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The Tribune’s pension flip-flop

Saturday, Nov 30, 2013

* From the legislative history of SB1, which Speaker Michael Madigan amended with his pension reform language

4/30/2013 House Filed with Clerk by Rep. Michael J. Madigan
4/30/2013 House House Committee Amendment No. 1 Referred to Rules Committee
4/30/2013 House House Committee Amendment No. 1 Rules Refers to Personnel and Pensions Committee

* The amendment was filed shortly before noon on April 30th. Despite the amendment’s length - 277 pages - and its complicated subject matter, the very next morning, on Wednesday, May 1st (which means they wrote it in the hours after the measure was introduced), the Chicago Tribune published an editorial supporting immediate passage of the Madigan proposal...

Illinois cannot afford to put off pension reform. In the two years since Madigan and Cross introduced Senate Bill 512, the unfunded liability has jumped from $85 billion to that $96.8 billion. And those are conservative estimates.

We hope to see swift approval in the House.

* On the morning of Thursday May 2nd, less than two full days after Madigan introduced Amendment 1, the Tribune again argued for swift passage

The Illinois House is expected to vote Thursday on House Speaker Michael Madigan’s pension reform bill… Lawmakers: You have an opportunity to cast a vote that isn’t tough. You have a chance to stabilize the pension system for thousands of government employees.

Do the right thing for the state — for teachers, for state workers other government employees, yes, taxpayers too — and pass pension reform.

* Later that day, Speaker Madigan introduced an 11-page cleanup amendment and pushed it through the House Rules committee and onto the House floor.

This was not a minor amendment

In each of the funding guarantees, provides that the State pledges not to impair the rights and remedies of the boards of trustees as set forth in the funding guarantees (rather than any rights and remedies of the boards of trustees); also makes changes in the State funding pledge. Provides that the changes, the impact of changes, and the implementation of changes made to the State Employees, State Universities, or Downstate Teacher Article of the Illinois Pension Code, or to the General Provisions Article of that Code as it applies to those Articles, made by the amendatory Act, and those Articles thereafter, are not subject to interest arbitration or any award issued pursuant to interest arbitration. In the Budget Stabilization Act, deletes the reference to terminating transfers into the Pension Stabilization Fund if any provision of the amendatory Act is held invalid, which duplicates the effect of the inseverability provision. Makes changes in the Findings Section. Makes changes to the inseverability provision. Also makes technical and other changes.

* The same day the clean-up amendment passed committee, and the same day that the Tribune had argued a second time for its “swift approval,” the full bill cleared the House

5/2/2013 House Third Reading - Short Debate - Passed 062-051-002

* The Tribune hailed its passage

For more than six years, we’ve called for reform of Illinois’ public pension system. Some days we begged legislators, some days we harangued them.

Today we’re pleased to list the names of House lawmakers who took responsible action Thursday and voted “yes” on Speaker Michael Madigan’s pension overhaul.

* And then, on November 7th of this year, the Tribune editorialized on the Chicago Park District pension reform bill

The bill came out of nowhere and zoomed through the House and Senate with big margins… If only the same sense of urgency could benefit the state’s drastically underfunded pension system.

* So, to sum up, the Tribune twice demanded immediate passage of a huge and complicated pension reform bill, once the morning after it was introduced and then the very next day, before it was amended with some much-needed clean-up language. After it passed, the Tribune praised those who voted for it.

A few months later, the Tribune wondered why “the same sense of urgency” wasn’t being applied to state pension reform as it had been to a local pension reform bill that “zoomed” through both chambers.

* Yet, as we’ve already discussed, the same editorial board now wants the process slowed down

An hour or two to review a Democratic or Republican staff analysis — the usual talking points from House and Senate staff distributed to lawmakers — won’t cut it. A daylong Tuesday pension-palooza of jamming ideas down lawmakers’ throats will invite broad suspicion.

House Speaker Michael Madigan and Senate President John Cullerton, Republican leaders Jim Durkin and Christine Radogno: Give the public time to review these changes after you settle on final language.

Put your work on display. Let’s see it.

* And the editorial board has once again made the same demand in its Sunday editorial

The bill is expected to move through a pension conference committee Tuesday morning before heading to votes in the House and Senate on the same day. That time frame will smack of a rush job if the legislative language isn’t released in time for a full airing. Let’s see the bill.

* So after years of arguing for swift passage of a pension bill, why all of a sudden is the Tribune so worried about taking it slow?

Pardon me if I don’t wonder whether the Tribune might not be playing a cute game of under the table footsie with the Bruce Rauner campaign, which is making the same argument about delaying a vote.

And you’ll have to excuse me if my tinfoil hat was catching mega rays when the Tribune editorial board published an op-ed by Rauner’s single largest campaign contributor and a member of his campaign finance team that demanded a pension bill vote delay and trashed the bill with only this identifying information

Kenneth Griffin is the founder and CEO of Citadel.

I won’t argue at all with legitimate demands for legislative transparency. But the Tribune hasn’t shown any real interest in transparency as far as pension bills go. Why all of a sudden is the Tribune so worried about taking more time to hold a vote?

Something is wrong here. It almost seems like the Tribune is looking for an excuse to bail.

- Posted by Rich Miller   Comments Off      


A quick analysis of the pension reform proposal

Friday, Nov 29, 2013

* I asked our resident pension expert commenter “RNUG” to take a quick look at the pension reform dot points distributed by the four leaders today. His thoughts are indented…

Funding schedule and method for certifying contributions: Establishes an actuarially sound funding schedule to achieve 100% funding no later than the end of FY 2044. Contributions will be certified using the entry age normal actuarial cost method (EAN), which averages costs evenly over the pensioner’s employment and results in level contributions.

    This is a good move but do we really need to be 100% funded? I understand that 100% sounds good to both the public and the bond rating agencies but I think it is over kill. Somewhere around 80% - 90% would be more than adequate.

Supplemental contributions: The State will contribute (i) $364 million in FY 2019, (ii) $1 billion annually thereafter through 2045 or until the system reaches 100% funding, and (iii) 10% of the annual savings resulting from pension reform beginning in FY 2016 until the system reaches 100% funding. These contributions will be “pure add on,” which means State contributions in any year will not be reduced by these amounts.

    Without seeing more details, I’m going to assume the add-on amounts in (i) & (ii) are the funds freed up by the expiration of the current pension bonds. Since that money is currently being paid out, this is “free” money as far as the GA is concerned. As to (iii), I have a problem with only 10% of the savings going into the pension funds. That tells me there are plans for the other 90% of the savings, either avoiding the need to keep the income tax at the 5% level or to cover expansion of other state program expenses or for new spending. Sorry to be a bit vague on where the 90% might go.

Funding guarantee: If the State fails to make a pension payment or a supplemental contribution, a retirement system may file an action in the Illinois Supreme Court to compel the State to make the required pension payment and/or supplemental contribution set by law each year.

    As I commented in one of the other posts, if this is the same as previous proposals, and it sounds like it is without being able to read the actual bill language, all this does is provide the retirement system with the right to sue and, maybe, giving retirees the right to sue the retirement system (not the State) if the retirement system fails to act. I don’t see it as consideration; at a stretch it might be considered a group right. It is not an individual right any retiree can exercise against the State itself, so I don’t think it meets the contract law definition of individual consideration. Brighter minds than myself may well disagree. And then there is the whole issue of it being a one sided and non-voluntary (coerced) choice.

Employee contribution: Employees will contribute 1% less of their salary toward their pension.

    That could be a valid consideration for changing the AAI for current employees, especially when you look at the GARS, TRS and SURS systems where they pay either 0.5% or 1% for their AAI (COLA).

Annual annuity adjustment (COLAs): Future COLAs will be based on a retiree’s years of service and the full CPI. The annual increase will be equal to 3% of years of service multiplied by $1,000 ($800 for those coordinated with social security). The $1000/$800 will be adjusted each year by the CPI for everyone (retirees and current employees). Those with an annuity that is less than their years of service multiplied by $1000/$800, or whatever the amount is at the time of retirement, will receive a COLA equal to 3% compounded each year until their annuity reaches that amount.

    This is where almost all the “savings” come from. For GARS, JRS, TRS, some SURS & some SERS, the $1,000 per year figure will apply. For most SERS and some SURS, the $800 figure will apply. Those figures are quite interesting. Assuming any average of 30 years for a teacher, their AAI will be based on $30,000. Assuming 35 years for an average state employee (SERS), their AAI will be based on a pension of $28,000. In other words, those numbers were picked by using some of the retirement system averages.

    While every situation will be different and there are lots of variations, we can calculate a couple of examples. Assuming a average 1.5 CPI to adjust the $800 amount, a SERS retiree with 35 years of service currently receiving $30,000 as an annual pension will receive about $47,000 less in total over the next 20 years when compared to the 3% AAI.

    If you double the current pension to $60,000, the diminishment really kicks in; that retiree would receive about $330,000 less over 20 years.

    As I noted, this is intended to kind of keep the average retiree somewhat whole while playing on the public envy of the well off state retiree. A very carefully crafted piece of work. Don’t think it is constitutional based on previously rulings, but I have to admire the thought that went into it.

    One possible problem with the $1000 / $800 per year of service formula. Since we haven’t seen the actual language, it really needs to be based on the same number of years of service the pension is based on regardless of the actual years worked. In other words, any purchased service time should be included as part of the COLA calculation.

Additionally, current employees will miss annual adjustments depending on age: employees 50 or over miss 1 adjustment (year 2); 49-47 miss 3 adjustments (years 2, 4, and 6); 46-44 miss 4 adjustments (years 2, 4, 6, and 8); 43 and under miss 5 adjustments (years 2, 4, 6, 8, 10).

    I see the logic of gradually applying it to the younger employees in order to create the illusion of fairness, but it is a apparently unconstitutional change to existing employees.

Pensionable salary cap: Applies the Tier II salary cap ($109,971 for 2013), which is annually adjusted by the lesser of 3% or ½ of the annual CPI-U. Salaries that currently exceed the cap or that will exceed the cap based on raises in a collective bargaining agreement would be grandfathered in.

    I’m going to assume the bill language will be similar to what we have seen earlier this year. They are applying the SS salary cap. But then they limit the pensionable salary growth with a 1/2 CPI or 3% cap, so it will gradually fall below the SS cap. The grandfathering of salaries exceeding the cap is probably not as clear as the bullet point states. In the previous proposals, that exemption only applied until the end of the current contract.

Retirement age: For those 45 years of age or under, the retirement age will be increased on a graduated scale. For each year a member is under 46, the retirement age will be increased by 4 months (up to 5 years).

    It’s a reasonable approach to changing the retirement age but it rules counter to previous ISC rulings for existing employees.

Effective rate of interest (ERI): For all purposes, the ERI for SURS and the rate of regular interest for TRS will be the interest rate paid by 30-year U.S. Treasury bonds plus 75 basis points.

    Insufficient knowledge of that specific program to give an informed opinion. I do know someone who might be able to answer it, but I probably can’t get an answer quickly.

GARS Tier 2 fix: Brings GARS Tier 2 salary cap and annual adjustment in line with other Tier 2 benefits.

    Insufficient knowledge of that specific program to give an informed opinion quickly.

Pension abuses: Prohibits future members of non-governmental organizations from participating in IMRF, SURS, and TRS. Prohibits new hires from using sick or vacation time toward pensionable salary or years of service (applies to SERS, SURS, TRS, IMRF, Cook County, and Chicago Teachers).

    Good move closing a loophole that has been abused in the past. Changing it for new hires also passes the constitutionality test. It will result in the new hires, if career employees, receiving about 1/2 year less in service time than under the current rules.

Defined contribution plan: Beginning July 1, 2015, up to 5% of Tier 1 active members have the option of joining a defined contribution plan. The plan must be revenue neutral and employee contributions will be equal to those for the defined benefit plan. If a member chooses to opt into the defined contribution plan, benefits previously accrued in the defined benefit plan will be frozen.

    Basically offering a 401K style plan (assume it will actually be a 403b variation) to existing employees. It’s been discussed at length on this blog, but such a plan is probably a bad choice for most employees, and especially so for those near retirement. The only people it would benefit are non-career employees who only work at the state for a few years. In other words, this could be a sweet deal for political appointees that won’t be around long enough to earn a Defined Benefit pension.

Collective bargaining: All pension matters, except pension pickups, are removed from collective bargaining.

    Can look at this two different ways. On the one hand, it pretty much acknowledges that the union can not negotiate for the retirees. On the other hand, it prevents the unions from throwing the retirees under the bus in exchange for additional employee considerations.

Healthcare payments: Prohibits the State pension systems from using pension funds to pay healthcare costs.

    Not really anything new; just explicitly states it. Health insurance has always been paid out of either the State’s General Revenue Fund as an annual expense (SERS, GARS, JRS, some SURS) or partially subsidized by the separate TRIPS program (TRS, some SURS). but I think this is intended to slam the door on health insurance being considered a pension benefit ala Judge Nardulli’s ruling in the consolidated ‘Maag’ case. Mostly closing the barn door in case the ISC rules in favor of the retirees.

* And here’s his summary…

It is apparent a LOT of thought went into this proposal. Not only is it crafted to solve the pension “funding” problem but it is also crafted to provide the illusion of fairness to employees near retirement age and the retirees. As such, it is a fairly masterful piece of public relations. Not enough so to prevent employee / retiree outrage, but enough to delude the uninformed public (dare I say low information voter?) into believing the GA proposal is more than reasonable and fair.

Some of the items proposed, especially those affecting only new hires or offering a voluntary choice, will easily pass contract and constitutional muster.

A lot of what is proposed does not seem to meet contract law or constitutional muster based on the clear language of the pension clause and the various rulings by the ISC, both before and after the 1970 constitution. I’m having a problem reconciling any changes to either retirees or current employees with the previous rulings that, in effect, state the rules in place at hiring plus enhancements granted by the General Assembly at what is protected by the pension clause.

So the real question is what is Madigan’s real end game? Is it to railroad this through and twist the arms of the ISC to buy a “police powers” arguments? Is it to try to get the ISC the change their “rules are time of hiring …” logic to “only benefits already earned are protected” like in a number of other states? Or is it an intentionally unconstitutional bill in an attempt to get ISC coverage for a tax increase? Only time will tell.

- Posted by Rich Miller   Comments Off      


*** UPDATED x1 *** Rauner team puts on full-court press against pension bill

Friday, Nov 29, 2013

[Before reading this, you might want to take a look at the new pension reform outline post.]

* You’ll recall that Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner had this to say the other day about the pension reform agreement reached by all four legislative leaders

Unfortunately, the Springfield insiders have kept Illinoisans in the dark about the details of this bill. We’ve seen politicians do this before and it is rarely a good sign for taxpayers.

Any deal that would rank pension payouts to government union bosses ahead of priorities like education and public safety should cause grave concern and will lead to higher taxes.

* Rauner’s good friend Ken Griffin, who is the richest man in Illinois and has contributed more than $250,000 to Rauner’s campaign, followed up with an op-ed in the Tribune which expounds on Rauner’s talking points

Now our political leaders say they have made a breakthrough. In closed door meetings, hidden from public view, they have drafted legislation that’s intended to show they can get something done. But in this case, getting nothing done would be preferable to the passage of legislation that all but ensures the economic demise of our great state.

The proposed legislation provides for modest reforms of our broken pension system coupled with guarantees that payments to government employee pensions will come before paying for schools, hospitals, parks, police or fire protection. This isn’t a reform, but rather a fiscal death sentence: The state would be stuck with pension funding requirements that squeeze out all other priorities and tie the hands of future leaders.

The bitter truth is that our politicians have sold government employees a fraudulent bill of goods. Absent extraordinary economic growth, our state is going to collapse under the weight of generous pension promises made by union leaders and politicians. And with each passing day, the $100 billion gap between what has been promised and what is provided for grows by roughly $5 million.

Here is where this story will inevitably end: Our state is going to be forced to break its promises to our government employees and retirees. They will receive less than they bargained for. Our state’s taxpayers will see the 67 percent “temporary” tax increase converted into a permanent tax increase. And soon we will hear that even further tax increases are needed to meet our obligations. This is the price we are all going to pay for sending the wrong leaders to Springfield for too many years.

That op-ed does a good job of explaining what Rauner was really talking about. He opposes the proposal because he hates the funding guarantee, believing it would “rank pension payouts to government union bosses ahead of priorities like education and public safety.”

* And the Illinois Policy Institute, which received a $500,000 contribution from Rauner, piled on for good measure

The bill adds a pension-funding guarantee, prioritizing government worker pensions over all core spending. If pensions weren’t already squeezing out core spending enough already, Madigan’s bill adds a pension-funding guarantee to appease the unions. With Madigan’s minimal reforms, this funding guarantee will lock in further tax increases and increase the burden on taxpayers. A vote for this bill is a vote for tax hikes.

Notice how they refer to this as “Madigan’s” bill, when, in fact, the proposal has been agreed to by all four legislative leaders, including the two Republicans.

Some of the rest of the Policy Institute’s analysis is off base. The bill does impose a means test on cost of living allowance adjustments, for instance.

All that’s missing so far is a full-on attack by Reboot Illinois, which is funded by Ken Griffin’s independently wealthy spouse.

…Adding… From Reboot’s executive editor…

Rich: Sorry to disappoint. No attack here:

http://www.rebootillinois.com/?opinion=9129

* Meanwhile, the Sun-Times editorial board warned Rauner to back off

Madigan on Wednesday said Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner has been lobbying Republicans to reject the deal because the “funding guarantee,” the clause that obliges the state to make its annual pension payment, is too strong and could hamstring the state.

Hogwash.

Under the funding guarantee, as we understand it and as it has been drafted in other pension bills, the state retains some flexibility, particularly in the event of a financial crisis. And more importantly, the state has a fiscal and moral responsibility to make these payments — its failure to do so helped create this pension mess. The guarantee also could help the state’s credit rating and could help the bill survive a court challenge.

Given the thinness of the argument against the funding guarantee, we fear this is straight politics. Solving the state’s fiscal mess could undercut Rauner’s chances to win either in March or November by giving his opponents a key victory. We reached out to Rauner on this but didn’t get a return call.

* So far, there’s nothing new from the Tribune editorial board on the substance of the proposal, although it did warn the other day - in an apparent preview of one of Rauner’s two main talking points - that leaders should give legislators and the public an opportunity to see the bill before it’s voted on. The Tribune has editorialized in the past against a funding guarantee, however.

*** UPDATE *** From the Illinois Policy Institute…

“We have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it.”

Remember when former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi said this about ObamaCare?

Well, the Illinois General Assembly is repeating that horrible mistake, and we need your help today to stop them.

Illinois’ legislative leaders announced a pension “fix” right before Thanksgiving. And lawmakers have been called back to Springfield on Tuesday to vote on the measure.

The only problem? No one has seen the bill.

Legislative leaders released an outline of the plan earlier today. We quickly provided a breakdown of the proposal – based on what we know, it delays reform and keeps Illinois in a constant state of crisis.

It’s likely that a bill will not appear until late Monday. That means legislators will only have a few hours to digest a complicated piece of legislation dealing with the most critical fiscal issue in Illinois before voting on it.

We’ve been down this road before. We know where it leads. We need your help right now to mount a full-scale campaign to make sure that this bill – negotiated in secret, agreed on in secret and being drafted in secret – gets to see some daylight before legislators vote on it.

Please help us today – let’s demand to see the bill!

In liberty,

Jonathan Greenberg
Vice President of External Relations

P.S. Illinois taxpayers and government workers can’t afford pension “glitches.” Lawmakers should refuse to pass a pension bill to find out what is in it. We need your help right now to block a backdoor pension deal.

All of the links lead to a fundraising page which asks people to “Donate today and help us block Madigan’s backdoor pension deal!”

Perhaps not coincidentally, I received a blast e-mail earlier today from an e-mail address which made it appear as though it were sent by Gov. Pat Quinn. The e-mail provided a link to a clever little YouTube video that “thanks” Illinois Republicans for cooperating with Democrats on the pension bill

- Posted by Rich Miller   Comments Off      


*** UPDATED x1 *** *** BREAKING *** LEADERS ISSUE PENSION REFORM OVERVIEW

Friday, Nov 29, 2013

[12:30 pm: The four legislative leaders have now sent this same outline to the news media, so I’m taking off the subscriber protection.]

* 11:20 am - The Senate Democrats just sent this memo about the leadership agreement on a pension reform bill to members…

*** UPDATE *** The House Democrats just called to say that the “final” version is a bit different than the Senate Democrats’ version, so I’ve replaced the SDem version with the one labeled “final.” It follows below.

[ *** End Of Update *** ]

Funding schedule and method for certifying contributions: Establishes an actuarially sound funding schedule to achieve 100% funding no later than the end of FY 2044. Contributions will be certified using the entry age normal actuarial cost method (EAN), which averages costs evenly over the pensioner’s employment and results in level contributions.

Supplemental contributions: The State will contribute (i) $364 million in FY 2019, (ii) $1 billion annually thereafter through 2045 or until the system reaches 100% funding, and (iii) 10% of the annual savings resulting from pension reform beginning in FY 2016 until the system reaches 100% funding. These contributions will be “pure add on,” which means State contributions in any year will not be reduced by these amounts.

Funding guarantee: If the State fails to make a pension payment or a supplemental contribution, a retirement system may file an action in the Illinois Supreme Court to compel the State to make the required pension payment and/or supplemental contribution set by law each year.

Employee contribution: Employees will contribute 1% less of their salary toward their pension.

Annual annuity adjustment (COLAs): Future COLAs will be based on a retiree’s years of service and the full CPI. The annual increase will be equal to 3% of years of service multiplied by $1,000 ($800 for those coordinated with social security). The $1000/$800 will be adjusted each year by the CPI for everyone (retirees and current employees). Those with an annuity that is less than their years of service multiplied by $1000/$800, or whatever the amount is at the time of retirement, will receive a COLA equal to 3% compounded each year until their annuity reaches that amount.

Additionally, current employees will miss annual adjustments depending on age: employees 50 or over miss 1 adjustment (year 2); 49-47 miss 3 adjustments (years 2, 4, and 6); 46-44 miss 4 adjustments (years 2, 4, 6, and 8); 43 and under miss 5 adjustments (years 2, 4, 6, 8, 10).

Pensionable salary cap: Applies the Tier II salary cap ($109,971 for 2013), which is annually adjusted by the lesser of 3% or ½ of the annual CPI-U. Salaries that currently exceed the cap or that will exceed the cap based on raises in a collective bargaining agreement would be grandfathered in.

Retirement age: For those 45 years of age or under, the retirement age will be increased on a graduated scale. For each year a member is under 46, the retirement age will be increased by 4 months (up to 5 years).

Effective rate of interest (ERI): For all purposes, the ERI for SURS and the rate of regular interest for TRS will be the interest rate paid by 30-year U.S. Treasury bonds plus 75 basis points.

GARS Tier 2 fix: Brings GARS Tier 2 salary cap and annual adjustment in line with other Tier 2 benefits.

Pension abuses: Prohibits future members of non-governmental organizations from participating in IMRF, SURS, and TRS. Prohibits new hires from using sick or vacation time toward pensionable salary or years of service (applies to SERS, SURS, TRS, IMRF, Cook County, and Chicago Teachers).

Defined contribution plan: Beginning July 1, 2015, up to 5% of Tier 1 active members have the option of joining a defined contribution plan. The plan must be revenue neutral and employee contributions will be equal to those for the defined benefit plan. If a member chooses to opt into the defined contribution plan, benefits previously accrued in the defined benefit plan will be frozen.

Collective bargaining: All pension matters, except pension pickups, are removed from collective bargaining.

Healthcare payments: Prohibits the State pension systems from using pension funds to pay healthcare costs.

- Posted by Rich Miller   Comments Off      


PREVIOUS POSTS »
* Prison reform group responds to new Rauner ad
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        * Survivors group challenges next Chicago archbishop
        * New Indiana Toll Road operator due amid bankruptcy
        * A look at Chicago's incoming, outgoing archbishops
        * George intends to keep contributing to church life
        * Journal aims to stoke interest in Midwest history
        * Cupich: Pope sending a bishop, not a message
        * Catholics in Chicago await successor announcement

        * Statehouse Insider: Rauner hit with double whammy
        * More than $59M collected from state retirees; refunds coming eventually
        * Lawmaker wants pumpkin to be official Illinois pie
        * Quinn: No pension ‘Plan B’ before court ruling
        * Sangamon Co. judge: Libertarian candidate for governor can stay on ballot
        * Illinois’ jobless rate continues 6-month decline
        * GOP’s Rauner no fan of gambling, airport slots
        * GOP’s Rauner no fan of gambling, airport slots
        * Jeb Bush headlining Chicago fundraiser for Rauner
        * Rochester resident to lead State Board of Elections

        * Scramble is on for tenants to anchor a third office tower
        * A grandmother can be CEO — or president
        * Which Chicago startup will be next with an IPO?
        * When $400 million can't buy love
        * The bleeding has stopped, but Navistar is still struggling


        * Editorial: Bishop a good fit for Chicago
        * Chicago’s next archbishop Blase Cupich calls for immigration reform, shows off his humor
        * Convicted rapist charged in 2004 murder, rape on South Side
        * Reports: Bishop Blase Cupich of Spokane will be Cardinal Francis George successor
        * ‘Hello’ in Riverside ends up getting South Side man a DUI charge
        * 2 dead, 21 wounded in shootings across Chicago since Friday night
        * Apple fans answer the iPhone’s call
        * Chicago Scots gather to await results of independence vote
        * Gas, electric price hike estimates lowered by northern Indiana utility


        * Man dead, 13 others wounded in city shootings
        * Police: 2 charged in city tow truck scam
        * 2 wounded in city shootings
        * Prosecutors: Gunman told fellow gang member 'I just hit a shorty'
        * Extra-alarm fire at West Side church
        * Chicago-area storm watches canceled
        * Man fatally stabbed in Gresham neighborhoood
        * Man dies after being hit by motorcycle in Romeoville
        * Spokane bishop introduced as Chicago's next archbishop


        * Cupich to be next Chicago archbishop
        * Treasurer Candidate Tom Cross Says He Would Sue The Legislature To Force A Balanced Budget
        * Listen to State Week - September 19, 2014
        * Quinn Defends Public Education, Though He's A Product of Private Schools
        * Chris Mooney: More Evidence-Based Policymaking Needed
        * African Drumming At Southwind Park On Saturday
        * Investors gather in Chicago seeking cannabis businesses
        * Climate, Space Create Challenges For Local Food
        * Can A Governor Really Create Jobs?
        * How do you find high school dropouts?


        * Our Opinion: Springfield needs Magro project
        * Angie Muhs: Open government is worth fighting for
        * Statehouse Insider: Rauner hit with double whammy
        * Statehouse Insider: Rauner hit with double whammy
        * Bernard Schoenburg: Bull flies in 13th Congressional race
        * More than $59M collected from state retirees; refunds coming eventually
        * Jan Gambach: Recovery is possible
        * Maurine Magliocco: Education Task Force at work
        * Lawmaker wants pumpkin to be official Illinois pie
        * Deborah Davis: NFL sends mixed messages over Ray Rice case


        * Flu shots available in Carbondale
        * Academy of Music welcomed 19th century stage greats
        * Top of the Morning, Sept. 21, 2014
        * Area Calendar 9/21/14
        * Accident sends two to hospital
        * IDOT offering motorcycle training
        * 2013 Kid Que winners use spice to raise money
        * Police reports
        * Sweden moves slightly left
        * Sweet second chance


        * Sunday picks: Soprano Karen Slack takes on 'Tosca'
        * Firefighters finally home from Cabo: 'We figured it was time to try'
        * Coughlan's huge day lifts Cubs
        * Forrest leads WW South at Wheeling
        * Girls tennis: Saturday's results

        * Rep. candidate pushes to uphold marriage b...
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        * FAA Rejects Call For New O'Hare Noise Stud...
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        * Northwestern gets grant to prevent sexual ......
        * Northwestern gets grant to prevent sexual ......
        * Northwestern gets grant to prevent sexual ......
        * Northwestern gets grant to prevent sexual ......
        * Northwestern gets grant to prevent sexual ......

        * Diplomats: Iran receptive to softened nuke......

        * The Road to Riches
        * 5 reasons iPhone still beats Android
        * The [Tuesday] Papers
        * The Beachwood Radio Hour #24: Pussy Riot, Rahm & Rauner
        * Principal Troy LaRaviere on Chicago school policy. The public loses out and private corporations profit.
        * Solidarity with the thousands of people in NY September 21st.
        * Charon Bryson switches parties to become new 7th Ward GOP committeeman
        * Shimkus: Keeping the Internet Open and Free
        * Illinois Dems shed "little guy" persona with pricey reception for Mike Madigan
        * Rauner endorsed by the Illinois Chamber of Commerce


        * Quinn still refusing to fire 20 political cronies
        * Illinois Chamber of Commerce Endorses Rauner for Governor
        * Rauner Web Ad: “Cut from the Same Cloth”
        * Illinois Department of Human Rights Commemorates International Day of Peace
        * Quinn Misleads Public on IDOT Again




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