Capitol Fax.com - Your Illinois News Radar » Kia and Hyundai really need to fix this problem now
SUBSCRIBE to Capitol Fax      Advertise Here      About     Exclusive Subscriber Content     Updated Posts    Contact Rich Miller
CapitolFax.com
To subscribe to Capitol Fax, click here.
Kia and Hyundai really need to fix this problem now

Tuesday, Mar 21, 2023 - Posted by Rich Miller

* So, according to this, the equivalent of 10 percent of all registered Kias and 7 percent of all registered Hyundais in Chicago were stolen last year? I knew the problem was bad, but whoa…

Attorney General Kwame Raoul, as part of a coalition of 22 attorneys general, today called on Kia America (Kia) and Hyundai Motor Company (Hyundai) to take swift and comprehensive action to help remedy the crisis of car thefts that has occurred as a result of the companies’ failure to equip vehicles with anti-theft immobilizers.

From approximately 2010 to 2021, Hyundai and Kia failed to equip base vehicle models with anti-theft immobilizers, which prevent the vehicle from operating without a key or key fob. In 2022 alone, there were over 7,000 Hyundai and Kia thefts in Chicago, which account for 10% of all registered Kia vehicles and 7% of all registered Hyundai vehicles in the city.

Kia and Hyundai recently announced a customer service campaign to upgrade the software of affected vehicles; however, Raoul and the coalition said in a letter that the plan is insufficient, incomplete and long overdue.

“I urge Kia and Hyundai to accelerate a software upgrade to ensure consumers’ vehicles are properly equipped to guard against theft. Additionally, these companies need to provide free alternate protective measures to owners with vehicles that cannot support the software upgrade,” Raoul said. “I stand committed to protecting consumers and our communities, and I urge these car companies to do their part to prevent these thefts.”

Raoul and the attorneys general explain that Kia and Hyundai chose not to include anti-theft immobilizers as standard equipment on several vehicle models sold in the United States, despite including the immobilizers on the same affected models sold in other countries. As a result, the number of thefts and the use of stolen vehicles to commit other thefts in the U.S. significantly increased.

Raoul and the attorneys general are urging the companies to accelerate the planned software upgrade because in addition to dealing with the risk of their vehicle being stolen, Hyundai and Kia owners now face the threat of being unable to insure their vehicles. According to the coalition, several major insurance companies are now refusing to insure the Hyundai and Kia models most susceptible to theft.

Joining Attorney General Raoul in submitting the letter were the attorneys general of Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maryland, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, Washington and Wisconsin, along with the Utah Division of Consumer Protection.

* From the letter

In 2020 there were 895 thefts of Hyundai and Kia vehicles in Milwaukee. In 2021, there were 6,970

Holy moly.

       

42 Comments
  1. - DuPage - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 9:59 am:

    Someone put a step-by-step procedure to steal those models on social media.


  2. - Franklin - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:00 am:

    HB 1527 would ban the use of “disablement technology” on every vehicle. Supported by the Cook County Sheriff. Holy moly indeed.


  3. - Roadrager - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:01 am:

    The city of Madison, WI is actually suing Kia and Hyundai, saying their unwillingness to address this glaring theft problem has resulted in dedicating way more city resources to car thefts than they would otherwise. I hope other cities and states follow along. It’s been almost a year of this now.


  4. - RNUG - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:07 am:

    Videos and social media have instructions on how to steal them. You don’t need much knowledge.

    It’s almost like the 1960’s, when all you needed was a piece of wire for the coil and a screwdriver to trip the solenoid … not that I would know anything about how to do that.

    Seriously, I’ve been surprised the insurance companies haven’t been all over Kia and Hyundai about this instead of just penalizing the car owners.


  5. - Homebody - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:07 am:

    So how much of the increased car theft during the pandemic was directly attributable to this? Seems like we’d need better/more data to know for sure.


  6. - Captain Obvious - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:11 am:

    I guess if my house gets broken into I should sue my builder for not installing adequate security devices that would deter thieves. Maybe the government should do a better job in crime prevention and enforcement. But they have given up and chosen to mask incompetence by shifting blame. Typical of Democrat led governance.


  7. - Steve Rogers - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:13 am:

    I wonder how the insurance companies will react if you have one of these cars.


  8. - Perrid - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:15 am:

    I’m not sure what basis there is for a lawsuit.


  9. - RNUG - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:18 am:

    == I wonder how the insurance companies will react if you have one of these cars. ==

    By raising rates and / or refusing to insure those brands / models.


  10. - historic66 - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:19 am:

    ===I guess if my house gets broken into I should sue my builder for not installing adequate security devices that would deter thieves. Maybe the government should do a better job in crime prevention and enforcement. But they have given up and chosen to mask incompetence by shifting blame. Typical of Democrat led governance.===

    Please tell me how the builder of your home allowed it to be entered with the use of a USB cable and then refused to fix the problem.

    I certainly don’t see this as blame shifting.


  11. - The Dude Abides - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:20 am:

    Re: Captain Obvious

    The fact that anti-theft devices were not part of *every* make/model of the affected vehicles means that it was a conscious decision by the automaker. Establishing contributory negligence should be a slam dunk.


  12. - Amalia - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:22 am:

    the way to steal is all over Tik Tok so criminally inclined got educated how to do it. maybe have video of criminals getting caught doing this go viral.


  13. - ZC - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:23 am:

    I own a Kia that is ripe for the taking, as they say. Thank God I own a garage or most likely it would have been stolen months ago.

    I contacted my local Kia dealer a few weeks back and said, hey, what can I do to improve my odds here, do you have anything yet to make my vehicle less easy to steal, is there anything in the works.

    They took my number, said they would get back to me, and never have.


  14. - RNUG - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:24 am:

    Slightly off topic but … I still remember years ago when I bought my wife one of the VW convertibles she’s owned, I phoned the insurance company to add it, and the words out of the agent’s mouth was “you do realize that is the most stolen model the past several years?”

    No, I didn’t. And it was never stolen either …


  15. - Responsa - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:25 am:

    Thank you for posting the AG letter. Very informative and upsetting. Unfortunately there was no distinction made between “thefts” where an immobilizer would likely have make a difference (such as from street parking or a parking lot) and “carjacking theft” where the criminal obtains the key/key fob from the victim often by force. This wouldbe useful info to know.


  16. - Perrid - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:27 am:

    Historic66, that sounds like a good reason to use a different builder, it sounds like a good reason to badmouth them until you’re blue in the face, I’m not sure it’s grounds for a lawsuit. There are laws around car safety and recalls, I don’t know any about anti-theft devices.


  17. - Loyal Virus - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:28 am:

    Glad I chose the most basest of base models (manual transmission, one lock on driver’s side door w/old school key) when I bought my Kia way back when.


  18. - Pundent - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:29 am:

    =I guess if my house gets broken into I should sue my builder for not installing adequate security devices that would deter thieves.=

    You do realize that we all pay higher insurance premiums because Hyundai/Kia made the conscious decision to forgo anti-theft devices in the U.S. that other automakers (and Hyundai/Kia outside of the U.S.) consider standard? You might otherwise consider this socialism.


  19. - Chicago Blue - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:46 am:

    A buddy works for one of the big insurance companies and said that the already late, proposed “fix” is easily bypassed by the Kia boys.
    @ Homebody
    There is a direct correlation between the release of the Tik Tok “Kia Boys” video with an increase in motor vehicle theft and reduction in car jackings in Chicago. Obviously, I don’t have a peer-reviewed study, but a lot of folks have been pointing this out every time the CPD commander started crowing about the decrease in car jackings since mid-2022.


  20. - Leap Day William - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:46 am:

    == I guess if my house gets broken into I should sue my builder for not installing adequate security devices that would deter thieves. Maybe the government should do a better job in crime prevention and enforcement. But they have given up and chosen to mask incompetence by shifting blame. Typical of Democrat led governance. ==

    Just goes to show that there’s not a problem in the world that someone won’t use as an opportunity to exercise some Olympic-level mental gymnastics in order to somehow make corporate mal/non-feasance the fault of the Democratic Party.


  21. - OneMan - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:50 am:

    ==I guess if my house gets broken into I should sue my builder for not installing adequate security devices that would deter thieves. ==

    It may be considered a defect that they would be responsible for.

    https://www.nbcchicago.com/consumer/safety-advocates-say-hyundai-kias-anti-theft-upgrade-doesnt-go-far-enough/3078577/

    == Specifically FMVSS 114, which requires all vehicles in the United States to “have a starting system which, whenever the key is removed… prevents the normal activation of the vehicle’s engine or motor.” ==

    I think a better metaphor would be a company that sold electronic door locks that could be disabled by touching them with a nine-volt battery. It seems to be a fit-for-purpose/design issue.

    Ended up getting both of my kids The Club to deal with the risk for now.


  22. - Product of the '60's - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:52 am:

    In February both State Farm and Progressive stopped temporarily taking new policies on certain Kias and Hyundais.


  23. - cover - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 10:59 am:

    = Glad I chose the most basest of base models (manual transmission, one lock on driver’s side door w/old school key) when I bought my Kia way back when. =

    The manual transmission alone will thwart most car thefts.


  24. - Henry - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 11:04 am:

    Figure 4 gives a pretty good idea of the theft split between Kia/Hyundai and the rest of the industry.

    https://www.iihs.org/media/0e14ba17-a3c2-4375-8e66-081df9101ed2/opm7QA/HLDI%20Research/Bulletins/hldi_bulletin_38-28.pdf


  25. - Soccermom - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 11:09 am:

    That’s outrageous. And Capt. Obvious, as the risk (nay, certainty) of completely wasting my time —

    A better analogy is that my builder constructs my house, hands me the keys, assures me that the doors are fastened securely - and then brings a duplicate of my keys to the local hardware store and tells them they can cut and give away duplicates of my house keys to anyone who asks.

    Then my builder goes out and constructs identical (or near identical) versions of my house, for easy identification by thieves. And they’re all accessible via these duplicated keys that the hardware store keeps giving away.

    Yeah, I’d be mad at my builder. Real mad.


  26. - Demoralized - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 11:09 am:

    ==But they have given up and chosen to mask incompetence by shifting blame==

    Yeah. This is the government’s fault. You obviously have no clue as to what the exact issue is or you wouldn’t make such a dumb comment. Captain Oblivious strikes again.


  27. - TinyDancer(FKASue) - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 11:24 am:

    =I guess if my house gets broken into I should sue my builder for not installing adequate security devices that would deter thieves. =

    No equivalency.
    If you’re not happy with the locks on your house you can change them.
    Hard to do that on a car.


  28. - ChrisB - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 11:32 am:

    My wife wanted to visit her friend in Clinton, IL. She drove halfway there in our Palisade before she realized she had left her car keys at our house.


  29. - Original Rambler - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 11:38 am:

    Read somewhere that owners are being advised (not by the manufacturers) to buy steering wheel locks. I wonder how difficult it is these days to install a simple kill switch. It was easy 40 years ago.


  30. - ArchPundit - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 11:40 am:

    ===The city of Madison, WI

    State of Minnesota too. They account for most of the increases in car theft over the last couple years.

    —The manual transmission alone will thwart most car thefts.

    Friend had a jeep in Saint Louis and I asked him how it was never stolen–because most car thieves today can’t drive stick.

    ===I guess if my house gets broken into I should sue my builder for not installing adequate security devices that would deter thieves.Typical of Democrat led governance.

    Someone cannot enter my house and move it. If you want to say that basic consumer protection is Democratic led governance, who am I to argue?


  31. - RNUG - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 11:43 am:

    == If you’re not happy with the locks on your house you can change them.
    Hard to do that on a car. ==

    Depends on the car and your (mostly software) tools. Not the physical keys, but if you have a laptop, the interface cable, and software that can flip every bit, you can do some interesting stuff to features on modern cars. Plus there are a number of (often pricy) modules you can add to some brands to give extra features / functionality to the key fobs that the manufacturer did not envision or offer. It’s a whole new world of hacking and tuning …


  32. - RNUG - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 11:46 am:

    == I wonder how difficult it is these days to install a simple kill switch. It was easy 40 years ago. ==

    Still doable, but takes a bit more knowledge and reading a wiring diagram. Probably the easiest spot on the newer cars is a kill switch in the electric fuel pump circuit.


  33. - Anon324 - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 11:47 am:

    ==== I wonder how the insurance companies will react if you have one of these cars. ==

    By raising rates and / or refusing to insure those brands / models.==

    This has already started:

    https://abcnews.go.com/US/kia-hyundai-models-insurers-refusing-cover-high-theft/story?id=96766632


  34. - historic66 - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 11:49 am:

    ===Historic66, that sounds like a good reason to use a different builder===

    The analogy between cars and houses is laughable.

    Are you saying that those who bought these cars without knowing there would be theft issues should just sell them/trade them in and get something else? That sounds like 20-20 vision in hindsight. It also sounds like you want to blame someone without fixing the problem.


  35. - In_The_Middle - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 12:07 pm:

    Las Vegas, NV police are handing out free steering wheel locks to owners of 2011-2021 Kia or Hyundai automobiles.


  36. - Jocko - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 12:12 pm:

    ==I should sue my builder for not installing adequate security devices==

    You would if the builder installed saloon doors on the front of your house.


  37. - Wensicia - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 12:27 pm:

    I think the worst thing about these thefts is Kia’s (and Hyundai’s) complete abdication of responsibility. I’ve heard nothing from the company or my local dealer about this. When I had my ‘21 Kia serviced a few months ago, I asked what they were doing to fix the problem. They referred me to an auto parts shop for a steering wheel locking mechanism, which they admitted isn’t foolproof. I asked when immobilizer software would be available, they couldn’t give an answer beyond “we’re looking into that”. In the meantime, I have received a letter from my insurance company warning me of the problem and I’m afraid to look at my next insurance bill.

    Total PR disaster on their part. I hope a class action lawsuit on behalf of the owners is in the future.


  38. - TinyDancer(FKASue) - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 1:41 pm:

    =It’s a whole new world of hacking and tuning …=

    Tell me about it.
    Wish they had senior tech workshops at CPL.


  39. - education first - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 1:43 pm:

    on the phone now with Kia corporate. I have a 2020 KIA Soul and I am being told there is no patch available. I then called my local police department who sounded like they had no idea what I was talking about. When Kia said they are providing locks to local police departments, was told mine wasn’t one of them. NOW WHAT?


  40. - RNUG - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 2:30 pm:

    == Wish they had senior tech workshops at CPL. ==

    It’s pretty much brand / automotive group specific … so no real generic instruction. I’m just learning about all the VW / Porsche / Audi group stuff, pretty much by others experiences, and trial and error. Just so I can repair the wife’s VW Eos when needed.

    Because the models use shared software, you can occasionally get weird errors like showing a rear door open on a 2 door, or similar stuff. Luckily the engineers who designed it were smart enough to build in simple reset procedures for most of the error conditions.


  41. - Jocko - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 3:33 pm:

    ==NOW WHAT?==

    Call 800-333-4542 and hope your car falls under the software update. In the meantime, spend $55 and use ‘The Club 3000′ whenever you’re outside your garage.


  42. - thrudasmog - Tuesday, Mar 21, 23 @ 5:58 pm:

    I found out about this early last fall, and advice was “get a Club that goes on the steering wheel.” Got one, used it religiously, and as of last week have had the 2014 Kia Sorrento stolen, driven into a fire hydrant, with $5000+ worth of damage now. The Club? they literally drilled out the lock on it. They left the Club with a hole where the lock was. So much for a deterrent. There is no way to stop it from being stolen.


Sorry, comments for this post are now closed.


* SUBSCRIBERS ONLY - Quick campaign updates
* Reader comments closed for the weekend
* Judge rules Bring Chicago Home referendum should be struck from ballot (Updated x2)
* Isabel’s afternoon roundup
* Doom Grifter announces 2024 'Blue Room Tour' with special guests
* SUBSCRIBERS ONLY - Campaign updates
* Question of the day
* Illinois Is #9 In The U.S. For Reported Gas Leaks, End The Halt On Gas Line Replacement
* It’s just a bill
* More budget news
* Open thread
* Isabel’s morning briefing
* SUBSCRIBERS ONLY - Supplement to today's edition
* SUBSCRIBERS ONLY - Today's edition of Capitol Fax (use all CAPS in password)
* Yesterday's stories

Support CapitolFax.com
Visit our advertisers...

...............

...............

...............


Loading


Main Menu
Home
Illinois
YouTube
Pundit rankings
Obama
Subscriber Content
Durbin
Burris
Blagojevich Trial
Advertising
Updated Posts
Polls

Archives
February 2024
January 2024
December 2023
November 2023
October 2023
September 2023
August 2023
July 2023
June 2023
May 2023
April 2023
March 2023
February 2023
January 2023
December 2022
November 2022
October 2022
September 2022
August 2022
July 2022
June 2022
May 2022
April 2022
March 2022
February 2022
January 2022
December 2021
November 2021
October 2021
September 2021
August 2021
July 2021
June 2021
May 2021
April 2021
March 2021
February 2021
January 2021
December 2020
November 2020
October 2020
September 2020
August 2020
July 2020
June 2020
May 2020
April 2020
March 2020
February 2020
January 2020
December 2019
November 2019
October 2019
September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
December 2018
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
July 2018
June 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
October 2017
September 2017
August 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011
December 2010
November 2010
October 2010
September 2010
August 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
April 2010
March 2010
February 2010
January 2010
December 2009
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004

Blog*Spot Archives
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005

Syndication

RSS Feed 2.0
Comments RSS 2.0




Hosted by MCS SUBSCRIBE to Capitol Fax Advertise Here Mobile Version Contact Rich Miller