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React to Pritzker signing criminal justice reform bill

Monday, Feb 22, 2021

* Yes, I know that he hasn’t even signed the bill as this is published, but my inbox is filling up. Posted in the order they were received starting with the IPHA…

Tom Hughes, Executive Director of the Illinois Public Health Association (IPHA), released the following statement on Monday:

“As leaders of local health departments, we serve on the frontlines of defending the public’s safety. It is our responsibility to not only protect communities from threats to their health, but to also address threats to the safety of people’s lives and wellbeing, which includes those lost or hurt by systemic racism. Today, we fully recognize the fact that racism is a public health crisis, and commend Gov. JB Pritzker for taking steps to end this crisis by signing House Bill 3653 into law and reforming the criminal justice system in Illinois.”

“In 2020, we joined communities in mourning the lives lost to systemic racism, including the horrific killing of George Floyd, as well as the murders of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade and countless others. Structural racism has existed in the criminal justice system for far too long, and House Bill 3653 seeks to make significant changes to help ensure the protection of the civil rights of all people and abolish discriminatory law enforcement strategies, which are goals also shared by the IPHA.

“Structural and systemic racism are woven into everyday life for people of color. We have stood with the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus in raising their voices against the injustices that have occurred in the past, and we thank them for developing policies to help prevent acts of racism and violence from happening in the future. As an organization, the IPHA will continue to encourage local health departments to educate the public on ways that structural racism damages lives and communities, and to take an active role in tracking and analyzing data on how racism creates further disparities in health and safety.

“Today marks a historic chapter in advancing our state and improving the physical, mental and emotional health of residents in Illinois. Again, we thank the governor for signing this legislation into law that will help end an epidemic that has threatened and claimed too many lives in our state. We look forward to continue working with the governor, our state legislature and our local community leaders to complete our mission of making a safer and healthier Illinois for all.”

* NRCC

Today Illinois Governor JB Pritzker is set to sign a dangerous bill into law that would end cash bail in Illinois.

Police officers say Illinoisians are “going to see a lot of criminals let loose on the streets.” New York’s experience with cashless bail law is evidence that they’re probably right.

So why have Sean Casten, Lauren Underwood, and Cheri Bustos been silent about a reckless policy that will put their constituents in danger?

Do Sean Casten, Lauren Underwood, and Cheri Bustos support Pritzker’s pro-crime agenda?

* Press release…

Since 2016, the Coalition to End Money Bond and (since 2019) the Illinois Network for Pretrial Justice have been organizing alongside impacted communities, advocates, legislators, and faith leaders to end wealth-based pretrial incarceration. Today, that system will face its demise when Illinois Governor JB Pritzker signs the Pretrial Fairness Act into law. The legislation, written by members of the Coalition and Network, transforms the state’s pretrial justice system by implementing a series of common sense reforms, most notably ending the use of money bail to determine who is released while awaiting trial. A diverse array of organizations from across the state endorsed the historic legislation, including racial justice activists, former law enforcement officials, and advocates against domestic violence and sexual assault. In all, more than 100 community, faith-based, and policy organizations have endorsed the legislation, which will have a dramatic effect on the state’s pretrial system.

The Pretrial Fairness Act is contained in HB 3653, criminal justice omnibus bill championed by the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus. The omnibus bill was developed in response to Black Lives Matter protests that erupted in every corner of Illinois and across the nation last summer. Legislators saw the unprecedented protests as a mandate to bring sweeping changes to the state’s criminal justice system.

“By signing this historic legislation into law, Governor Pritzker and the Illinois legislature have taken a bold step to stand with the millions of people that took to the streets in support of the Black Lives Matter movement. All too often, these calls for desperately needed changes to our criminal justice system have been met with empty rhetoric. By ending money bond, Governor Pritzker and the Illinois legislature are setting an example of what prioritizing racial justice and implementing real criminal justice reform looks like,” said Olivia Butts of Black Lives Matter Bloomington-Normal, a member organization of the Illinois Network for Pretrial Justice.

From Rockford to East St.Louis and everywhere in between, wealth-based incarceration has destabilized communities by caging people not because they pose a danger to the community but because of the size of their bank account. Ninety percent of people incarcerated in Illinois’ 92 county jails are awaiting trial, and a majority of them are caged only because they can’t afford to pay a money bond. This destabilization has made our communities less safe, even while claiming to be done in the name of public safety. The Pretrial Fairness Act will impact tens of thousands of people every year who previously would have been incarcerated while awaiting trial, sometimes for years at a time, due to poverty.

“In 30 seconds, a judge set my money bond at $20,000 and changed the course of my life. I spent 14 months in jail. As a consequence, I lost my business, housing, and I nearly lost custody of my children. When I heard that Governor Pritzker was signing the Pretrial Fairness Act, I began to cry knowing that never again will families in our state experience the pain mine did,” said Lavette Mayes, an advocate with the Illinois Network for Pretrial Justice and the Coalition to End Money Bond.

“The signing of the Pretrial Fairness Act is a victory for people across the state. It shows what is possible when communities organize together to address racism and systemic inequality. People incarcerated pretrial are coerced into accepting plea deals that result in longer prison sentences and even more arrests in the future. By ending money bond, Illinois is not just ending wealth-based pretrial incarceration, we are beginning to meaningfully address mass incarceration,” said Sharone Mitchell, Director of the Illinois Justice Project, a member organization of the Illinois Network for Pretrial Justice and the Coalition to End Money Bond.

* Leader Durkin…

Illinois House Republican Leader Jim Durkin (R-Western Springs) released the following statement on the signing of House Bill 3653 into law:

“The Governor’s support of House Bill 3653 is an insult to our first responders, law enforcement and the law-abiding citizens of Illinois who want to live free of violence and destruction from the criminal element. It’s clear that Governor Pritzker does not understand this bill and what it means to our criminal justice system. Illinois and its citizens will not be safer because of this bill.

We live in a civilized state where our elected officials’ greatest responsibility is the health and safety of Illinois citizens. This past year, Chicago has been traumatized with epic acts of violence through murders and car-jackings with no apparent end in sight. At a crucial time when we should coalesce around the good men and women of law enforcement, Governor Pritzker has turned his back on them with his signature on House Bill 3653.”

* Rep. Mazzochi…

State Representative Deanne Mazzochi (R-Elmhurst) released the following statement in response to the signing of House Bill 3653, an omnibus crime and policing bill:

“Governor Pritzker today is signing HB 3653 at a vacant college campus, and heralding it as a model of reform. It was a bill that could only be passed by squelching debate, the barest of majorities, in the dead of night, in a lame duck session. It was opposed by a bipartisan coalition of DuPage legislators. It also was opposed by the law enforcement agencies and municipalities in my and surrounding districts.

No-one disputes our police should be accountable to the people they protect and serve. But for any bill, you have to ask, who is better off as a result of this bill? Not honest police officers. Not prosecutors and judges who try to keep dangerous people off the street. Not families who live in neighborhoods that need law enforcement to keep them safe.

Governor Pritzker is one of the wealthiest men in the nation. He can afford to hire personal security and insulate himself from the consequences of this legislation. The rest of us are on our own.

In 2018, the General Assembly enacted sweeping bail reform changes so that the rest of Illinois would have to follow Chicago practices. It has not made us safer or better. In DuPage County we experienced the negative impacts of the last “reform”, including increased failures to appear in court; increased carjackings; and home invasions. As just one example, in August, three men terrorized and threatened two families in DuPage. One of those men was wearing an ankle monitor from a previous arrest and was able to participate in these heinous crimes as a result of previously lowering bail standards.

Rather than learn from that, the Democrats in the General Assembly and Governor Pritzker today are doubling down on dysfunction.

It is shameless pandering for political favor within the activist wing of the Democratic party, and comes at the cost of people’s personal safety. This is not acceptable.

Governor Pritzker is failing at Government 101: keeping our residents protected, safe, and secure in their homes and lives.”

I will probably put most legislative responses on the live coverage post, but I wanted to give you a sample here. Also, to my knowledge, the bill’s sponsors do not have bodyguards.

…Adding… ILGOP…

“Governor Pritzker will regret signing HB 3653, an outgrowth of the “defund police” movement. In signing this bill, the Governor is willfully undermining public safety - endangering citizens, emboldening criminals, and making Illinois less safe for families.

Don’t just take it from me. Every police association in this state has condemned this bill.

With the ending of cash bail, HB 3653 mandates the immediate release of persons arrested for burglary, arson, and kidnapping onto our streets while they await trial. The bill legalizes resistance to arrest in many cases and allows anonymous complaints to end a police officer’s career. If a body cam malfunctions or is not turned on properly during an incident, the police officer could now face a class 3 felony and up to five years in jail. Pritzker’s signing of this bill has ensured that police protection in Illinois will become more passive and criminals will become more aggressive.

It’s no surprise that in a recent statewide poll of law enforcement, 66% of police officers will now consider retiring early. Standing firmly behind the thin blue line, Illinois Republicans are appalled at the signing of this bill representing an all out attack on both public safety and the brave men and women who provide it.” - Illinois Republican Party Chairman Don Tracy

This anonymous complaints thing is truly weird to me. If somebody is eventually prosecuted for wrongdoing, who cares how the first tip came in the door? I mean, the police have been soliciting and acting on anonymous tips forever.

* Paul Schimpf…

Today, Senator Paul Schimpf, Republican Candidate for Governor released the following statement in response to Governor Pritzker signing House Bill 3653:

“By signing HB 3653 into law today, JB Pritzker failed the people of Illinois in terms of both policy and leadership. Adamantly opposed by nearly all Illinois law enforcement leaders, HB 3653 makes Illinois communities and families less safe. Even more troubling, the legislation’s passage during an overnight, lame-duck session vote lacked meaningful scrutiny and review. As Governor, I will veto all legislation that fails to comply with minimum levels of transparency.”

* The Illinois Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) State Lodge, FOP Labor Council, FOP Chicago Lodge 7, Illinois Sheriffs’ Association and the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police…

“In signing this bill into law, Governor Pritzker chose to listen to a few strident political voices rather than the 120,000 petition signing citizens who plainly saw the bill for what it is. This new law is a blatant move to punish an entire, honorable profession that will end up hurting law-abiding citizens the most. Because we are sworn to protect and serve the public, we sincerely hope that we will not be proven right about this new law, that it won’t cause police officers to leave the profession in droves and handcuff those who remain so they can’t stop crimes against people and property. Please don’t let us measure its dismal failure by the shattered lives it produces. We urge all citizens to remember who supported this law, and keep that in mind the next time they look to the police in Illinois for the protection they can no longer provide.”

* Alliance for Safety and Justice…

Governor J.B Pritzker today signed a comprehensive public safety reform package – spearheaded by the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus – that prioritize rehabilitation and supports communities most impacted by crime but least served by the current criminal justice system. The legislation’s reforms include improvements to the state’s sentence credit program to reduce recidivism and over-incarceration, as well as a lowering of barriers for crime survivors to access victim services – changes championed by the Alliance for Safety and Justice, with widespread support among crime survivors throughout Illinois. HB 3653 is part of a years-long effort to make communities safer by tackling unaddressed trauma and ending cycles of crime.

“For far too long, the criminal justice system has focused on over-incarceration policies and ignored crime survivors’ public safety priorities – but today, Governor Pritzker has set Illinois on a course towards a safer and more equitable future,” said Aswad Thomas, managing director of the Alliance for Safety and Justice’s flagship program, Crime Survivors for Safety and Justice. “These reforms are critical to addressing trauma and fostering healthier communities, while focusing on rehabilitative approaches that stop cycles of crime. Governor Pritzker, the Legislative Black Caucus, and Attorney General Kwame Raoul deserve immense credit for prioritizing crime victims and public safety with this historic legislation.”

“Thanks to Governor Pritzker and the state legislature, Illinois is making major progress toward rethinking public safety and advancing new approaches to make communities safer,” said Lenore Anderson, President of the Alliance for Safety and Justice. “Through investments in prevention, rehabilitation, and the expansion of victim services, Illinois leaders are supporting communities that have been long neglected by the current system. Improving public safety and public health go hand in hand.”

“I know firsthand about the trauma and pain that comes from losing a loved one, but with today’s bill signing, communities across Illinois will now have the tools to heal and be made safer,” said Bertha Purnell, coordinator of the Chicago chapter for Crime Survivors for Safety and Justice. “Illinois crime survivors supported this bill because we need policies addressing the root causes of crime, as well as expanded victims services for communities left behind by the current system. Thanks to Governor Pritzker, today is a victory for crime survivors and for those who want safer communities for all.”

“Today, Illinois has become a shining example for how we can approach public safety to make our communities safer, fairer, and more just,” said Speaker Pro Tempore Jehan Gordon-Booth. “With the signing of this bill, we’re standing firmly on the side of crime survivors as we commit to addressing trauma and ending cycles of crime. The reforms we’ve enacted will shift our priorities towards prevention and rehabilitation – which has been proven to make communities safer. I’m proud to support this historic legislation alongside Governor Pritzker and the Legislative Black Caucus as we look towards a safer and fairer Illinois.”

* ILBC…

Members of the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus (ILBC) joined Gov. J.B. Pritzker and Lt. Gov. Juliana Stratton Monday to celebrate the signing of House Bill 3653, a historic measure to advance fairness and equity in the criminal justice system, into law.

“These landmark reforms begin a process of building trust through accountability and addressing elements of our criminal justice system that contribute to mass incarceration and the unjust criminalization of people of color,” said state Rep. Sonya Harper, Joint Chair for the ILBC. “These measures begin to build a smarter system where sentencing and bail decisions are based on the safety of the public rather than the wealth and skin color of the defendant, and where bad actors in our police departments are held accountable while those who serve with integrity have the resources they need.”

“These reforms should merely be the first steps we take to transform criminal justice in Illinois,” said state Sen. Elgie Sims, D-Chicago, the chief sponsor of the law in the state senate. “We must reimagine accountability. We must reimagine transparency. We must reimagine incarceration. These reforms are a beginning.”

“This historic moment is the result of a monumental effort on the part of countless people, from those who testified during the 30 hours of public hearings on these issues, to those who have pushed for some of these reforms for years, and especially to the Illinoisans who signaled their support,” Sims said. “I thank them for lifting up their voices and never giving up, and I thank Gov. Pritzker for making these measures the law of the land. The journey continues.”

“HB 3653 is a bold and transformative initiative that comprehensively brings fairness and equity to our criminal justice system,” said state Rep. Justin Slaughter, D-Chicago, who shepherded the measure through the state house. “By effectively addressing police reform, mass incarceration and violence reduction, HB 3653 enhances public safety for all communities.”

“Today is a historic first step toward winning real safety and justice in our communities,” said Black Caucus Senate Chair state Sen. Robert Peters, D-Chicago. “The road to this point has been long and has been filled with difficulties, but after we celebrate today’s victory, we must keep up the fight. The public health, economic and systemic racism crises are still impacting our lives on a daily basis.”

“This is a great day for our community, and it also holds a special place for me personally. Long before I joined the Senate, I was a community organizer, and one of the major issues I fought for was ending money bond,” said Peters. “It’s a bit surreal to be standing here today to see that the fight paid off and money bond will soon be abolished at a state level, and it inspires me to keep up advocating for our communities. At the end of the day this isn’t about me, but all of us, working toward making everyone in this state whole.”

“The signing of HB 3653 is monumental. We built a broad coalition, led by advocates and activists, to push to create real reform. This legislation is a step forward to address generations of systemic inequity. We’ve called this criminal justice reform, but the truth is that we don’t actually have a criminal justice system because we have seen no justice,” said Black Caucus House Chair state Rep. Kam Buckner, D-Chicago. “No justice for victims, no justice for the criminally accused and criminally involved, and no justice for the communities that have been left in the wake. We have a criminal legal system that focuses more on convictions, sentencing and profits than on addressing deficiencies, people and correction. We now have an opportunity to lead the nation by showing what a more just, equitable, transparent and accountable system looks like. It’s time for all of us to turn the corner and push Illinois in the right direction.”

“I was touched when I heard from so many people from every walk of life that enough was enough during the Black Lives Matter movement protests last spring. That spurred me, as chair of the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus, to initiate our four-pillar policy reform process,” said Senate Majority Leader Sen. Kimberly A. Lightford, D-Maywood, who served as Black Caucus chair from January 2015 to January 2021. “I am so proud that we have taken this historic step to rid Illinois of systemic racism. As a Black woman and a mother, I look forward to a day when our children can turn to the police with trust instead of fear, and this law is the first step we need to get there.”

* Illinois Justice Project…

This package of criminal justice reforms is nothing short of historic. Long debated and long necessary, the changes in policing, prosecution and incarceration will make the system more fair and our communities safer.

Many in law enforcement have acknowledged the need for improvements and have embraced change. Yet, some opponents used scare tactics in an attempt to derail the reforms. We commend Gov. Pritzker for rejecting their demagogic and false claims and urge everyone in the system to work together to implement these steps to make our communities safer.

We are especially grateful to the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus, whose members fought so hard for these reforms, listened to all sides and refined the bill for months prior to passage by the General Assembly. Sen. Elgie Sims and Representatives Robert Peters and Justin Slaughter were tenacious in their pursuit of these reforms, especially the abolition of the requirement to pay cash to leave jail before trial.

The end of cash bond – one of the most important reforms – will put meaning into our criminal justice system’s ‘presumption of innocence.’ When effective in two years, judges will be able to detain anyone determined to be a threat to the community or unlikely to return for a court date, but no one else will be required to come up with cash to buy their release from jail prior to a trial.

The dozens of organizations and individuals making up the Coalition to End Money Bond are indicative of the large number of supporters, which includes two of the state’s leading prosecutors – Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx and Lake County State’s Attorney Eric F. Rinehart.

* John Howard Association…

JHA is thrilled that the Governor signed House Bill (HB) 3653, omnibus criminal justice reform legislation, now known as the SAFE-T Act (Safety Accountability Fairness Equity Today) into law. There is more work to be done, but with the enactment of this law, Illinois takes an important step towards achieving a better system for our state — one that prioritizes equity and fairness along with public safety and smart resource allocation.

JHA is Illinois’ only independent citizen correctional oversight organization. Our work and mission are focused on increasing the transparency of our criminal justice system and shining a light on problems and unfairness in order to address issues and hold systems accountable. It is in identifying what we are doing wrong, exposing it, and advancing reforms to rectify these wrongs that we can begin to have a system that recognizes and respects the dignity and humanity of all people.

This legislation, in pieces, has been a long time in coming. Some key reforms ushered in by the SAFE-T Act include:

    Eliminating a wealth-based system of bail that penalizes the poor without improving public safety or justice system outcomes
    Reforming how police are trained, should behave on the job, and held accountable to performing their responsibilities with honesty and fairness
    Recognizing the need to increase publicly available information about the men and women who die while in the custody of criminal justice agencies without loved ones available
    Reducing unnecessary restrictions of liberty imposed upon criminal justice-involved people

These are not new ideas, conversations, or even legislative proposals in Illinois. It has taken years to recognize and respond to the urgent needs of people impacted by our criminal justice system that have too long been discussed but not addressed.

Improved systems of policing, criminal legal processes, and correctional outcomes help our communities and make better use of limited resources and taxpayer funds.

JHA believes that HB 3653 will lead to important system improvements. Included in the SAFE-T Act are two specific provisions that we championed: the modernization of the Mandatory Supervised Release (MSR) statute and the establishment of the Death in Custody Reporting Act (DCRA).

* Speaker Welch…

“For too long, systemic racism has plagued our criminal justice system. In fact, it has been used to perpetuate a system of injustice. Today, I am proud to say that our state is taking steps to end that. I applaud Governor Pritzker for swiftly signing this bill into law; and I especially applaud my colleagues in the General Assembly who have been working towards this for years. Being Black or Brown in America is not a crime. Being poor in America is not crime. Today our laws will reflect that a bit more. But there’s certainly more to do.”

* Restore Justice…

Thank you, Governor JB Pritzker and members of the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus. This afternoon, Governor Pritzker signed House Bill 3653, Senate Amendment 2 into law.

This extensive, multi-faceted legislation will address some of the most devastating, racially unjust practices that plague Illinois communities. It will end wealth-based pretrial incarceration, improve Illinois’s sentencing laws, ensure police officers wear body cameras, require the Illinois Department of Corrections to provide information about deaths in custody, and end prison gerrymandering, among other much-needed changes. Here’s a summary of the omnibus legislation.

Restore Justice is particularly grateful legislators included felony-murder reform in this bill. Read our testimony about the felony-murder law. Until this newly passed proposal takes effect, Illinois has one of the broadest felony murder-statutes in the country. This law incarcerates children and young adults for murders they didn’t commit. It doesn’t make us safer, but it does rob these young people of their futures and their families and communities of their voices. The majority of states either don’t have felony-murder statutes or only hold people accountable for deaths they or their co-defendants cause. HB 3653, SA 2 will move Illinois into that category.

It’s long past time to make Illinois’s laws fairer and to acknowledge the role racism plays at every stage of the criminal legal system. Passing this omnibus bill and fixing the felony-murder statute are important steps in advancing justice in our state.

Lawmakers held more than 30 hearings about this bill and have been discussing the provisions for years. Committee leaders invited all stakeholders to the table for these conversations. The Illinois Legislative Black Caucus crafted the bill and included proposals that have been debated and made progress in previous sessions. Thank you to the entire Legislative Black Caucus, especially Illinois Senate Criminal Law Committee Chairman Elgie Sims (D-Chicago), Senator Robert Peters (D-Chicago), and Representative Justin Slaughter (D-Chicago). Thank you for leading the way to make Illinois a better state.

…Adding… Gov. Pritzker…

Building on efforts to create a more equitable and safe criminal justice system, Governor JB Pritzker signed landmark legislation that transforms Illinois’ criminal justice system. This landmark legislation ends a pretrial detention system that benefits the wealthy, expands training and wellness programs for law enforcement, modernizes sentencing laws, and prioritizes treatment and rehabilitation for low-level drug crimes.

“This legislation marks a substantial step toward dismantling the systemic racism that plagues our communities, our state and our nation and brings us closer to true safety, true fairness and true justice,” said Governor JB Pritzker. “In this terrible year, in the middle of a brutal viral pandemic that hurt Black people and Brown people disproportionately, lawmakers fought to address the pandemic of systemic racism in the wake of national protests. This bill was also infused with solutions from individuals most directly impacted: survivors of domestic violence, survivors of crime, and those who have been detained pre-trial only because they are poor. Today we advance our values in the law – progress secured despite the pandemic, because of the passion and push of the Legislative Black Caucus, activists, advocates, and residents intent on leaving a better Illinois for all our children.”

“Black History is about monumental moments and movements that serve as catalysts for change. Today, with the signing of HB 3653, it is both,” said Lieutenant Governor Juliana Stratton. “I have a tremendous amount of gratitude for Governor Pritzker and members of the Illinois Black Caucus. They used their seats of power to effectuate change that will alter the trajectory of lives, families, and entire communities for generations to come.”

House Bill 3653 expands safety, fairness, and justice by transforming the state’s criminal justice system and enacting statewide police reforms through the following:

    • Moves Illinois from a system of pretrial detention that prioritizes wealth, to one that prioritizes public safety.
    • Diverts low-level drug crimes into substance use programs and treatments.
    • Modernizes sentencing laws and streamlines the victims’ compensation system.
    • Requires more investments in officer training, mental health, and officer wellness.
    • Expands training opportunities for officers, requires health and wellness services for officers, and protects officers from unjust lawsuits based on their reasonable actions.
    • Sets statewide standards on use of force, crowd control responses, de-escalation, and arrest techniques.
    • Requires the use of body-worn cameras by police departments statewide.
    • Professionalizes policing through the creation of a more robust certification system and lays out clear standards and processes for decertification.
    • Expands accountability across police departments by requiring the permanent retention of police misconduct records and removes the sworn affidavit requirement when filing police misconduct complaints.
    • Requires police departments to develop plans to protect vulnerable people present during search warrant raids.
    • Eliminates license suspensions for unpaid fines and fees due to red light camera and traffic offenses.
    • Ends prison gerrymandering.
    • Expands services for crime victims.

“These reforms should merely be the first steps we take to transform criminal justice in Illinois,” said State Senator Elgie Sims. “We must reimagine accountability. We must reimagine transparency. We must reimagine incarceration. These reforms are a beginning. This historic moment is the result of a monumental effort on the part of countless people, from those who testified during the 30 hours of public hearings on these issues, to those who have pushed for some of these reforms for years, and especially to the Illinoisans who signaled their support. I thank them for lifting up their voices and never giving up, and I thank Gov. Pritzker for making these measures the law of the land. The journey continues.”

“HB 3653 is a bold and transformative initiative that comprehensively brings fairness and equity to our criminal justice system,” said State Representative Justin Slaughter. “By effectively addressing police reform, mass incarceration, and violence reduction, HB 3653 will enhance public safety for all communities. The time is now to go from protest to progress.”

“As a former community organizer, I fought side by side with the Coalition to End Money Bond,” said State Senator Robert Peters. “Today, to see that the fight paid off and that money bond will soon be abolished at the state level inspires me to continue fighting for our communities. Together we must continue to work toward making everyone in this state whole.”

“The historical inequities of our criminal justice system do not just disappear with the passage of time; that takes effort and courage,” said Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle. “Today I thank the Governor and our legislators for their effort and courage, doing what it takes us to lead us into a brighter future. For a decade now we’ve worked to reduce our reliance on the antiquated system of cash bail in Cook County; and our efforts have shown that we have been able to do so safely. This work, coupled with the decades of advocacy and expertise from throughout the state and from the communities most affected by crime, have informed this brave and just piece of legislation.”

“The Network: Advocating Against Domestic Violence commends Governor Pritzker on signing into law HB 3653,” said Amanda Pyron, Executive Director of The Network: Advocating Against Domestic Violence. “This bill provides for detention hearings for those accused of domestic and sexual violence, while ensuring those accused of non-violent crimes are not punished for being poor. Survivors will have notice of hearings and the opportunity to obtain orders of protection in the pre-trial phase. The Network applauds Governor Pritzker and the Legislative Black Caucus for protecting survivors and advancing racial equity through criminal justice reform. Justice for survivors cannot be achieved without racial and economic justice.”

HB 3653 was the result of years of work by community advocates, lawmakers, and members of law enforcement. The legislation was an initiative of the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus and the culmination of nine public hearings, 30 hours of testimony, and countless meetings with law enforcement, community members, and advocates.

HB 3653 is effective July 1, 2021, except for certain provisions that are effective either January 1, 2022 (use of force changes), January 1, 2023 (Pretrial Fairness Act), and January 1, 2025 (prison gerrymandering).

* AG Raoul…

Attorney General Kwame Raoul today applauded Governor JB Pritzker for signing into law criminal justice reform legislation that includes Raoul’s initiative to improve the police certification and decertification process. The measure is part of Attorney General Raoul’s ongoing work to advocate for policies that make lasting, systemic change to policing in Illinois. The new law also includes Raoul’s proposals to allow the Attorney General’s office to conduct pattern-and-practice investigations of civil rights violations by law enforcement and improve services for survivors of crimes.

“By signing this law, Governor Pritzker puts Illinois firmly on the path toward improved services for crime victims, comprehensive criminal justice reform and constitutional policing,” Raoul said. “I am proud of the continued work and collaboration between my office, law enforcement, advocates and legislators to enact meaningful new laws that will not only promote professionalism, increase transparency and restore the public’s trust in law enforcement, but also enhance services available to victims of crime. While today is a significant step forward, lasting reform is a constant work in progress, and I am committed to continuing to work alongside our partners in law enforcement to improve policing in communities across Illinois.”

“This legislation marks a substantial step toward dismantling the systemic racism that plagues our communities, our state and our nation and brings us closer to true safety, true fairness and true justice,” said Governor JB Pritzker. “In this terrible year, in the middle of a brutal viral pandemic that hurt Black people and Brown people disproportionately, lawmakers fought to address the pandemic of systemic racism in the wake of national protests. This bill was also infused with solutions from individuals most directly impacted: survivors of domestic violence, survivors of crime, and those who have been detained pre-trial only because they are poor. Today we advance our values in the law – progress secured despite the pandemic, because of the passion and push of the Legislative Black Caucus, activists, advocates, and residents intent on leaving a better Illinois for all our children.”
House Bill 3653 was sponsored by Sen. Elgie Sims and Rep. Justin Slaughter and includes Raoul’s proposal for improving the police certification and decertification process that focuses on three key areas for reform: creating uniformity for officers and departments across the state, promoting professionalism in law enforcement, and increasing transparency.

Before this new law, the ways in which law enforcement and state’s attorneys investigate and take action in response to officer misconduct varied from department to department. Additionally, the Illinois Law Enforcement Training and Standards Board (ILETSB) could decertify an officer only in the event of a felony conviction and a limited list of misdemeanors. Raoul’s measure will improve the police certification and decertification process in Illinois by creating uniformity during the review process to allow for investigations of serious officer misconduct that may not automatically lead to decertification but still warrants a review of the officer’s actions. The law also promotes professionalism by creating a mandatory reporting system to ensure officers are in compliance with state professionalism standards. Additionally, Raoul’s measure will increase transparency by improving information sharing between hiring departments, departments and prosecutors, and the ILETSB and the public.

Attorney General Raoul’s proposal to give the Illinois Attorney General’s office clear authority under state law to investigate and resolve patterns or practices of unconstitutional policing by local and state agencies also was included in the legislation and signed into law today. Raoul previously led discussions with Congressional leadership to ensure federal law gives state attorneys general authority to conduct investigations into patterns or practices of unconstitutional policing. The George Floyd Justice in Policing Act of 2020 was amended as a result, and the legislation was passed last year by the U.S. House of Representatives – but not by the U.S. Senate. The law signed today codifies the Illinois Attorney General’s authority to conduct such investigations in state law.

Additionally, Governor Pritzker signed into law Raoul’s improvements to the state’s Crime Victim Compensation Program that would enable the Attorney General’s office to more efficiently administer benefits in order to make resources more accessible to survivors. Modernizing the program not only will allow the Attorney General’s office to better meet crime victims’ immediate needs but also will contribute to breaking the cycle of community violence.

The Attorney General’s Civil Rights Bureau enforces state and federal civil rights laws to prohibit discrimination in Illinois, and advocates for legislation to strengthen those laws. Raoul encourages people who need to file a complaint to do so online or by calling the Civil Rights Hotline at 1-877-581-3692.

Attorney General Raoul encourages individuals who have been impacted by a violent crime to call his office’s Crime Victims Assistance Line at 1-800-228-3368 or visit the Attorney General’s website.

* Sen. John Curran on behalf of the SGOP caucus…

On Monday, Governor JB Pritzker signed House Bill 3653 into law. The 700+ page legislation makes sweeping changes to Illinois’ criminal justice system, and the bill was opposed by nearly every law enforcement organization in the state. In response to the signing of the legislation, Illinois State Senator John Curran (R-Downers Grove) issued the following statement:

“Gov. Pritzker has enacted this hyper-partisan legislation against the strong objections of nearly every law enforcement organization in the state, and against the great concern of the general public.

“This 700-plus page proposal was rammed through in the middle of the night with just hours left in a Lame Duck session without the transparency and discourse expected in a democratic process.

“There are some positives in this legislation – specifically the changes that make it easier to reprimand and de-certify bad actors in law enforcement who have broken the public’s trust. Unfortunately, the negatives, which could have been further negotiated had the sponsors been open to bipartisan support, will undoubtedly make our communities less safe.

“Since House Bill 3653 passed, Senate Republicans have hosted about 30 virtual town halls with our local law enforcement groups in an attempt to better understand how these provisions will negatively affect their departments and our communities. We will be addressing some of their biggest concerns through legislation to be introduced this session to help ensure Illinois communities are safe for all.”

* Press release…

Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart said Monday he was proud to participate in the enactment of a law adding new criminal justice protections including the end of cash bail, a mandate for police body cameras and increased police training.

The SAFE-T Act, which includes the Pretrial Fairness Act, was signed into law Monday by Gov. J.B. Pritzker.

“While we are finally ending the injustice of dangerous people buying their freedom, we are also codifying what each of us know to be true — no one should be in jail simply because they are poor,” State’s Attorney Rinehart said.

He joined several other officials, including Attorney General Kwame Raoul, in explaining the importance of the new law in establishing both equality and increased safety.

“Unjustly jailing those who pose no risk to the community creates a ripple effect, perpetuating cycles of poverty and crime,” Rinehart said, thanking the governor, as well as other leaders and legislators, who championed the reform bill.

“Thank you to the General Assembly for boldly proclaiming that the criminal justice system must do more to protect all people,” he said.

State’s Attorney Rinehart said reforms in the bill will better protect victims from their abusers, “because judges can end the turn-style that releases those who would use their wealth to evade jail.”

“For this reason, the most pre-eminent victims’ advocate groups support this reform,” he said. “The most accomplished and passionate advocates for victims support this bill”

The State’s Attorney said that instead of turning questions of liberty and justice “into ones of dollars and cents,” judges will have to clearly state why they believe someone should be held or released.

“This transparency will take us inside a judge’s reasoning, and is critical in a system that has failed to live up to the ideal of “’equal justice for all,’” he said

“Good and principled people now have the tools they need to fight systemic discrimination, to bring transparency and accountability to policing, and to ensure that justice is determined by the merit of the matter, and not race, gender, access to money,” Rinehart said.

* Treatment Alternatives for Safe Communities…

“With Governor JB Pritzker’s signature on House Bill 3653, Illinois has taken real steps to further safety, justice, and behavior health interests for all communities across the state.

The TASC Center for Health & Justice’s recommendations to the State’s deflection statute, incorporated in the new law, move deflection toward a broader public health and prevention design, encouraging implementation consistent with emerging best practices, and supporting development and implementation in marginalized communities.

The new law connects substance use programs with first responder duties by expanding the definition of “deflection” to also make non-law enforcement first responders—EMS and fire departments—eligible to lead deflection programs and apply for state grant money. The law also explicitly acknowledges co-responder approaches that incorporate behavioral health professionals, social workers, or peers at the scene and in follow-up care.

Moreover, an end to the State’s wealth-based incarceration through the elimination of cash bail and an end to prison gerrymandering that counts people in prison at their prison residences (rather than legal home residences) for purposes of redistricting are fundamental, needed, and transformational changes.”

- Posted by Rich Miller        

61 Comments »
  1. - Equity - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 12:07 pm:

    The responses grounded in opposition are baffling and very short sighted. There’s consensus and polled support across the board on the need for many of these reforms.

    I can’t wait to see how the people who oppose this today defend what they’re saying 5/10 years from now.


  2. - Elliot Ness - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 12:08 pm:

    Rumor is the Police were asked to the table for input and negotiation regarding this and FOP refused


  3. - Moe Berg - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 12:10 pm:

    All the GOP has to offer is fear.

    “Pro-crime agenda” according to the NRCC.

    Ludicrous. Only makes sense in the fever swamps of the right.


  4. - Collinsville Kevin - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 12:14 pm:

    Republican sources have nothing to add but the same old tired platitudes. Talk about a party that has zero ideas.


  5. - btowntruthfromforgottonia - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 12:16 pm:

    “pro-crime agenda”.
    Going to guess they didn’t even bother to see what was in the bill and just went with the fear and hate.


  6. - ChuckIL - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 12:17 pm:

    Against all odds, Western Springs and Elmhurst will persevere. 🙄


  7. - Not a Superstar - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 12:29 pm:

    Kind of surprised Mazzochi referred to the “Democratic party,” not “Democrat party.” Because everything else in her release comes from the Eastern Bloc playbook.


  8. - Jocko - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 12:34 pm:

    ==But for any bill, you have to ask, who is better off as a result of this bill?==

    Someone needs to tell Deanne her white privilege is showing. At least she didn’t blame ‘those people’ for the carjackings and home invasions. /S


  9. - DuPage Saint - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 12:53 pm:

    Bail was never intended as a punishment it was meant to insure a defendant returned to court for the case. I do not understand that people are charged with a crime not convicted of a crime when bail set. So if a person is not a danger and not a flight risk he should be released. I also realize that in DuPage County you would not be arrested if you were not guilty of the charge or some other crime you got away with so of course in DuPage you should stay locked up /S


  10. - Kayak - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 1:24 pm:

    If no cash bail means means no detainment and more crimes committed, then we’d better see at least a threefold increase in arrests. If not the police are not clearly not doing their jobs.


  11. - DuPage - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 1:32 pm:

    A realtor told me the real estate market in DuPage county is booming right now. A lot of people who live in Chicago have decided they don’t want to stay there because of rising violent crime, (armed carjackers released and resume carjacking in a few days).


  12. - Holding Back - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 1:35 pm:

    Again, who will end up paying to keep the lights on in the courthouse. I guess it will be the people who follow the law.


  13. - Bobby G. - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 1:36 pm:

    The concerning criticism rests on the issue of whether the Bill violated the Constitutional requirement that laws comply with the “single subject rule.” In the late 90’s, the Safe Neighborhoods Act was struck down as violating that provision in People v. Cervantes (1999). Later, in Wirtz v. Quinn (2011), the Illinois Supreme Court backed off on the single subject rule. I anticipate we will see if this bill is more like Cervantes or Wirtz. Since many of the Bill’s provisions do not take effect for another 2 years, maybe the GA can pass its components separately and avoid a single-subject challenge.


  14. - DuPage - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 1:37 pm:

    @- Kayak - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 1:24 pm:

    ===If no cash bail means means no detainment and more crimes committed, then we’d better see at least a threefold increase in arrests. If not the police are not clearly not doing their jobs.===

    Chicago police are shorthanded and can’t even keep up with retirements. This results in mandatory overtime which eats up money to hire more police.


  15. - The Doc - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 1:39 pm:

    ==Again, who will end up paying to keep the lights on in the courthouse. I guess it will be the people who follow the law==

    What does this even mean?


  16. - Huh? - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 1:42 pm:

    “who will end up paying to keep the lights on in the courthouse”

    County property taxes.


  17. - SWIL_Voter - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 1:45 pm:

    ==Again, who will end up paying to keep the lights on in the courthouse. I guess it will be the people who follow the law==

    Perhaps unintentionally revealing


  18. - Oswego Willy - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 1:48 pm:

    === What does this even mean?===

    It’s gibberish. They have no context to the bill.

    To the post,

    The reaction to the signing, my take is this;

    If the Raunerites and law enforcement can make the argument to the merits of what they see as failing without this undercurrent of monetary challenges to bail, for one, or the underpinnings of race and welcoming racist thinking to be a crutch, then they have a real chance to make political hay.

    Once race and wealth are placed in the discussion AND the idea that fair and equal will suffer… and they are cool, allegedly cool, with that, Pritzker, et al., will run over those willing to embrace the two ways (wealth and race) to justice is acceptable… yikes.

    That’s the sweet spot for both.

    Will either make the silly mistakes to undercut the paths?


  19. - Lincoln Lad - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 1:51 pm:

    Doesn’t take much to see the dog whistles in the GOP mouths on this one.


  20. - TheInvisibleMan - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 1:56 pm:

    Rich, the IL Sheriff’s Association seems to have lost their mind and has posted one of the most bizarre infographics on their social media accounts.


  21. - Commisar Gritty - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:02 pm:

    ILFOP: The Governor chose to listen to a few political voices instead of the 120,000 Illinoisans (and most of them probably weren’t bots / dummy accounts we set up) that signed our petition. Because we have pushed to defund education for so long, it is our firm belief tjat 120,000 is a majority of the 12.7 million people that live in this state.


  22. - Suburbs - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:03 pm:

    It will be interesting to watch which suburban Dems who voted for this mess lose their seats because of it. Not many votes matter that much at election time but this will in a few districts. Then maybe some of this bad policy will be corrected. Durkin is upset about the policy but the politics will not play out well for a few suburban Dems.


  23. - Rich Miller - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:11 pm:

    ===which suburban Dems who voted for this mess lose their seats because of it===

    60 House votes on a structured roll call. Targets off. https://ilga.gov/legislation/votehistory/101/house/10100HB3653sam002_01132021_002000C.pdf


  24. - Roman - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:13 pm:

    Lots of sound and fury around this bill, most of it exaggerated.

    Here’s the political question: is this just red meat that the GOP is throwing to their base, or will a suburban Dem or two run into trouble for voting “yes?” My bet is it’s the former, at least for now. Once bond reform goes into effect, the latter becomes more of a possibility. It’s inevitable that someone released without bail will go out and commit more crime. That could be weaponized. But bond reform is still two years away.


  25. - Oswego Willy - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:16 pm:

    === 60 House votes on a structured roll call. Targets off.===

    Goes back to Welch, process, and part of the process is just that;

    Finding 60, saving targets, and only putting it to a vote “when ripe”

    Running the chambers isn’t as easy as people think, not all bills are the same to process.


  26. - Fav Human - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:21 pm:

    will a suburban Dem or two run into trouble for voting “yes

    Well, it depends. The Info graphic referred to above has this:

    “unknown person in your yard. The police are called but the person refuses to leave. The person can not be arrested. A ticket will be issued”

    Now, IF this bill had been debated in the light of day, this sort of thing could have been debated and either:

    debunked

    OR

    Language tweaked to make sure it didnt happen.


  27. - dan l - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:25 pm:

    //
    ILFOP: The Governor chose to listen to a few political voices instead of the 120,000 Illinoisans (and most of them probably weren’t bots / dummy accounts we set up) that signed our petition. Because we have pushed to defund education for so long, it is our firm belief tjat 120,000 is a majority of the 12.7 million people that live in this state.
    //

    Deserves comment of the day.


  28. - west wing - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:28 pm:

    All the post 2020 polling and analyses pointed to the defund the police issue as costing House and Senate Dems enormously in races across the country. That’s why, of course, the IL GOP is salivating over using this bill and issue from now until Nov 2022. You can go to the bank on it.


  29. - Oswego Willy - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:31 pm:

    ===IL GOP is salivating over using this bill and issue from now until Nov 2022. You can go to the bank on it.===

    Until they can prove they can recruit better and not be beholden to Trump’s racist, insurrection and conspiracy thinking, and seem thoughtful to each district… it won’t matter.

    They also need cash.

    The gubernatorial nominee will be huge to the thinking even in the districts to this bill.


  30. - Rich Miller - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:31 pm:

    ===Now, IF this bill had been debated in the light of day===

    Plenty of hearings.


  31. - Rich Miller - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:33 pm:

    ===Now, IF this bill had been debated in the light of day===

    They debated the cannabis bill endlessly and it didn’t stop the lies.


  32. - SWIL_Voter - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:34 pm:

    == All the post 2020 polling and analyses pointed to the defund the police issue as costing House and Senate Dems enormously in races across the country==

    No it didn’t


  33. - Rich Miller - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:36 pm:

    ===Now, IF this bill had been debated in the light of day===

    If debate did what you claim, the covid-denying sheriffs wouldn’t be covid-deniers.


  34. - Watcher of the Skies - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:37 pm:

    Highlighting one of the least offensive parts of Mazzochi’s sad statement:

    “no-one”

    What? Excuse me? Who does that?


  35. - Holding Back - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:37 pm:

    It was intentional. There will be diminished funding to counties and state agencies. This puts the burden backs on the taxpayers.


  36. - Holding Back - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:39 pm:

    It was intentional. There will be diminished funding to counties and state agencies. This puts the burden backs on the backs of taxpayers. Please excuse the previous grammar mistake.


  37. - Oswego Willy - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:41 pm:

    === This puts the burden backs on the backs of taxpayers.===

    Who’s not a taxpayer?

    LOL

    My goodness gracious.


  38. - Rich Miller - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:44 pm:

    === sheriffs wouldn’t be covid-deniers===

    President of the Illinois Sheriffs’ Assn. hasn’t ever enforced mitigations https://www.shawlocal.com/2020/10/02/ogle-sheriff-state-police-could-enforce-mitigation-rules/afom5ox/


  39. - SWIL_Voter - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:44 pm:

    == It was intentional.==

    I’m at least glad you’re up front about the perverse incentive of needing to lock up the presumed innocent as a money making venture.


  40. - Holding Back - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:47 pm:

    More specifically. Property taxes


  41. - Oswego Willy - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 2:49 pm:

    === More specifically. Property taxes===

    So only property owners should have equality under the law?

    That’s an odd take.

    Don’t renters also pay rent, assisting in the property taxes? Who rents out property and not have in the equation… property taxes.


  42. - Roman - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 3:10 pm:

    == Targets off ==

    Not all. A handful might be exposed a bit, including a few downstaters. And allow me to emphasize “might.” I’m not convinced this is going to create the electoral jackpot the GOP is hoping for, at least not until the no-cash bail provisions take affect.


  43. - Confusion - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 3:14 pm:

    ===Until they can prove they can recruit better and not be beholden to Trump’s racist, insurrection and conspiracy thinking, and seem thoughtful to each district… it won’t matter.===

    It depends on whether or not there is a major uptick in crime and Republicans can make it an issue, especially in the suburbs and collar counties. People have really short memories when they are “traumatized” and seek safety.

    Will there be a major uptick in crime? I don’t know. However, there is a precipitous drop in violent crime arrest statistics nationwide that coincides with the passage of the crime bill, state-level mandatory sentencing laws, etc. If I recall correctly, Milton Friedman found a 0.5% increase in enforcement correlated to a 2% reduction in crime. It’s a very blunt metric for a nuanced problem because correlation does not equal causation in statistics. However, I can already see the infographics and memes if the rates go up.

    Also, cash bail was never intended as revenue. If you are arguing about lost revenue, you are missing the point. It was insurance that people would show-up for court in a time when you could easily change your name and move away like in the wild wild west. If you are arrested, you are printed and booked. They can come find you if needed. The determination to release those arrested should be based on the threat to public safety and should be used very sparingly.


  44. - Simply anon - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 3:19 pm:

    The new law permits pretrial detention where “the defendant poses a specific, real and present threat to a person.” Gone are the limitations on which crimes are subject to potential detention. While this seems logical to me, I don’t understand how it squares withe Illinois Constitution (all persons are bailable, except certain offenses) or IL Supreme Court caselaw that does not permit preventative detention?


  45. - Grandson of Man - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 3:19 pm:

    “the “defund police” movement”

    The ILGOP opposed impeaching the former president over the insurrection. The “law and order” talking point is finished. The GOP itself, by acquitting the former president, provides a great example of why we need criminal justice reform.


  46. - Battle of Evermore - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 4:02 pm:

    Why don’t legislators wear body cams?

    Gov Pritzker? Jail guards?

    Aren’t folks being injured by them too?


  47. - Frank talks - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 4:06 pm:

    Dems voted for police reforms that the GOP says hurts cops.
    GOP takes money, support and stands with Trump while those supporters kill cops?
    Dems vote for strong pensions and protecting retirement for union workers.
    GOP wants to strip pensions through constitutional amendments, won’t increase peoples paychecks, including teachers, and thinks living wage is a ridiculous phrase.

    How many Dems got hurt in last election over the RHA vote that everyone said would crush the Democrat suburbanites who voted for it?

    One issue does not a campaign make.


  48. - Oswego Willy - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 4:17 pm:

    === Why don’t legislators wear body cams?===

    Mr. Cabello, is that you?

    How’s things?


  49. - Simply anon - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 4:29 pm:

    Frank talks - you can make the same point without reference to the (apparently) false assertion that Trump supporters killed police. I assume you mean the Capitol Police officer who died at some point after the riot? NY Times and others walked back the story that he was hit by rioters.


  50. - Oswego Willy - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 4:31 pm:

    === false assertion that Trump supporters killed police===

    “We love you”

    - Trump about the rioters.

    Enough with the revisionist history.


  51. - DuPage - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 5:00 pm:

    @- Confusion - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 3:14 pm:

    ===If you are arrested, you are printed and booked. They can come find you if needed.===

    In Cook County, not so much. They are having a hard time finding hundreds of prisoners who were wearing ankle monitors and then went out to commit more armed robberies, carjacking, home invasion, and other violent crimes.


  52. - Views - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 5:03 pm:

    In 2018 there were R’s on bail reform. This time there weren’t. The DuPage home invasion was in TCH’s district, I think, so not surprising she was no on this bill. Swing suburban moms may like abortion and ending racism, but that doesn’t mean they want more crime in their neighborhoods.


  53. - Chicagonk - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 5:11 pm:

    My view on this is that I hope it slowly starts to build back POCs trust in the criminal justice system. Will that come at the expense of public safety? It might. I think that is a risk that is worth taking, and I hope if changes need to be made, that changes can be made.


  54. - Quincy - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 5:47 pm:

    No Cops in Illinois 2025. Thanks Gov


  55. - Quincy - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 5:52 pm:

    No Cops by 2025 Take away his body guards then lets see what the gov thinks about this new law


  56. - Oswego Willy - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 5:55 pm:

    === No Cops in Illinois 2025.===

    If you believe this, you have bigger worries than no cops.

    So no changed, you think that’s the way to go?

    I’d say things weren’t great before.


  57. - Candy Dogood - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 6:38 pm:

    ===If you believe this, you have bigger worries than no cops.===

    Perhaps Quincy means to say we’ll be referring to them as peace officers of something similar to avoid utilizing the word “cop” which has it’s origins as an unpleasant term, or at the very least only describes a small portion of what our police forces should be doing.


  58. - Anonymous - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 8:54 pm:

    Don’t you find it strange that the cash bail feature of this bill doesn’t go in affect until 2023. Year after the election. Wouldn’t do it this year as we would have time to see the result.


  59. - Elmer Keith - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 9:10 pm:

    “…Attorney General Raoul’s ongoing work to advocate for policies that make lasting, systemic change to policing in Illinois.” Lies. Raoul sponsored his SB 1304 Body Cam bill in 2015, when he was chairman of Senate judiciary, and he did not put criminal penalties in the bill for police who delete or alter videos.

    In 2013 Raoul did nothing in the Senate about the Duty to Inform that NRA lobbyist Todd Vandermyde placed in Brandon Phelps’ concealed carry bill, which cost armed citizen Philando Castile his life in Minnesota. In the house, Duty to Inform was opposed on the record by LaShawn Ford, Chris Welch, and especially Will Davis. Raoul is a phoney.


  60. - Frank talks - Monday, Feb 22, 21 @ 9:14 pm:

    @Anonymous nice tinfoil hat you brought for happy hour.

    @Quincy- no cops by 2025? So people won’t take a good job, with good benefits, great salary and a nice pension because they’ll have to be accountable for their ability to have a job where they could kill people? Interesting take.


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    how to use cbd dropper


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