hard working people, such as my brother, who have preexisting conditions.

Jim was 58 years old.

She was not given a heads up before the veto was announced. Bad form.

- Posted by Rich Miller   10 Comments      


Lightfoot again worries publicly that potential casino owner profits aren’t high enough

Friday, Jul 26, 2019

* WTTW

Mayor Lori Lightfoot says she will seek public input on possible locations for a Chicago casino in a survey her office plans to release Friday.

“This is going to be a robust survey that is really the first step in thinking about where a casino should be in Chicago,” Lightfoot said during an appearance Thursday on “Chicago Tonight.” “That’s part of what the feasibility study is going to study: where is the best location.”

Last week, the mayor named five potential sites on the South and West sides for an outside group to study, but two aldermen have already nixed sites in their wards. Lightfoot said those sites aren’t the only possibilities – a casino could ultimately land elsewhere in the city. But she says a casino might not even be financially viable, with a structure that calls for a private operator to keep only a third of the revenue, with a third going to the city and a third to the state.

“But really, can we finance a casino based upon this tax structure that the General Assembly has put in place so far. We’re concerned about it. We think it takes too much money out of the pockets of a potential casino operator before the doors would even open. So that’s what we’re concerned about: Can we even finance this deal in the first instance,” she said.

She has mentioned the topic of potential Chicago casino profits, or the lack thereof, several times, going back to when the bill was still being drafted. The revenues will be divided three ways, with the city, the state and the owner all getting a third.

* From the new state law

Within 45 days after the effective date of this amendatory Act of the 101st General Assembly, the consultant shall prepare and deliver to the Board a study concerning the feasibility of, and the ability to finance, a casino in the City of Chicago.

I asked Sen. Terry Link, the bill’s co-sponsor, about a similar statement from Mayor Lightfoot late last month. His reply

I think the mayor, with all due respect, is getting a little ahead of herself. Let’s see what the report comes back in… it may say ‘This is a great investment, you’re gonna make a lot of money,’ it may say something else. We don’t know.

If that study finds that the casino wouldn’t make enough money, legislators have pledged to alter the law during the veto session.

* Some casino interests have also expressed doubt about the profit split and up-front fees

Tim Wilmott, chief executive officer of Penn National Gaming Inc., said a high tax rate and other conditions laid down by Illinois legislators could make a casino project in downtown Chicago a bad bet. […]

[W]hichever operator builds the sole Chicago project, including the airport rights, will have to pay $120 million for licensing and fees, and hand over up to two-thirds of the revenue to the city and state, according to Wilmott. Slot machines in airports are less profitable, making those a tougher proposition, he said. […]

A spokesman for Las Vegas Sands Corp. said his company, which specializes in large, convention-oriented resorts, isn’t interested in Chicago. Caesars Entertainment Corp., another Illinois operator, hasn’t taken a public position. Matt Maddox, the CEO of Wynn Resorts Ltd., which this month opened a $2.6 billion resort near Boston, said that property could serve as a model for other big-city casinos. […]

“I’ve always had the mindset that if I had a choice of a great suburban location or a great urban, city location, I would always take the suburban location first,” Wilmott said.

- Posted by Rich Miller   11 Comments      


It’s just a bill

Friday, Jul 26, 2019

* Center Square

An Illinois lawmaker has filed legislation that would allow legislators to turn down any new salary increases after he saw the backlash over the raise they voted themselves in June coinciding with a number of tax hikes, including a doubling of the state’s gas tax.

Rep. Maurice West, a Democrat from Rockford, says accepting a raise while taking more money from constituents sends the wrong message.

“This is the time that we should focus on ensuring that funds spent are for the benefit of the people that we represent, not ourselves,” he said. “Now is the wrong time and timing is everything.”

His legislation would allow lawmakers to opt-out of their annual cost-of-living increase, sending it to pay down the state’s pension debt instead. State law currently says lawmakers have to accept those pay hikes.

Turning away the pay hike is all the more important, West said, since his district consists of blue-collar workers who are going to feel the effects of things like the doubling of the state’s motor fuel tax to 38 cents a gallon, which he voted for.

* But one member didn’t wait for a law

Illinois lawmakers are getting the bigger paychecks they voted for themselves in June, but one state representative has sent his back to the state’s coffers.

Illinois lawmakers have received their cost-of-living adjustments that were included in a fiscal year 2019 budget bill.

State Rep. David McSweeney, R-Barrington Hills, worked with Comptroller Susana Mendoza to have his raise returned to the state. […]

It’s not legal for lawmakers or constitutional officers to outright refuse their pay. McSweeney said he had been working with Mendoza’s office on sending the raise that he objected to back into the state’s coffers.

“The law says ‘should’ so you have to actually take it,” McSweeney said. […]

“The state’s coffers are happy to accept any little bit of help folks can spare so if anyone wants to donate their cost-of-living adjustment back to the General Revenue Fund, we will be happy to work with them on it,” said Abdon Pallasch, spokesman for Comptroller Susana Mendoza.

No other state lawmakers have inquired about returning raises, Pallasch said.

- Posted by Rich Miller   22 Comments      


Report: $5 million in campaign funds drawn for personal purposes since 1998 law took effect

Friday, Jul 26, 2019

* This sound reasoning is why legislators in 1998 voted to ban people from using their campaign funds as their own personal bank accounts

Campaign funds, after all, primarily come from money given by special interests who contribute based on a desire to influence those in power. When campaign money is treated as personal funds, then every contribution is a prospective bribe.

A freshman state Senator by the name of Barack Obama was a co-sponsor of that bill and labeled the practice “legalized bribery.” Click here for background.

But since the law took effect on July 1, 1998, they decided to grandfathered in all campaign account balances as of June 30.

Some of the more brazen types took out loans as the deadline approached to beef up their campaign account balances. Not everyone on this list did so for nefarious purposes, however.

* Mark Brown counted at least 55 people who took money out of their campaign accounts for personal use after the law took effect for a total of more than $5 million

Sen. James Clayborne Jr., D-Belleville (2019) $42,204

Chicago Ald. Margaret Laurino (39th) (2019) $27,789

Sen. Emil Jones, D-Chicago (2014-19) $210,613

Chicago Ald. William J.P. Banks (36th) (2018) $291,708

Sen. Christine Radogno, R-Lemont (2018) $36,157

Rep. Dan Burke, D-Chicago (2016) $94,450

Schiller Park Mayor Anna Montana (2016) $45,534

Cook County Commissioner Bobbie Steele (2016) $28,000

Chicago Ridge President Eugene Siegel (2015) $12,022

Rep. Carolyn Krause, R-Mount Prospect (2011-2014) $55,464

Sen. James DeLeo, D-Chicago (2013) $271,681

Rep. Angelo “Skip” Saviano, R-Elmwood Park (2012-13) $219,093

Sen. George Shadid, D-Edwards (2012-13) $152,546

Rep. Maggie Crotty, D-Oak Forest (2013) $6,444

Rep. Jerry Mitchell, R-Sterling (2013) $23,232

Mark Morrissey (Comm for Good Govt) (2011) $55,139

Committeeman James Battista (R-36th) (2010) $17,574

Chicago City Clerk James Laski (2008-10) $130,977

Rep. Ralph Capparelli, D-Chicago (2006-10) $583,357

Rep. Margaret Parcells, R-Northfield (2009) $15,671

Harwood Heights Mayor Ray Willas (2009) $25,526

Cook County Cmsr. William Beavers, D-Chicago (2005-09) $87,149

Rep. Kurt Granberg, D-Carlyle (2009) $50,000

Country Club Hills Mayor Dwight Welch (2008-09). $11,586

DuPage County Judge Cary Pierce (2008) $18,542

Rep. Anne Zickus, R-Palos Hills (2003-08) $18,513

Rep. Robert Bugielski, D-Chicago (2005-07) $15,899

Sen. James “Pate” Philip, R-Wood Dale (2003-06) $274,964

Lt. Gov. Corinne Wood (2006) $72,227

Sen. Kathleen Parker, R-Northbrook (2005) $26,301

Rep. Steve Davis, D-Bethalto (2005) $40,835

Rep. N. Duane Noland, R-Blue Mound (2005) $7,953

Sen. Laura Kent Donahue, R-Quincy (2005) $15,114

Sen. Robert Madigan, R-Lincoln (2001-05) $264,519

Sen. Walter Dudycz, R-Chicago (2004) $136,700

Sen. William Marovitz, D-Chicago (2004) $65,728

Rep. Charles Hartke, D-Teutopolis (2004) $9,100

Sen. Aldo DeAngelis, R-Olympia Fields (2002-04) $194,001

Rep. J. Philip Novak, D-Bradle (2003-04) $99,120

Rep. Bruce Farley, D-Chicago (2003) $53,033

Harvey Mayor Nick Graves (2003) $35,000

McHenry County Sheriff George Hendle (2003) $31,922

Rep. Harold Murphy, D-Markham (2003) $26,987

Sen. Doris Karpiel, R-Carol Stream (2003) $24,153

Rep. Terry Steczo, D-Oak Forest (2003) $15,226

Rep. Vincent Persico, R-Glen Ellyn (2003) $10,000

Comptroller Loleta Didrickson (2000-02) $310,411

Rep. Joel Brunsvold, D-Milan (2002) $150,475

Rep. Jim Durkin, R-Western Springs (2002) $40,000

Sen. Howard Carroll, D-Chicago (2001) $61,841

Cook County Judge Thomas Zafiratos (2001) $39,969

Calumet City Mayor Jerry Genova (2001) $21,163

Melrose Park Mayor C. August Taddeo (2000) $235,723

Sen. William Laurino, D-Chicago (2000) $85,000

Sen. James Rea, D-Christopher (1999-2000) $127,500

Click here for Mark’s take.

- Posted by Rich Miller   18 Comments      


The case of Thomas J. Franzen

Friday, Jul 26, 2019

* June 6

A suburban man who, according to his defense attorney, bought over 40 pounds of drug-infused candy to self-medicate as he battled cancer, was sentenced to four years in prison.

Thomas J. Franzen, 37, pleaded guilty to marijuana possession in exchange for the sentence, the Kane County state’s attorney’s office said.

In a statement, prosecutors said they dropped the more serious charge of drug trafficking that carries a minimum sentence of 12 years in “recognition of the seriousness of Mr. Franzen’s medical condition.” […]

In 2014, authorities found a 42 pounds of THC-infused chocolate in a package shipped from California to Franzen’s home in west suburban Montgomery, prosecutors said.

Officers later searched Franzen’s home and found cocaine, over 100 additional grams of marijuana and other items used for drug dealing, prosecutors said. They allegedly found a digital scale, $2,000 in cash, ledgers used to track drug sales and packaging materials.

* Same date

Franzen has stage four cancer and was using the chocolates to “self-medicate” and relieve himself from symptoms, such as nausea, [defense attorney David Camic] said.

According to an August 2018 court petition for an expert to evaluate whether Franzen was fit to stand trial, Franzen was suffering from testicular cancer that had spread to his lungs and abdominal cavity.

According to the motion, Franzen also had a reoccurrence of renal cell cancer in one of his kidneys, and Camic was concerned Franzen could not assist in his defense by providing an “accurate recitation of the facts” of the case. It was unclear whether a judge heard from an expert before Franzen’s guilty plea late last week.

Franzen gets credit for seven days served at the Kane County jail before he could post bond. He also can have his prison term cut in half for good behavior.

* June 14

After Franzen’s guilty plea, Kane County State’s Attorney Joe McMahon said members of the North Central Narcotics Task Force, a unit of the state police, searched Franzen’s home after his arrest and found “evidence of drug dealing,” such as ledgers, more than $2,000, a digital scale, hashish oil, paraphernalia, and receipts for packages he mailed across the country and Canada. […]

Camic disagreed with McMahon’s assessment, arguing Franzen was reselling items on eBay and other online sites.

“My client was not selling drugs,” Camic said. “What he was selling was sneakers, vintage clothing, vintage toys and sporting goods.”

* Yesterday

A Montgomery cancer patient sentenced to four years in prison for having 42 pounds of THC-infused chocolates mailed to his home in 2014 has petitioned Gov. Pritzker for a pardon or to have the sentence commuted so he can receive treatment at home.

Since he was sent to prison last month, Thomas J. Franzen, 37, has lost 20 pounds and is not getting the medical care he was promised, according to his petition filed by attorney David Camic. […]

In the petition, Camic details his client’s turbulent childhood and history of fighting various forms of cancer, which began with testicular cancer that now has spread to his lungs and other organs. The petition also notes Franzen was one of the first Illinois residents to receive a medical marijuana card in 2016 and this was his first conviction of any kind. […]

“His crime was motivated by an attempt to mitigate his pain and symptoms through the use of cannabis. His medical need to use cannabis is verified and supported by the fact he was granted a medical use card,” read part of the petition.

The petition also included letters and other documentation from his doctor, along with 19 letters of support from friends, his employer and relatives, including his uncle Chuck Nelson, who also serves as Aurora deputy mayor.

* Sun-Times

On Thursday, Pritzker’s press secretary Jordan Abudayyeh confirmed that the governor will “review the request.” David Camic, Franzen’s attorney, said he and his client are “gratified that the governor is reviewing our petition.”

“If he gives it the careful consideration we know he will that he will at minimum commute Mr. Franzen’s sentence,” said Camic, who submitted the petition on behalf of Franzen.

Thoughts?

- Posted by Rich Miller   41 Comments      


*** UPDATED x2 - Rosemont responds *** Report: Feds eyeing Rosemont

Friday, Jul 26, 2019

* Robert Herguth at the Sun-Times

Rosemont and the Stephens family who have run the northwest suburb since its founding are again under scrutiny, with the FBI questioning current and former village employees, sources have told the Chicago Sun-Times. […]

In 2015, Rosemont officials awarded a contract to Monterrey Security Consultants, Inc., to oversee security at public venues including Allstate Arena, the Rosemont Theatre and the village-owned Donald E. Stephens Convention Center. Records show Monterrey has been paid roughly $5 million for the work, which was awarded without Rosemont officials seeking competitive bids from other security firms. […]

They said the FBI’s interest appeared to be wide-ranging and included questions about whether members of the department — made up of cross-trained police officers and firefighters — illegally used and distributed narcotic painkillers.

The sources described a raucous, at times violent culture within the public safety department, with off-duty fights, steroid use and excessive-force incidents that yielded no punishment. […]

“Like anything, you’re going to have a few bad apples,” said [Mayor Brad Stephens], whose father, Rosemont’s founding mayor, Donald E. Stephens Sr., was dogged by allegations of organized-crime ties and repeatedly investigated by federal authorities before his 2007 death.

Lots more there, so click here.

*** UPDATE 1 *** Rosemont spokesperson Ryan McLaughlin…

The FBI has not contacted the Mayor of Rosemont, nor any current Village employees regarding the Monterrey Security contract or the public safety department. The Chicago Sun-Times story is fraught with uncorroborated sources and unsubstantiated charges and includes inaccuracies. They appear to originate from disgruntled former employees of the Village. Rosemont takes any and all allegations of misconduct seriously. The Sun-Times story appears to be nothing more than hearsay.

I asked them to tell me what’s inaccurate about the story.

*** UPDATE 2 *** Gary Mack for Rosemont this time…

The allegations against Rosemont are “all” inaccurate. They are baseless charges founded on hearsay of nameless sources. There is no investigation into Rosemont that we know of or have ever even remotely heard about. As to the culture of the police department, the Sun-Times description is patently wrong. Rosemont’s Police Department is one of best, most professionally run in the state. Indeed, for six months now the department has been getting ready to launch a random drug testing program.

As to the contract with Monterrey, Rosemont did not competitively bid it, true, but anyone who knows the village knows that typically we do not bid contracts. We review credentials and make informed decisions. Rosemont is under absolutely no obligation to bid contracts. The current system has served the village well, making Rosemont the envy of municipal government everywhere.

Rosemont’s attorneys are reviewing the irresponsible Sun-Times story and we are weighing our options.

- Posted by Rich Miller   51 Comments      


*** LIVE COVERAGE ***

Friday, Jul 26, 2019

* Follow along with ScribbleLive


- Posted by Rich Miller   Comments Off      


« NEWER POSTS PREVIOUS POSTS »
* Pritzker implores protesters to "not force a difficult second rebuilding on our small businesses in the course of expressing your very justified pain"
* Reader comments closed for the weekend
* Pritzker thanks Dr. Ezike, extends financial protections, points to progress, says no more daily COVID-19 briefings - Calls Trump tweets "reprehensible" - "I want to send my condolences to the family of George Floyd, and also to every African American in this country" - Defends budget decisions - Credits Illinoisans for progress against virus - No bill signing ceremonies - Hopes testing progress continues - "It seems as if President Trump is withdrawing us from the rest of the world" - No out of state travel plans - Talks contact tracing - Asks Illinoisans to be careful during reopening - Will sign Medicare for undocumented seniors bill - Refuses to criticize Lightfoot for Trump comments - Talks about difficulties in securing testing locations - Dr. Ezike and Pritzker respond to question about what they've learned about themselves and leadership - "We're no longer in a stay at home order"
* 1,622 new cases, 86 additional deaths
* *** UPDATED x1 *** What in the heck is going on in Rockford?
* COVID-19 roundup
* All metro areas reporting record high unemployment rates
* School seclusion and restraint bill derailed after opposition
* Attorney DeVore asks appellate court to dissolve another TRO
* Question of the day
* Madigan issues new guidance to members, staff
* Architects abandon alternative reopening plan
* SUBSCRIBERS ONLY - Supplement to today’s edition
* House of worship attendance limit expected to be removed from stay at home order
* Open thread
* SUBSCRIBERS ONLY - Today's edition of Capitol Fax (use all CAPS in password)
* *** LIVE COVERAGE ***
* Sheriffs file suit against state for refusing to accept jail transfers
* Yesterday's stories

Support CapitolFax.com
Visit our advertisers...

...............

...............

...............

...............

...............

...............

...............


Loading


Main Menu
Home
Illinois
YouTube
Pundit rankings
Obama
Subscriber Content
Durbin
Burris
Blagojevich Trial
Advertising
Updated Posts
Polls

Archives
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004

Blog*Spot Archives
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005

Syndication

RSS Feed 2.0
Comments RSS 2.0
WordPress




Hosted by MCS SUBSCRIBE to Capitol Fax Advertise Here Mobile Version Contact Rich Miller