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Question of the day

Tuesday, Jul 31, 2012

* JBT is on a statewide tour

Judy Baar Topinka was greeted warmly Monday at a Quad-City agency for developmentally disabled, even though as Illinois’ comptroller she had to deliver the news the state is far behind in paying its bills.

“It’s nice to see so many smiling faces,” Topinka said at The Arc of the Quad-Cities Area. “When you owe $8 billion in unpaid bills, friends are hard to come by.”

As of Monday, the state owed The Arc $1.3 million, the agency’s director of development and communications, Maureen Dickinson, said.

Standing with leaders and clients at The Arc’s facility on 9th Street in Rock Island, Topinka said government budget cuts and state payment delays have created staggering fiscal challenges for the state’s service agencies.

Topinka offered a hot line for agencies on the verge of shutting their doors at 855-IL-ASK-US, where she said a “real, live person” can assist them about what their options might be.

“I never want to hear any of your agencies shutting down due to state payment delays,” she said. “I would consider that a personal failure.”

* More stories from the tour…

* Comptroller Topinka visits Rockford to support not-for-profits: “Not-for-profit and service agencies are the backbone of our state. Their services make all the difference when it comes to the quality of life, if not survival, or our most vulnerable residents. We cannot have them shut down because of state payment delays,” Topinka said. “I urge those agencies to contact my office if they are in dire straits because of payment delays, and we will do everything we can to keep them going.”

* Comptroller: Parc may be facing worst - Judy Baar Topinka assures crowd they are not forgotten

* A photo

* The Question: Caption?

And keep it clean, people. Thanks.

- Posted by Rich Miller   40 Comments      


*** UPDATED x2 *** Quinn pulls media stunt over assault weapons ban

Tuesday, Jul 31, 2012

* This just in… yet another press pop

Gov. Pat Quinn plans to propose a ban on assault weapons in Illinois.

The Democrat will use his amendatory veto power Tuesday to include the ban in a bill related to ammunition sales. It would then be up to lawmakers to accept his changes or reject them. […]

His proposal will face big hurdles in Illinois, even after the massacre at a Colorado movie theater renewed national debate about assault weapons.

Cook County’s ban has undergone legal challenges. The Illinois Supreme Court this year reversed lower-court rulings that found the ban constitutional, sending it to trial court.

* From the governor’s AV message

I am a strong supporter of the Second Amendment - the right to bear arms.

However, the proliferation of military-style assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines undermines public safety and the rights of personal security of every citizen.

* So, why is this a media stunt? Well, I’ll tell you why.

The Senate bill in question is sponsored by Sen. Dave Luechtefeld, a southern Illinois Republican. As the sponsor, he controls the bill’s fate. And there’s no way Luechtefeld will ever move to accept that amendatory veto. Not gonna happen. Not even if Hell freezes over.

This amendatory veto is merely a way to get the governor’s name in the headlines yet again. Nothing more, nothing less.

*** UPDATE 1 *** And it begins. From a press release…

GOVERNOR’S PUBLIC SCHEDULE
**Tuesday, July, 31 2012**

CHICAGO – Governor Pat Quinn will hold a media availability with Orland Park Police Chief and American hero Tim McCarthy to discuss the governor’s action today seeking a ban on assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines in Illinois.

WHEN: 1:30 p.m.

WHERE: Fulton’s
The Bridge Room
315 North LaSalle Street
Chicago, 60654

*** UPDATE 2 *** The Sun-Times contacted Sen. Luechtefeld, the bill’s sponsor

The underlying bill’s sponsor, state Sen. David Luechtefeld (R-Okawville), predicted Quinn’s actions may doom the original legislation because Chicago Democrats will be loathe to support an override and cast votes against the governor on a gun-control issue.

Luechtefeld also accused Quinn of trying to take political advantage of the July 20 shootings in the Denver suburb of Aurora, where 12 theater-goers were murdered and another 58 were wounded by an assailant bearing an assault weapon.

“He likely knows this won’t go any place,” Luechtefeld said of Quinn. “But because of what happened in Colorado, he’s going to exploit that as much as he can.”

To override Quinn’s amendatory veto, Luechtefeld would need 36 votes in the Senate and 71 votes in the House, where House Speaker Michael Madigan (D-Chicago) traditionally blocks such wholesale rewrites of legislation by governors.

If those supermajorities aren’t reached and there is not a majority vote in each chamber to accept Quinn’s changes, the underlying bill will die, along with the governor’s proposed bans on the sale and possession of assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines.

- Posted by Rich Miller   54 Comments      


The drought continues, while farmers hope to keep disease testing lab open

Tuesday, Jul 31, 2012

* I was in southern Illinois over the weekend to visit a county fair, and the farmers were all talking about how their corn crop was basically nothing. But they have yet another worry on the horizon. If they don’t get rain soon, their soybean crop will be the next on the failure list

Any rain that comes now will be too late to help the corn crop, but it might salvage soybeans, area farmers say. […]

It’s still too early to assess how badly soybeans will be affected, but there’s concern the crop hasn’t received enough moisture to fill out pods.

Many pods may have only one or two beans, rather than the customary three, said Scott Docherty, general manager of Topflight Grain Cooperative at Monticello.

The hay crop is pathetic as well. Several farmers I talked to were preparing to mow their failed corn crop to use as animal feed.

* And then there’s this

There are concerns aflatoxin may be a problem in corn since this is a dry year, Docherty said.

Drought-related stress can make a plant vulnerable to the toxic fungus. When aflatoxin levels exceed certain thresholds, farmers can’t sell the affected crops for feed.

As for soybeans, Docherty said he has had some reports of spider mites in fields.

* The very real threat of aflatoxin is just one of many reasons why Gov. Pat Quinn has decided to keep the Centralia Animal Disease Lab open for a little while

Governor Quinn is keeping the Centralia Animal Disease Lab open. The lab was supposed to close at the end of August but because of an increased workload due to extreme drought conditions, the lab will stay in use for an indefinite period of time.

Lab workers don’t know what this recent news means. Workers have been through their share of ups and downs. At the start of June, lawmakers allotted funds to keep the lab open, along with the other state facilities slated for closure. At the end of June, Governor Quinn signed the state budget that removed that funding. City officials look at this as another opportunity to show the value of the lab to the Governor. […]

Governor Quinn’s office says the lab is staying open until further notice because of the drought. The 16 employees there have no idea how much time that buys them. Ashby is working with a coalition of five county boards, mayors, economic development boards, and farmers to keep the lab open for good.

Ashby says the lab costs around $200,000 a year to run. The coalition wants to institute larger fees to keep the lab running and possibly make it self-sufficient. The lab serves more than 200 communities, and Ashby says this drought proves how important and necessary the lab is.

* But it appears that only the crop testing portion of the facility will remain open through the drought

In an email response Friday evening, Quinn spokesperson Kelly Kraft wrote: “Due to severe drought conditions in the area the Governor is making certain essential crop testing continues at the lab until further notice.”

* As I said, I was in southern Illinois over the weekend and happened to talk with Dr. Ed Schreiber, a highly respected veterinarian who’s passionate about keeping the Centralia Animal Disease Lab open for business. Doc Schreiber was invited to speak to the crowd assembled before the 4-H livestock auction about the pending closure and he mentioned that he had written the governor a letter. I asked him for a copy. Here’s part of it

The [Centralia Animal Disease Lab] is strategically located in the epicenter of animal agriculture in Southern Illinois. Clinton County has the largest livestock production in our State.

With the CADL gone the time between detection and diagnosis of an animal health problem could be so long as to cost the State many more millions of dollars than we will ever realize in savings.

I will also attach an article concerning the economic impact of a mock Foot and Mouth Disease Virus outbreak in California. In summary, as the diagnostic delay went from 7 days to 22 days the number of slaughtered cattle went from 8,700 to 260, 400 and the median national loss in total agricultural surplus ranged from $2.3 billion to $69 billion. Both the Galesburg and Centralia labs are currently qualified to prepare tissues for diagnostics for Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (Mad Cow Disease). It is critically important to keep this capability in our State near our largest cattle region. Multiple hours or days of shipment time for some tissues especially brain will prevent these samples from being diagnostically useful (aka they will be soup). How would that look in the media if our State government closed the only lab in the southern two-thirds of our State in which the Federal government has accredited to do this work? […]

If just three 100 cow dairies had dramatic mortalities due to inaccurate or absent testing, the total dollars saved by our State would be negated by the losses experienced by these farm families.

* Dr. Schreiber also played into Gov. Quinn’s fondness for touting the state’s agriculture exports

Without the [Centralia Animal Disease Lab] there also would not be a single animal toxicology lab in our State and this function also would not be transferred to Galesburg. Without the CADL there will be only one lab in the entire United States able test for arsenic. This is a test the Russians require for all poultry meat being shipped to their country.

Without the CADL the Illinois exporters of premium swine genetics around the world will have to look for another lab to do the export testing these countries require. The Chinese will not be happy.

Is it worth jeopardizing millions of dollars of Illinois export?

If you close the Centralia Lab the State’s veterinary community will no longer have a complete laboratory to be a part of their IVERT program designed to mobilize in the event of man-made or natural disasters. Does Illinois really have to stoop so low that we have to depend on other state’s infrastructure in the face of a catastrophic animal or public health emergency? What if these other labs are already overwhelmed?

* Schreiber then mentioned this chilling moment

If your family discovered a dead bat in your backyard where your small children play, you would no longer have an option here in Southern Illinois to take that bat for rabies testing since there was not a confirmed human bite exposure.

A very timely example that demonstrates the public health importance of the Centralia Lab is the case where a women woke up with a bat attached to her lip. She woke up frantic, ripped off the bat and screamed for her husband. He killed the bat and took her and the bat to St. Mary’s Hospital in Centralia. The hospital directed him to take the bat to the CADL. It was accessed into their system at 7:56 AM and their professional staff went to work, just like they have for the last 65 years. The bat’s testing was completed at 11 AM, and it was rabid!

A piece of State infrastructure like this close to the most populous region in the southern part of our State is of critical life-saving importance.

Discuss.

- Posted by Rich Miller   22 Comments      


More evidence of DoC harassment?

Tuesday, Jul 31, 2012

* The AP has uncovered a new memo

An email from an Illinois Department of Corrections administrator ordered wardens at 10 prisons to conduct “mass shakedowns” of staff as they left work last week, at the same time workers were telling lawmakers about problems at the facilities.

The July 19 memo obtained by The Associated Press is from Ty Bates, the department’s southern region deputy director.

It was sent less than 20 minutes after a hearing started at the state Capitol, where a dozen workers testified about prison overcrowding and understaffing. […]

Bates’ email to the 10 prison wardens and a halfway house superintendent asked that they “please ensure we conduct a mass shakedown on a shift of your choosing” by the end of last week.

It was dated July 19 at 11:18 a.m.

The testimony by prison workers in Springfield began at 11 a.m.

Anders Lindall, a spokesman for the workers’ union, the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees, called the shakedowns “retaliatory harassment” for employees who were speaking out publicly.

Correlation is not always causation, but at the very least this memo was unfortunately timed.

- Posted by Rich Miller   28 Comments      


There is no magic wand

Tuesday, Jul 31, 2012

* It’s so nice to see that Gov. Pat Quinn is now fully subscribed to the Tribune editorial board’s notion that all you have to do is wave a magic wand and hurl personal insults and the Illinois General Assembly will obey one’s every command

The third Friday in August should be a good day to get a tee time in Illinois. Gov. Pat Quinn just called Illinois lawmakers off the golf course and back to work that day to save the state from a fiscal collapse.

The governor said Monday he has called a special session of the Legislature on Aug. 17 to deal with pension reform. That’s good.

There were two things, though, that Quinn didn’t say.

He didn’t say he will use the next 16 days to press Republican and Democratic leaders for a deal on pensions, so the rank-and-file will have something to approve at the special session.

He didn’t say he’ll call another special session on Aug. 18, and another special session on Aug. 19, and another one every single day until the Legislature puts real, substantial pension savings into law.

We asked the governor to call a special session and applaud him for doing so. But that action guarantees only that lawmakers will have a reason to hang around for a day and go see Cheap Trick, the headliner at the State Fair that Friday night.

Actually, Quinn did say that he plans to use the next several days to publicly push the General Assembly to heel

“I think the way to look at it over these next couple of weeks is for the people of Illinois to put pressure on the legislature — their members of the legislature that are running for office in campaigns across Illinois … and I think this is a good time to say that, ‘This is a crying need of our state. We must act.’ “

* Ty Fahner is not on board, however

While the governor’s critics lauded him for taking the initiative and stopped short of ridiculing his move as a political stunt, virtually no one in or around the Capitol buys into Quinn’s apparent thinking that such a quick fix may be in the offing to a problem that took decades to create.

Instead, the emphasis is on the House and its uncertain plans for a watered-down pension-reform bill that passed the Senate in late May. If the House passed that proposal, it would generate headlines that the governor and General Assembly finally were addressing the pension problem, but the approach would fall well short of totally winnowing down what government employees have been told to expect during their retirements.

“It’s a great piece of politics, and beyond that it doesn’t do anything useful,” Tyrone Fahner, president of the Civic Committee of the Commercial Club of Chicago, said of Quinn’s special-session push if the emphasis strictly is on taking up the Senate-passed plan and having it fail.

“It’s shameful if that’s what the game is,” said Fahner, whose group has pushed a variety of more comprehensive pension reforms.

* Shades of Rod? Some, yes

The situation Quinn set into motion Monday is not entirely unlike what played out when former Gov. Rod Blagojevich kept calling lawmakers back into special session to bully them into passing a multibillion-dollar capital construction plan that no one trusted him enough to administer. At one point, Blagojevich had 17 special sessions going on at one time and never succeeded in getting what he wanted.

Quinn, of course, is no Blagojevich. He’s used his special-session powers just once before. But his strategy this time, at least now, seems headed for the same result as under his predecessor.

* The Tribune reporters who covered the story don’t share the optimism of their editorial page

The already-dim prospects of a deal on public employee pension reform before the November election got tangled up Monday in a disagreement over whether a special session on the issue should even be held next month.

Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn issued a proclamation summoning the General Assembly back to Springfield on Aug. 17, a move viewed as largely symbolic because lawmakers are no closer to striking a comprehensive deal than when they left town at the end of May. […]

Although Quinn sought to frame his special session call based on hopes for a deal, Republicans said privately that they had not talked to the governor since he had convened the legislative leadership in his office about six weeks ago. [Emphasis added.]

Calling a special session without first having extensive discussions with the leaders is quite Rodlike.

* More skepticism

Many house members as well as senators are skeptical much could be accomplished in one day.

“Do I have my doubts? Without question. Like anything, it’s a process,” said Sen. Donne Trotter, (D) Chicago. “It didn’t happen overnight. It’s not going to be corrected overnight.”

“I just don’t think in a couple of hours on a Friday in the middle of August we’re going to be able to accomplish the governor’s goal,” said Rep. Lou Lang, (D) Skokie.

“If they can negotiate a deal and ratify it on August 17th, I think it’s possible,” said Roosevelt University Professor Paul Green. “If they start on August 17th, it will be the longest day.”

* And the Republicans would like to see a plan in writing

Radogno spokeswoman Patty Schuh said Senate Republicans want to know more about Quinn’s plan, if he has one.

“We will be available in the coming weeks to discuss it, if the governor has a plan he’s going to lay out there or show us,” Schuh said.

- Posted by Rich Miller   33 Comments      


Cardinal George: “Could Jesus be accepted as a Chicagoan?”

Tuesday, Jul 31, 2012

* Francis Cardinal George blogged Sunday about Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s claim that the Chick-fil-A food chain’s values “are not Chicago’s values”

Recent comments by those who administer our city seem to assume that the city government can decide for everyone what are the “values” that must be held by citizens of Chicago. I was born and raised here, and my understanding of being a Chicagoan never included submitting my value system to the government for approval. Must those whose personal values do not conform to those of the government of the day move from the city? Is the City Council going to set up a “Council Committee on Un-Chicagoan Activities” and call those of us who are suspect to appear before it? I would have argued a few days ago that I believe such a move is, if I can borrow a phrase, “un-Chicagoan.”

The value in question is espousal of “gender-free marriage.” Approval of state-sponsored homosexual unions has very quickly become a litmus test for bigotry; and espousing the understanding of marriage that has prevailed among all peoples throughout human history is now, supposedly, outside the American consensus. Are Americans so exceptional that we are free to define “marriage” (or other institutions we did not invent) at will? What are we re-defining?

It might be good to put aside any religious teaching and any state laws and start from scratch, from nature itself, when talking about marriage. Marriage existed before Christ called together his first disciples two thousand years ago and well before the United States of America was formed two hundred and thirty six years ago. Neither Church nor state invented marriage, and neither can change its nature.

Marriage exists because human nature comes in two complementary sexes: male and female. The sexual union of a man and woman is called the marital act because the two become physically one in a way that is impossible between two men or two women. Whatever a homosexual union might be or represent, it is not physically marital. Gender is inextricably bound up with physical sexual identity; and “gender-free marriage” is a contradiction in terms, like a square circle.

Both Church and state do, however, have an interest in regulating marriage. It is not that religious marriage is private and civil marriage public; rather, marriage is a public institution in both Church and state. The state regulates marriage to assure stability in society and for the proper protection and raising of the next generation of citizens. The state has a vested interest in knowing who is married and who is not and in fostering good marriages and strong families for the sake of society.

The Church, because Jesus raised the marital union to the level of symbolizing his own union with his Body the Church, has an interest in determining which marital unions are sacramental and which are not. The Church sees married life as a path to sanctity and as the means for raising children in the faith, as citizens of the universal kingdom of God. These are all legitimate interests of both Church and state, but they assume and do not create the nature of marriage.

People who are not Christian or religious at all take for granted that marriage is the union of a man and a woman for the sake of family and, of its nature, for life. The laws of civilizations much older than ours assume this understanding of marriage. This is also what religious leaders of almost all faiths have taught throughout the ages. Jesus affirmed this understanding of marriage when he spoke of “two becoming one flesh” (Mt. 19: 4-6). Was Jesus a bigot? Could Jesus be accepted as a Chicagoan? Would Jesus be more “enlightened” if he had the privilege of living in our society? One is welcome to believe that, of course; but it should not become the official state religion, at least not in a land that still fancies itself free. Surely there must be a way to properly respect people who are gay or lesbian without using civil law to undermine the nature of marriage.

Surely we can find a way not to play off newly invented individual rights to “marriage” against constitutionally protected freedom of religious belief and religious practice. The State’s attempting to redefine marriage has become a defining moment not for marriage, which is what it is, but for our increasingly fragile “civil union” as citizens.

[Hat tip: Newsalert.]

Discuss.

- Posted by Rich Miller   102 Comments      


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*** UPDATED x3 - Cullerton to call back Senate on his own *** Quinn to Senate: See you in Springfield

Monday, Jul 30, 2012

* The governor made an announcement during his City Club speech today

Gov. Pat Quinn today called for a special session of the General Assembly on Aug. 17 to take up pension reform.

“It’s time to vote,” Quinn said of lawmakers. “See you in Springfield.”

The Illinois House already was scheduled to be in that day to deal with the fate of indicted Democratic Rep. Derrick Smith of Chicago.

More in a bit.

* Here’s the official proclamation

*** UPDATE 1 *** A joint statement by the two Republican legislative leaders…

“We are encouraged by the Governor’s call for a special session on pension reform on August 17. As many people know, we have been and continue to be supportive of comprehensive pension reform that solves the major crisis facing us today. The time to act has been upon us. We are continuing to encourage Governor Quinn to take a leadership role to get a comprehensive pension bill passed in the General Assembly. We will continue to be available to discuss this very important matter in the coming weeks.”

*** UPDATE 2 *** Senate President John Cullerton will ask the governor to rescind the special session proclamation so Cullerton can just add a session day on his own next month. Details in a bit.

*** UPDATE 3 *** And here’s the press release…

Illinois Senate President John J. Cullerton is asking the governor to withdraw his Special Session proclamation so taxpayers aren’t hit with thousands of dollars in unnecessary expenses.

Gov. Pat Quinn on Monday ordered a Special Session on Aug. 17 to address unspecified pension legislation. By doing so, the governor’s actions mean state taxpayers will cover certain transportation and travel costs for lawmakers and the total tab could cost taxpayers upward of $40,000 for the day.

“I share the governor’s interest in resolving the lingering pension issues, but it makes no sense to spend thousands of taxpayer dollars when there is an easy, no-cost alternative,” Cullerton said on Monday in recommending Quinn rethink the official Special Session.

Cullerton instead said he will bring the Senate back into session on Aug. 17, a move that would make the Senators ineligible to have travel costs covered by taxpayers. Under state law, if the governor demands a Special Session the taxpayers cover General Assembly travel costs, but if the Senate President or House Speaker simply convene an additional regular session day, there are no such taxpayer costs.

“I appreciate the seriousness of this issue, but there’s simply no need for taxpayers to incur the cost of a Special Session,” Cullerton said. Furthermore, the pension reform legislation likely to be addressed on Aug. 17 already cleared the Illinois Senate back on May 31. House Bill 1447 would substantially change lawmakers’ own pension system and that of state employees (SERS). The Illinois Senate approved the legislation in a remarkable bipartisan vote on the final day of the spring session.

According to recent media reports, the House may take up that legislation on Aug. 17. The House had already scheduled session on that day to take up a disciplinary recommendation involving one of its members.

The Senate President said all the circumstances show why a costly Special Session is unwarranted. The House was already coming back to the Capitol, the Senate President will add a session day, and the pension legislation in question already passed the Senate.

- Posted by Rich Miller   46 Comments      


Question of the day

Monday, Jul 30, 2012

* The setup

The faithful in western Illinois are heeding Gov. Pat Quinn’s request to pray for rain as the state suffers drought conditions.

Quincy-area residents gathered Sunday evening for a “Pray for Rain” event. The Quincy Herald-Whig reports that several religious organizations participated in the half-hour prayer service in a local park. The Rev. Patrick Smith of St. John’s Anglican Parish said it was an opportunity to “collectively ask God to do something that he can do.”

* The Question: What else should Illinoisans pray for?

- Posted by Rich Miller   29 Comments      


*** UPDATED x2 *** Adventures in scrolling down

Monday, Jul 30, 2012

* A recent Sun-Times story dealt with the plight of homeowners who live near a planned tollway ramp

Many, in fact, believe they are being ripped off by the tollway, which as a state agency wields the power to acquire land for the “common good” through eminent domain or condemnation. […]

“We’re being low-balled,” said Lane, who lives on the south end of the block, a cul-de-sac that is a stone’s throw from the northbound lanes of I-294. “My neighbors are all getting offers less than what their homes were worth. I hope (tollway officials) don’t get away with it. What they’re offering is nothing. The tollway is making out, the village is making out, the contractors are making out and the homeowners are losing.”

The Bells were told their home, which cost them $225,000 seven years ago, is worth $155,000. The Humeses’ dwelling, for which they paid $257,000, is worth $175,000, an assessor told them. Lane and his wife are waiting for their offer after meeting with tollway representatives on July 12.

* But if you read further into the story, you see this…

The Toll Highway Act that governs the scenario includes some protection for homeowners, and by law, the tollway will pay up to $25,000 whenever the cost of a replacement dwelling for a displaced resident is more than what the tollway paid to take the resident’s home. It also typically will pay off the balances on mortgages that are under water, tollway spokeswoman Wendy Abrams said. Relocation benefits are available as well.

So, if they get their mortgages paid off plus another $25K, that would seem to be a pretty decent deal. But not everybody thinks so…

“They are low-balling us pretty badly,” John Bell said. “The market values have plummeted and many of us are under water in our mortgages. What they’re offering does not provide us just compensation in trying to locate the house of our choice.”

Bell said that since the tollway had talked about the interchange for decades, the homes probably should not have been built there in the first place.

* But, of course, the Illinois Republican Party blamed the Madigan family. From a press release…

“It is sadly ironic that our Attorney General, who consistently ignores political corruption and rampant gang violence in the City of Chicago under the guise of being the ‘people’s attorney’ is now sticking it to the little guy,” said Illinois Republican Party Chairman Pat Brady. “Lisa Madigan should immediately suspend any further eviction actions until it is conclusively established that the citizens of Posen are being fairly and respectfully treated by the State of Illinois. I suspect the folks facing eviction would be treated substantially better if this tollway ran through her father’s State Representative District.”

* And then there’s this story about Treasurer Dan Rutherford. Here’s the AP’s lede

The state of Illinois is paying a Chicago consulting firm nearly $2 million to rebrand its program for returning unclaimed property to residents under a contract awarded by State Treasurer Dan Rutherford’s office.

* But this is from the Daily Herald

Rutherford’s office says the money used to pay for the new marketing program comes from the pot of unclaimed property owed to Illinoisans, not the state’s general checkbook used to pay bills.

And…

The new I-Cash was introduced this month to replace Cash Dash, which last year returned $101 million in previously unclaimed cash to owners or heirs — up 23 percent from the year before. […]

Earlier this month, Rutherford’s office announced the unclaimed property program recently added 780,000 names from records prior to 1992. […]

This year, claims are even higher than at the same point in 2011. […]

In three weeks, [Rutherford] said, visits to the state’s unclaimed property website, icash.illinois.gov, have gone up by nearly 200 percent.

So, it appears to be working.

*** UPDATE 1 *** From comments

Unclaimed property is paid for out of the state pension fund by appropriation of the Illinois General Assembly. Any surplus funds generated by unclaimed property go back into the state pension fund to be distributed to the five systems to help bring down the unfunded liability. He’s taking this $2 million right from the much discussed and very struggling pension funds to pay for the Dan Rutherford promotional tour. How anyone thought this was a good idea right during the middle of the controversial and contentious pension debate is beyond me.

*** UPDATE 2 *** From the treasurer’s office…

About the I-Cash story, here are a few keys points to consider:

    Illinois’ Unclaimed Property Division is funded by unclaimed cash and assets transferred to the State Treasurer’s Office; any excess in what is collected is then transferred to the pension system.

    The office’s marketing budget has been consistent for the last several years.

    The contract being discussed here buys statewide radio, billboard and website ads over three years – but note that none of these promotions feature Treasurer Rutherford’s face, name, or voice.

- Posted by Rich Miller   27 Comments      


Dems dominate fundraising… again

Monday, Jul 30, 2012

* My weekly syndicated newspaper column

The House and Senate Democratic leaders have once again dominated the quarterly fundraising race. The Democrats are currently sitting on almost three times the amount of cash as the Republicans.

House Speaker Michael Madigan’s three committees raised a combined $591,000 in the quarter that ended June 30th. Madigan had over $3.5 million cash on hand. Senate President John Cullerton’s two committees netted about $655,000 during the quarter. Cullerton finished with over $2.7 million in cash and investments.

House Republican Leader Tom Cross’ two committees raised $353,000 during the quarter. Cross ended the filing period with $789,000 on hand. Senate Republican Leader Christine Radogno raised just under $263,000 during the quarter, but had over $1.4 million on hand when the filing period on June 30th.

The disparities become even more problematic for the Republican leaders when you look at some of their hottest races. For instance, Downstate Senate candidate Andy Manar (D-Bunker Hill) raised an impressive $127K in the second quarter and ended the filing period with $340K. In contrast, Manar’s Republican opponent, Decatur Mayor Mike McElroy, raised just $26K and had less than $69K in the bank at the end of June.

Manar is John Cullerton’s former chief of staff, so he’d be expected to raise a lot of cash, but this is a must-win district for the Republicans and they needed a far better performance out of their candidate. They’re going to have to dip into the reserves in a big way to help out McElroy if he doesn’t kick himself into high gear.

Mike Babcock, a Republican running against Sen. Bill Haine (D-Alton), raised a mere $6,263.25 and ended the filing period with less than $20K on hand. Haine, on the other hand, raised over $75K and had almost $430K in the bank. Babcock has since raised $5K from conservative businessman Richard Uihlein, who has helped bankroll former gubernatorial candidate and GOP operative Dan Proft’s various operations.

Uihlein contributed $72,500 to Republican candidates since the recently ended filing period began on April 1st. The Uihlein list reads like a “Who’s Who” of hot campaigns. Randy Frese, who’s up against Sen. John Sullivan (D-Rushville), received $5,000 from Uihlein. Freeze raised an impressive $111K during the quarter, and had $127K in the bank. That almost matched Sen. Sullivan’s $131K raised in the latest filing period, but Sullivan had over $435K in the bank.

The House Republicans, meanwhile, have attempted to push their candidates to raise more money with a new “Young Guns” program modeled on the federal “Super PAC” affiliated with US House Majority Leader Eric Cantor. And Uihlein played a role there, too.

According to the House Republicans, Congressman Aaron Schock approached Leader Cross last year about starting a similar program to the federal Young Guns effort. Cross agreed and candidates were given fundraising and voter contact goals for the second quarter to qualify for big bucks. Generally, the fundraising targets were $50,000.

Jonathan Greenberg, a Republican running against Rep. Elaine Nekritz (D-Northbrook) raised about $51K during the quarterly reporting period. That qualifies him, and the other winners for a $100,000 contribution from the state’s Young Guns network, which will pool money from Schock, Cross, Congressman John Shimkus and individual House Republican members.

According to the House Republicans, about a half dozen candidates out of twelve met their Young Guns goals and will receive the $100K in matching funds. Neil Anderson is one of them. Anderson, like Greenberg, received a late $5K contribution from Uihlein. Anderson is up against Rep. Pat Verschoore (D-Milan). Uihlein’s money put Anderson over the $50K mark and qualified him for the Young Guns matching funds.

John Lawson also received a late $5K from Uihlein to get him into the Young Guns program. Lawson is up against Rep. Michelle Mussman (D-Schaumburg), who raised a mere $1,795.31 in the quarter and had only $27K in the bank. Another late $5K Uihlein contribution went to Julie Bigham Eggers, who is running against Rep. Jerry Costello, II (D-Smithton).

One other campaign finance story. Even though State Rep. Mark Beaubien passed away last year, his campaign committee was still funding his widow’s independent House bid this spring. Dee Beaubien received over $15K from her late husband’s committee in April, when the account was finally closed out. This is not unusual. Rep. Bernie Pedersen died in 1996, but his campaign account wasn’t closed down until 2009.

* Related…

* Disclosing taxes an issue in southern Ill. race: “If I start giving people crumbs, no one is ever going to be satisfied,” Plummer said.

* Illinois Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. Treated in Hospital for Depression: Illinois Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr., whose whereabouts haven’t been disclosed since he mysteriously took a medical leave several weeks ago, is being treated for depression at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., according to a statement Friday from the hospital.

* Jackson move to Mayo could point to complications: It also was the first mention that he’s now being treated for a “gastrointestinal issue,” which some experts said Saturday was a sign his condition is becoming more complicated.

* Rev. Jesse Jackson: No timetable on son’s recovery

* Editorial: End the debate debate: “We felt that one debate was ample for the Quad-City area,” said Schilling spokesman Jon Schweppe. We can’t help but recall when supporters of challenger Bobby Schilling would have begged for such exposure in his bid to oust incumbent Rep. Phil Hare. What a difference incumbency makes. As for Ms. Bustos, we expected this former reporter and editor to see the value in more debates and quickly jump at both opportunities. But if her campaign intends to participate in only one, we wonder why she chose an event sponsored by the Iowa-based TV station and newspaper. There are no votes to be mined in Iowa for a candidate seeking to represent Illinois.

* Joe Walsh takes without asking

* Biggert says recovering Kirk calls his treadmill his ‘dreadmill’

- Posted by Rich Miller   23 Comments      


Caption contest!

Monday, Jul 30, 2012

* Mayor Rahm Emanuel received a health screening last week…

Keep it clean, people. Thanks.

- Posted by Rich Miller   38 Comments      


ComEd Offers New Tools to Report Outages, Enhance Customer Service

Monday, Jul 30, 2012

[The following is a paid advertisement.]

As reported recently in the Chicago Sun-Times, ComEd’s investments to improve customer service and storm response include an array of new communications tools that make it easier to report outages and receive status updates.

Reflecting the utility’s desire to interact more effectively and deliver greater value to customers, these tools and services include:

    • A two-way text messaging system that allows customers to report outages to ComEd by text and enables the utility to text restoration information back to customers. Simply text “OUT” to 26633. Customers receive notifications when an outage has been reported at their address and ongoing updates as outage status changes.

    • A mobile application for iPhone® and Android™ devices, enabling users to conveniently report power outages and manage their accounts from their smartphones. The app also will provide notifications as the outage status is updated.

    • An interactive outage map now available on ComEd.com. The color-coded map allows customers to easily find information on the location and size of outages and get estimated power restoration times.

Customers can access their online account at ComEd.com to report outages and receive updates as outage status changes or call ComEd at 1-800-334-7661 to speak with a representative.

Customers can also follow ComEd on Twitter (@ComEd) or Facebook (facebook.com/ComEd) to stay up to date on the latest ComEd information.

- Posted by Advertising Department   Comments Off      


Department of Corrections attempts to intimidate reporter, workers

Monday, Jul 30, 2012

* Last month, it was the Department of Human Services threatening a reporter with prosecution. This month, it’s the Department of Corrections

A story last week identified some of the dangerous prisoners Gov. Pat Quinn’s administration is considering shipping out of the state when he closes the supermax prison in Tamms.

Information identifying those particular inmates came from within the prison. And, top brass at the Illinois Department of Corrections really don’t like whistleblowers.

For example, IDOC officials recently pursued two employees who had provided information to The Associated Press regarding the agency’s ill-fated early prisoner release program. The two whistleblowers retired before they could be purged by the secretive agency.

Hoping to tamp down last week’s news about outsourcing prisoners, Jerry Buscher, executive chief at IDOC, sent a letter to the Lee Springfield Bureau, suggesting that if the names of the inmates being considered for out-of-state placement were printed, guards and inmates could be in danger.

“If you proceed to disclose any information in your possession on this subject beyond yourself, the department will view your actions as attempting to promote disorder within the prison system,” Buscher wrote.

The union representing guards and other prison employees, however, had no problem with the publication of the inmates’ names.

Thankfully, the threats didn’t kill the story.

* AFSCME is also claiming intimidation at the prisons

Illinois authorities took the unusual step of searching guards and other prison employees for contraband as they left at least seven facilities last week, sparking worker allegations that the checks may have been reprisals for complaints about overcrowding and understaffing and inside information leaked to the news media, workers and union officials told The Associated Press. […]

The searches began just days after prison workers complained publicly in Springfield about prison conditions and followed a newspaper report about where some displaced Tamms inmates would go. That report was based on an internal Corrections document.

The employees’ union said such searches are rare and may constitute “retaliatory harassment,” which the Corrections agency denied. […]

Illinois Department of Corrections policy allows searches of employees at any time - beginning, during or ending a shift - to ensure they are not carrying banned materials, from magazines and cigarettes to illegal drugs and weapons.

But Kim Larson, an accountant at the Danville prison for 12 years, said she never received a pat down before when she left her 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. shift.

* Meanwhile, Gov. Pat Quinn has made some changes at DHS. From a press release

Governor Pat Quinn has announced the appointment of Michael McCotter as Special Investigator of the Office of the Inspector General of the Illinois Department of Human Services (DHS). McCotter, a 40-year law enforcement veteran, will be charged with reforming the investigative operations of the Inspector General’s office. Governor Quinn also named Daniel Dyslin as Acting Inspector General for DHS until a permanent replacement is named. Today’s actions follow an executive order issued by the governor earlier this month to strengthen protections for adults with disabilities.

…Adding… Related…

* Quinn’s office claims $57M in savings

* AFSCME challenges transfers from JDC: Another 23 residents are expected to be moved out of the Jacksonville Developmental Center by Wednesday, including two who will be transferred to a community-based home where employees previously were found negligent by the inspector general for the Department of Human Resources.

* DHS ends contract with Chicago mental health center: Dr. Carl Bell, the center’s head and part-time professor of clinical psychology and public health at the University of Illinois at Chicago, blames the center’s fiscal problems on the state’s woes. He notes Illinois began slowing payments two years ago. He says as a result, the center he founded in 1975 has lost seven psychiatrists, in addition to therapists and case managers.

- Posted by Rich Miller   34 Comments      


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